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P.K. Subban knocks net off, Dale Weise mocks Bruins with celebration

05.06.14 at 11:28 pm ET
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MONTREAL — P.K. Subban regularly gets the Bruins off their game. In Game 3, he got the net off its moorings, which may have cost the Bruins the game.

P.K. Subban

P.K. Subban

With the B’s pushing to tie a 3-2 game in the final seconds of the game, the Canadiens defenseman — who had a goal and an assist in the game — skated into the goal post and knocked it off. Had he been called for it, the Bruins would have had a power play by virtue of a delay of game minor.

“After [Subban] rimmed the puck, Torey [Krug] got the puck and he found me. I had so much room in front of me, I could have walked in. You never what can happen with 8-10 seconds left,” David Krejci said. “Yeah, it was frustrating at the time, but I don’t know if that was a penalty or not.”

Patrice Bergeron is as measured a human being as there is, yet he struggled to downplay the infraction when asked about it after the game.

“He’s playing the clock and he’s trying to make something happen,” Bergeron said. “Maybe he felt that we were coming hard. You’ve got to leave it to the refs, and they didn’t make the call. It’s about bearing down and starting a lot earlier to make it a game.”

Meanwhile, Dale Weise pulled off a pretty good mock chest-pound after his second-period goal. The Bruins have celebrated big goals this season by pounding their chest repeatedly, with Milan Lucic and Krug taking part. After beating Tuukka Rask five-hole on a breakaway Tuesday, Weise got in on the fun.

Read More: Dale Weise, P.K. Subban,

Bruins can’t finish comeback as Canadiens take Game 3

05.06.14 at 9:56 pm ET
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MONTREAL — The Bruins weren’t able to complete their now regular comeback Tuesday as they fell behind by multiple goals and — get this — lost Game 3 of the second round against the Canadiens in regulation at the Bell Centre.

The Bruins spotted Montreal a 3-0 lead in the first two periods, and though Jarome Iginla brought the B’s within one with the extra attacker on with 2:16 left, Carey Price and the Canadiens held on and Lars Eller scored an empty netter to give the Canadiens a 4-2 win and a 2-1 series lead.

Tomas Plekanec scored Montreal’s first goal, with Thomas Vanek sending a slap pass from the point to Plekanec and the Montreal center putting the puck in the open net with Tuukka Rask respecting Vanek’s angle. After P.K. Subban was sent off for a questionable hit on Reilly Smith, Dougie Hamilton misplayed a two-on-two with Subban coming out of the box, leading to a breakaway goal and a 2-0 Canadiens lead that was taken into the first intermission.

Dale Weise made it 3-0 at 13:52 of the second, slipping past Andrej Meszaros and Johnny Boychuk and taking a long pass from Danny Briere before beating Rask on a breakaway. The play came as a result of Mike Weaver blocking a Meszaros shot.

The Bruins finally got on the board when Patrice Bergeron won an offensive zone draw and dished to Brad Marchand before getting to the front of the net and tipping a Torey Krug shot past Carey Price to make it 3-1.

Game 4 will be played Thursday at the Bell Centre.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

– That’s a major goof on Hamilton’s part with Subban getting out of the box and a two-on-two unfolding. Hamilton skated across to take out Eller, though Bergeron already was on Eller. With Hamilton skating further and further out of position, Eller hit Subban with a pass to set up the breakaway.

In general, it didn’t appear to be Hamilton’s night, as he also had a defensive zone turnover early in the second that could have been costly. The B’s second-year defenseman has enjoyed a very productive postseason (two goals and four assists for six points), but Tuesday served as a reminder that he’s still 20 years of age.

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Dare to dream: Bruins hope to keep things 5-on-5 at Bell Centre

05.06.14 at 1:57 pm ET
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MONTREAL — The Bell Centre can be a tough place to play, especially in the postseason.

The fans are crazy and the pregame presentation is second to none, but home ice calls overshadow everything. The Canadiens get their power plays one way or another, and if their power play is anything like it’s been the last two games, they score.

Yet with nine power plays in the first two games of the series in Boston, the Canadiens proved something that was proven throughout the regular season: They get calls anywhere. Montreal had 140 power plays at home this season and 139 on the road.

As such, it’s safe to assume the Habs will get something like nine power plays over the next two games. Whether it’s the same way they got them in Boston — with some diving, some should-be matching minors that weren’t matching and the Bruins losing their cool — remains to be seen. Either way, the B’s have to know the power plays for Montreal are coming.

When they do, the Bruins have to look more like the group that held the Red Wings to two power play goals and less like the group that has allowed four goals to Montreal through two games.

The biggest issue has been stopping P.K. Subban, who has been able to get too many pucks to the net. Only one of the four goals he’s created (two scored, two assisted) has come off a one-timer, with the others being a normal slap shot, a wrist shot and a pass.

The solution there is getting in the shooting lanes and stopping those bids, which for whatever reason the B’s haven’t done. Zdeno Chara, Gregory Campbell and Brad Marchand have all been guilty parties in that regard.

