Big Bad Blog AT&T
WEEI.com Blog Network

Claude Julien should go back to what works in must-win games

04.09.15 at 11:15 am ET
By   |   Comments
Though he's better off at center long-term, David Krejci should stick at right wing for now. (Elsa/Getty Images)

Though he’s better off at center long-term, David Krejci should stick at right wing for now. (Elsa/Getty Images)

SUNRISE, Fla. — By the end of Thursday night, the Bruins could either be in the playoffs, a win away from them, or in big trouble.

Two points against the Panthers is the team’€™s surest path of avoiding that last scenario. With the B’€™s tied with the Senators with 95 points and holding the regulation and overtime wins tiebreaker for the time being, the Bruins must assume that Ottawa will win both its remaining games. The Rangers have incentive to let Ottawa win on Thursday as a means of making sure they don’t have to see Tuukka Rask in the postseason. Winning Thursday and Saturday could very well be the only way in for Boston.

After Wednesday’€™s loss to the Capitals, Claude Julien should go back to some of the lines that helped the Bruins beat the Panthers and four other teams during Boston’€™s recent five-game win streak.

A confusing lack of commitment was a bigger reason for Wednesday’s result, but the lines also played a part. Julien broke up the trio of Ryan Spooner between Milan Lucic and David Pastrnak Wednesday in his second attempt to return David Krejci to center. The Lucic-Krejci-Pastrnak line opened with two bad shifts, the second of which saw them give Washington a goal, and they were broken up. In the third period, Julien went back to Lucic-Spooner-Pastrnak and returned Krejci to Patrice Bergeron‘s right wing.

He shouldn’€™t wait that long Thursday. The Spooner line scored the game-tying and game-winning goals against the Panthers on March 31 at the Garden, making up for the fact that they allowed a Brad Boyes goal.

It’€™s understandable why Julien wants to move Krejci back to center, but at this point the B’€™s could actually better afford to experiment in Game 1 or 2 of the playoffs than in Game 81 of the regular season. Julien should go back to Brad Marchand-Bergeron-Krejci and Lucic-Spooner-Pastrnak against the Panthers.

Where things go from there is unknown. The Bruins did not have a morning skate on Thursday, so Julien’€™s plan with his lines is once again anyone’€™s guess.

He should use the lines he used against the Maple Leafs last Saturday. Even if they scored only one goal during 65 minutes of play against a bad team, they took 81 shots. Such performances should pay off on the scoreboard, even if one didn’€™t overwhelm on Saturday.

The lines in that game were as follows:

Marchand-Bergeron-Krejci
Eriksson-Soderberg-Smith
Lucic-Spooner-Pastrnak
Talbot-Kelly-Connolly

That game saw the Marchand-Bergeron-Krejci line score its first goal in its six games together. Moving Krejci to center meant breaking up a line when it was just starting to produce.

After a couple of costly mistakes from Reilly Smith, Brett Connolly moved up to play with Carl Soderberg and Louis Eriksson. Julien should start the game with Connolly playing in that spot.

This is suboptimal for the Bruins. In a perfect world, they could take their time and get to a point where Lucic and Krejci can be reunited. Lucic-Spooner-Pastrnak playing against weaker competition is too proven to go away from now, however. Julien’€™s best bet at winning these games is sticking with what works.

Read More: David Krejci,

Live Chat: Talk all things Bruins with DJ Bean at noon

04.09.15 at 10:03 am ET
By   |   Comments

What did you think of the Bruins’ performance last night? Will they still make the playoffs? Who needs to step up?

Discuss all things Bruins with DJ Bean right here at noon.

Live Blog DJ Bean Live Chat
 

5 things we learned as Bruins get shutout by Braden Holtby once again

04.08.15 at 10:38 pm ET
By   |   Comments

WASHINGTON, D.C. — When the Senators fell behind by three goals Tuesday night, it seemed the Bruins were a win away from a playoff spot. When the Bruins fell behind by three goals a night later, Boston’€™s playoff chances became slightly better than a coin flip.

While Ottawa was able to erase its deficit and win on Tuesday, the Bruins’€™ worrisome outing against the Capitals meant that their game in hand is now gone and they enter a two-game fight for their playoff lives.

For the third time this season, the Bruins failed to beat Braden Holtby as the Washington netminder picked up his third shutout against the Bruins this season, stopping all 27 Boston shots Wednesday. The B’€™s played sloppily with the puck and didn’t enjoy potent stays in the offensive zone, leading to the 3-0 blanking.