‘€œThat’€™s one of the areas we have to be better at,” Chara said Tuesday morning. “He’€™s putting those shots really quickly through our players and we’€™ve got to make sure we do a better job.’€

It goes without saying, but if the Bruins can stay out of the box, they’ll be in tremendous shape. The B’s were the best five-on-five team in the NHL this season and have outscored the Canadiens, 7-2 in the second round.

“Five-on-five I thought we’ve played very well. Carey Price is a good goalie and he’s made some big saves, but I think that we’ve had enough chances that we can win games five-on-five,” Reilly Smith said. “We’ve been the stronger team five-on-five for sure.”

Perhaps the most notable penalty thus far wasn’t given to a player at all, but rather Claude Julien. The Bruins were given a bench minor late in the second period of Game 2 when Claude Julien cussed out an official.

The B’s don’t want that to happen again, but Julien said Tuesday that he isn’t ashamed of the penalty.

“I don’t regret doing what I did,” Julien said. “I thought I stood up for my team at the time. But the biggest thing there is is you turn around and you tell your team to turn the page and go out there in the third and play the way they can. That’s part of the message that our team has to take from the last game. When we focus on the things we can control, it’s a lot more beneficial than not.”

Read More: P.K. Subban, Zdeno Chara,

Claude Julien, Bruins trying to manage media spin machine vs. Michel Therrien, Canadiens

05.06.14 at 12:51 pm ET
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MONTREAL – Claude Julien and the Bruins are no strangers to postseason wars of words.

Claude Julien doesn't want things getting out of hand. (AP)

Claude Julien doesn’t want things getting out of hand. (AP)

In what looks a bit like the 2011 Eastern Conference finals, when Julien and Guy Boucher went back and forth with comments in the media, Julien and Habs coach Michel Therrien have had some things to say about one another in the second round.

After the Bruins won Game 2, Julien said that the B’s won the game despite putting up with “a lot of crap.” Therrien fired back Monday morning.

“[Claude]‘€™s not happy with all that ‘€˜crap,’ ‘€™’€ Therrien said. “They try to influence referees. That’€™s the way they are. That’€™s not going to change. That’€™s the way that they like to do their things. … But we all know what they try to do.”

Therrien’s words were similar to Julien’s comment in 2011 about Boucher lobbying for calls with his comments in the media. On Tuesday, Julien declined to take things any further with Therrien.

“You know what? Everybody’s entitled to their comments,” Julien said. “People are trying to make more out of this on-ice rivalry, trying to turn it into an off-ice rivalry. Everybody’s entitled to their comments. Some of it can be gamesmanship; whatever it is doesn’t really matter. Right now I’m focusing on my team and what we need to do. That’s what both teams are trying to do, I think.”

Therrien also asserted that the Bruins started this week’s popular storyline that the Bruins have “solved” Carey Price by shooting pucks high. That wasn’t the case, as both Torey Krug and Dougie Hamilton were asked Sunday about scoring goals high on Price with him moving laterally across the net. Hamilton essentially said that goalies look low when you screen them, which was then spun into the Bruins saying that they’ve figured out Montreal’s goaltender.

“I don’t know if we’re really trying, but we’ve definitely noticed that,” Hamilton said Sunday. “I think when we can get our shots through past their defensemen — especially when they’re trying to block it — I think we have a good chance of getting it in.”

That somehow turned into a proclamation that the B’s have uncovered the secret to scoring on Price.

“We hope that people will write the things that were actually said,” Julien said in French. “It’€™s that Carey Price, I had him for several weeks with Team Canada, he’€™s one of the best goalies in the National Hockey League. I don’€™t think we’€™re here talking about weaknesses or things like that. It’€™s pretty obvious that thanks to him his team is very good at the moment, he’€™s been playing some great hockey from the start. Some things said by a young player were taken out of context, and something bigger was made of it. As I said earlier, we’€™re looking after our own stuff and we’€™re keeping the focus on what we need to do on the ice, not off the ice.”

The biggest oddity regarding the “shoot high” narrative is that the Bruins have only scored three times this series from shooting the puck high on Price. The players themselves find the storyline something between amusing and silly.

“It’s just the press and the media trying to create arguments and create banter,” Reilly Smith said. “We stay away from that kind of stuff, and if that’s the way the media wants to portray the series and talk between the teams, that’s what they’ll do.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Michel Therrien, Reilly Smith,

Pierre McGuire on M&M: Bruins ‘much more disciplined on the road’

05.06.14 at 12:37 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire of NBC Sports joined Mut & Merloni on Tuesday morning to discuss the Eastern Conference semifinal series between the Bruins and Canadiens. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

The Bruins evened up the series in dramatic fashion on Saturday, as the team rallied from a two-goal deficit in the third period en route to a 5-3 victory in Game 2 at TD Garden.

“€œIt was like Game 2 of Detroit and Boston, too, exactly what Boston had to do,” McGuire said. “Sometimes it takes a little while to warm up to a series, and it took the Bruins a little while to warm up to the Detroit series and they clearly did that in Game 2 and never lost another game in the series. I thought that Boston really warmed up to this series after losing in double overtime in Game 1. €œIt takes a little while.