He becomes the first goalie to blank the Bruins in all three games in one season, stopping all 88 shots he faced.

Not helping the Bruins was the fact that they did not have a power play on the night. The only three penalties of the game came against Boston.

With the loss, the Bruins remain at 95 points, tied with the Senators for the second wild card spot in the Eastern Conference through 80 games. If the Bruins win Thursday in Florida and Saturday in Tampa with at least one of the wins coming in regulation or overtime, they’€™ll be in.

The B’€™s could still also surpass the Penguins (96 points), Red Wings (97) or Islanders (98), but Wednesday presented a much easier option for the team to control its destiny. Now their playoff hopes could very well come down to the final game of the season.

Here are four more things we learned Wednesday:

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Krejci, David Pastrnak, Washington Capitals

Pressure still on Bruins in difficult matchup with Capitals

04.08.15 at 1:04 pm ET
By   |   Comments
Braden Holtby has shut out the Bruins twice this season. (Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images)

Braden Holtby has shut out the Bruins twice this season. (Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Claude Julien said he watched “a couple periods” of Tuesday night’€™s Penguins-Senators game. Interestingly enough, so did the Penguins.

“That third period wasn’€™t what I expected,” he added after Wednesday’€™s morning skate.

By now, he probably should have expected it. The Senators came back from from a 3-0 deficit with a goal in the second period and two more in the third to force overtime, where Mark Stone scored his second goal of the night to give Ottawa two huge points and keep the pressure on the Bruins. The fact that Pittsburgh picked up a point in the process on a night in which Detroit jumped back into the third playoff spot in the Atlantic Division didn’€™t help either.

Had the Senators lost in regulation to the Penguins, the Bruins could have wrapped up a playoff spot with a win over the Capitals Wednesday. Now, the Bruins need as many or more points in their final three games than the Senators get in their final two.

The Bruins and Senators are currently tied with 95 points. If the Senators are to win out, the Bruins would need to earn four points, with at least one of those victories coming in regulation or overtime. That’€™s what’€™s required to finish ahead of the Senators.

Of course, both teams could still get in and another could slip out. The Penguins are at 96 points on the season through 80 games, while the Red Wings (97 points in 80 games) and Islanders (98 points in 80 games) remain at risk to miss the playoffs.

All of the teams with whom the Bruins are competing for a spot in the postseason have played 80 games. Wednesday night’€™s tilt against the Capitals, who have already secured a playoff spot but would still benefit from two points for the sake of positioning, is Boston’€™s 80th game. Winning in regulation or overtime would allow the B’€™s to breathe far easier heading into their final two games.

“We’€™ve been playing kind of playoff hockey in the last 10, 15 games, so nothing’€™s going to change in these last three games,” David Krejci said.

“The good thing is that we control our own destiny, and if we win all three games then we don’€™t have to look at other teams,” he added. “It’€™s a pretty big game tonight, so we’€™ll try to get two points and move on to Florida tomorrow.”

Getting two points won’€™t be easy. Braden Holtby is expected to start for the Capitals Wednesday, and the Bruins have yet to get a puck past him in two meetings this season. The last time the teams met, a first-period Brad Marchand penalty led to a goal for Washington’€™s NHL-best power play that decided the March 15 contest.

“We’€™ve got to be a little bit better than we were last time,” Julien said. “It took us a while; they had a good start and it took us a while to get ourselves in the game. They got an early power play goal and then it stayed like that for a while.”

That is, until a Nate Schmidt shot went off Gregory Campbell‘€™s hand and past Tuukka Rask. From there, Braden Holtby completed his second shutout of the season against the Bruins with a 32-save blanking.

“We have to have a better start and manage the puck well against these guys. I think we can spend some time in the o-zone if we manage the puck better than we did in here last time and keep our feet moving, and at the same time, respect their offense. To me it’€™s going to be a man’€™s game tonight and if you want to play this kind of game, you’€™ve got to be ready to put everything on the line.”

Read More: Braden Holtby, Claude Julien, David Krejci,

Claude Julien sends mixed signals with lines as Bruins prepare for Capitals

04.08.15 at 12:31 pm ET
By   |   Comments

WASHINGTON, D.C. — As the Bruins prepare for the first of what could be three must-wins to end the regular season, Claude Julien is in secret-keeping mode.

Both Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg participated in Wednesday’€™s morning skate, but Julien’€™s forward lines were borderline indecipherable. The two lines that stayed consistent throughout were Marchand-Bergeron-Eriksson and Lucic-Krejci-Pastrnak. The bottom six varied.