“They’€™re into it, they’€™re fully engaged now, and they’€™ll have to be because that will be a raucous crowd in Montreal tonight and Thursday night won’€™t get any easier.”

The Bruins once again struggled with maintaining their composure in Game 2. The Canadiens made use of six power-play opportunities in the contest, with two goals coming on the man advantage.

“It’€™s easier to say and harder to do,”€ said McGuire, adding: “It’€™s really difficult to talk about it and you keep getting hit over the head all the time with it, and I think there was some frustration because they were getting chances. … It’€™s all difficult stuff, but I think they’€™ll find their way. The one thing I know about this team, when they’€™re home, it’€™s one thing, because they want to please their fans so badly. … But the other thing, when they go on the road, I find them to be much more disciplined on the road than they are at home.”

It was not just the Bruins skaters getting penalized by the referees in Game 2, as Bruins coach Claude Julien was called for an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty in the final minutes of the second period.

“It started early on in the game and I can tell you, he was really upset with [official] Scott Cherrey on an offside that he thought wasn’t an offside,” McGuire said. “Then it carried over to the second period, he didn’t like some of the calls going against his team, but it was nothing out of this world. It was nothing crazy. Trust me, I hear it all. It wasn’t anything nuts. And then, I don’€™t know what happened.”

Added McGuire: “€œI did not hear him say anything derogatory. I thought it was something that happened on the ice. I don’€™t know how [official] Dave Jackson heard anything from where he was standing from the Bruins bench, because it was definitely loud at that point in the game and when you’€™re on the ice, you’€™re down low. Unless you’€™re really scrutinizing, there’s no possible way you can hear anything.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Eastern Conference Semifinals, Game 2

Why the book on Carey Price is not out

05.05.14 at 1:24 pm ET
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The Bruins have beaten Carey Price in all sorts of different ways. (AP)

The Bruins have beaten Carey Price in all sorts of different ways. (AP)

Last year it was Corey Crawford‘s glove, and now it’s the top half of the net against Carey Price. As the Bruins score their goals in certain spots, the idea of “the book being out” on the opposing goaltender naturally emerges.

Yet in the case of the Bruins vs. Price, the narrative developing isn’t quite accurate. Speaking to the Bruins goaltender — whom we all know is extremely honest –€“ the whole thing is silly. In Tuukka Rask‘€™s mind, goaltenders can’t reach the NHL with free spaces on their bingo boards.

“I think every goalie in this league feels like if you see the shot, you should stop it pretty much,” Rask said Monday. “I mean, there’s tendencies where guys get scored on more than other places, but I don’t think there’s one particular spot on any goalie where you just want to keep shooting and shooting.”

On Sunday, Bruins players were asked about the Bruins having scored a lot of goals this series on Price by shooting high, and their answers suggested that to be the case. Dougie Hamilton even said that B’s shooters had picked up on the fact that Price was looking low.

“€œI think we’ve definitely noticed that when he’s screened he’s looking low and he gets really low,” Hamilton said. “I think we can score a lot of goals up high when we have a net-front presence. I don’t know if we’re really trying, but we’ve noticed that.”

That may be the case, but after looking through all seven goals the B’s have scored on Price through the first two games of the series, it’s barely even a tendency. In fact, only three of Boston’s goals have come from shooting high: Reilly Smith‘s third-period goal in Game 1 while Price was trying to look around a screen, Daniel Paille‘s snap shot in Game 2 (which wasn’t even shot all that high; it went off Francis Bouillon and up) and Hamilton’s Game 2 snap shot glove side high as Price was moving across his net.

If anything, taking advantage of Price on the move has been key for the Bruins. Hamilton’s goal and Smith’s Game 2 goal both came as a result of that, as Smith shot the puck glove side around the middle of the net as Price was moving across.

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Tuukka Rask welcomes baby daughter

05.05.14 at 12:16 pm ET
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Tuukka Rask and his girlfriend welcomed a baby girl this weekend, making the Bruins goaltender a father for the first time.

The due date for the child to arrive was Friday, the day after Game 1 of the second round against the Canadiens, and the baby was born either Sunday or early Monday morning. There was a state police officer at Friday’s practice, perhaps to provide an escort if need be, and the Bruins would have had a plan to get Rask to Boston from Montreal had the baby come after the Bruins had left for Canada on Monday.

Bruins backup goaltender Chad Johnson told ESPN Boston on Thursday that he was prepared to play in case Rask had to leave Game 1 to tend to the situation.

“€œI’€™ve sort of talked to him about it. You don’€™t know what’€™s going to happen there, so you sort of have to be ready,” Johnson said. “I don’€™t know if he’€™s going to leave or not leave in that situation, but again, you can’€™t really control anything. I just have to try to be ready for any situation, if I get to start or I get put in, I want to make the best of it and try to do as well as you can.”

Understandably with a lot on his mind, Rask had an uncharacteristic performance Thursday and vented about his own play following the 4-3 double-overtime loss to Montreal.

The weight off the new father’s shoulders was celebrated by the entire team Monday, as the B’s selected Rask to lead the team’s stretch at the end of Monday’s practice.

Games 3 and 4 of the second round will be played Tuesday and Thursday at the Bell Centre.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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