Early in the skate, the third line was Carl Soderberg between Chris Kelly and Reilly Smith, with Julien not putting a fourth line out in rushes. Later in the practice, the bottom six was Kelly/Paille-Spooner-Connolly and Campbell-Soderberg-Smith. How the lines look when the Capitals and Bruins square off at 8 p.m. is anyone’€™s guess.

“I know it’€™s a big story right now, but it is what it is,” Julien said after the morning skate. “We’€™re moving guys around and we’€™ve got Plan A, Plan B, Plan C, if you want. We can move different guys around, so to me it’€™s a normal thing for coaches. I look at the teams that are winning, and from game to game they change lines anyway.

“I guess you guys have gotten accustomed to seeing the same lines from me for years and being a little more patient. This year’€™s been different. That’€™s basically what it is.”

Krejci has played mostly right wing in his six games back from a knee injury. Asked whether he felt healthy enough to return full-time to center (such an attempt did not last in last Thursday’s game against the Red Wings), Krejci declined comment.

“I don’€™t like to answer these questions,” Krejci said. “I’€™m playing, so I feel good.”

Read More: Claude Julien,

Zdeno Chara returns to Bruins practice, Dougie Hamilton won’t travel

04.07.15 at 11:19 am ET
By   |   Comments

WILMINGTON — Zdeno Chara took the ice early and participated in Tuesday’€™s practice with his teammates. The Bruins captain missed Monday’€™s skate due to an injury suffered blocking a shot with his left foot/ankle Saturday.

Claude Julien had said after Monday’s practice that Chara’s situation was “day-to-day.” The fact that Chara stayed out for practice and did not appear limited is an encouraging sign.

Dennis Seidenberg was the only player missing from Tuesday’€™s practice. Julien said Tuesday that Seidenberg was under the weather but would travel with the team for their upcoming three-game road trip. Dougie Hamilton, who skated by himself for the second straight day, will not travel. The possibility always exists that Hamilton could meet the team for one of the final couple games of the regular season if he is ready to return.

Joe Morrow, who was recalled Monday morning on an emergency basis, remains with the team.

The lineup in practice was as follows:

Marchand-Bergeron-Eriksson
Lucic-Krejci-Pastrnak
Kelly/Paille-Spooner-Connolly
Campbell-Soderberg-Smith/Talbot

Chara-McQuaid
Morrow-Trotman
Bartkowski-Krug

Read More: Dennis Seidenberg, Dougie Hamilton, Zdeno Chara,

Gregory Campbell ‘putting personal agendas aside’ after healthy scratch

04.06.15 at 12:54 pm ET
By   |   Comments
Gregory Campbell was a healthy scratch for the first time as a Bruin Saturday. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Gregory Campbell was a healthy scratch Saturday for the first time as a Bruin. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

WILMINGTON — Long after his teammates had showered, fulfilled their media responsibilities, grabbed food in the team lounge and headed home, Gregory Campbell was still on the ice at Ristuccia Arena by himself.

A healthy scratch for the first time in his Bruins career Saturday, Campbell didn’t feel ready to leave following Monday’s approximately 40-minute practice (one for which he took the ice early). The image of him shooting pucks alone for approximately 55 minutes was fitting of his 2014-15 season: He wants to be better, but his spot in the lineup is questionable at best.

“I like being out here,” Campbell said as he got off the ice, adding: “I wanted to do some things.

“It’s uncharted,” he said of not playing. “I’ve never experience it before, but at this stage of the game, it’s about putting personal agendas aside and it’s about honoring the team and the decisions the coaches make. It is what it is. It’s about honoring the team.”

Saturday’s benching was perhaps overdue given the way Campbell and his fellow fourth-liners have fared this season.

After coming to Boston and centering the best fourth line in the league with Brad Marchand and Shawn Thornton, Campbell’s eventual line with Daniel Paille and Thornton routinely put opponents’ bottom-sixers on their heels, most notably helping change the momentum of Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals after Vancouver took it to Boston in the early shifts.

Yet those vintage Merlot Line days, which really lasted until Campbell broke his leg in the 2013 Eastern Conference finals, are long over. Thornton is gone, Paille has been a healthy scratch in Boston’s last six games, while Campbell at long last sat over the weekend.

That’s where the aforementioned personal agendas may come in. A free agent at season’s end who seems unlikely to return, Campbell has given a lot to this team. It can’t be easy to go from a fan favorite to a scapegoat in what’s been a trying season for both him and the Bruins.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Claude Julien, Gregory Campbell,
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines