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Bruins prospect Tommy Cross plays star in Beanpot semifinal

02.08.11 at 12:39 am ET
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Boston College defenseman Tommy Cross hopes to one day make some noise at TD Garden as a member of the Boston Bruins, but Monday he settled for doing so in his familiar Eagles sweater. The former second-round pick of the Bruins scored the game-winning goal in Monday’s Beanpot semifinal, beating Boston University netminder Kieran Milan in overtime with the Eagles on the power play and clinching a 3-2 win.

The Bruins traded up in the 2007 NHL Draft to select Cross with the 35th overall pick. Right knee injuries kept him from participating in Bruins rookie development camps until this summer, where he joined fellow B’s prospects for the first time.

With Harvard’s Alexander Fallstrom and BU’s David Warsofsky having lost on Monday, Cross will be the lone Bruins representative in the tournament final vs. Northeastern.

Read More: Beanpot, David Warsofsky, Tommy Cross,

Bruins recall Jordan Caron from Providence

02.07.11 at 6:28 pm ET
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In an announcement that would probably be much bigger news if it weren’t for Marc Savard‘s season ending, the Bruins on Monday recalled winger Jordan Caron from Providence. Caron began the season in the NHL before being sent down on Dec. 6.

In 20 games for Boston this season, Caron had three goals and four assists for seven points and averaged 13:17 of ice time per night. The 20-year-old had 6-11=17 totals for Providence over 27 games.

The Bruins are currently without winger Daniel Paille for the next three games due to a four-game suspension, which could potentially help Caron find a spot in the lineup given that both players are strong on the penalty kill.

Caron was selected by the Bruins with the 25th overall pick of the 2009 NHL draft. He impressed early on in training camp but struggled with confidence, making him a healthy scratch in the game’s first season. He went on to score his first career goal against Martin Brodeur on Oct. 16, his second NHL game. Caron did not score a goal over the 13 games leading to his demotion.

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Marc Savard not ready to think about retirement

02.07.11 at 3:05 pm ET
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A big decision was announced Monday by the Bruins, and Marc Savard hopes it’s the last major decision he has to make regarding the concussions that have plagued his career.

An emotional Savard took the podium at TD Garden for the second time in as many seasons on Monday as he discussed his 2010-11 season ending after just 25 games. Savard has suffered two concussions in just over 10 months, with the most recent coming on Jan. 22.

With Savard having incurred four concussions over the course of his career and Peter Chiarelli saying the center was “frustrated” with struggling with the speed of the game when he did return from post-concussion syndrome in December, Savard said he is avoiding the inevitable decision of whether he might retire.

“I’m trying to stay away from that right now,” Savard said Monday. “It’s tough enough as it is not to be able to finish the season. Obviously, we’re going to get some more medical stuff done, some tests, and then I’ll be able to make a clearer decision on what my future is.

“Right now, I’m hoping to be able to continue at some point again.”

If that doesn’t prove to be the case and Savard decides to retire, one guy who has seen it all would be understanding.

“No, I wouldn’t [blame him for retiring],” Mark Recchi, who sat in the front row of the press conference with teammates Zdeno Chara and Patrice Bergeron, said. “Concussions are tough. ‘€¦ There’s got to be some thoughts. He’s got three young children, and you want to play with them, you want to have fun with them, you want to [seem them] grow up and be a good dad. Part of that is that you want to be healthy for them.

“I think he’s got a lot to think about, but I think the most important thing is right now that focuses on just getting better. Getting healthy, and then he can be a little bit more clear on his decisions and whether he wants to continue or not.”

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Bruins to hold press conference for Marc Savard

02.07.11 at 10:18 am ET
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With multiple reports indicating Sunday that Bruins center Marc Savard will be shut down for the rest of the season, the team called a press conference for Monday at 2 p.m. at TD Garden. Present at the press conference will be the center, general manager Peter Chiarelli, and head team physician Dr. Peter Asnis.

Savard suffered the fourth concussion of his career on Jan. 22 when he took a hit in the corner from Avalanche defenseman Matt Hunwick and has been out since. The 33-year-old, who missed the first 23 games of the season with post-concussion syndrome, had 10 points (2 G, 8 A) and a team-worst minus-7 rating in 25 games with the Bruins this season.

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Logan Couture ‘most complete player’ Joe Thornton has ever seen

02.05.11 at 7:05 pm ET
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All things are relative, but ask Joe Thornton and he’ll tell you that red-hot rookie center Logan Couture is not just the best player for his age that’s he’s ever played with, but the player he’s seen with so little NHL experience.

How little? The ninth overall pick in the 2007 draft is still just 21 years old. Saturday marked his 75th game in the league but just his 50th this season, and he is still considered a rookie in the eyes of the NHL.

With his game-winning power-play backhander past Tim Thomas in the first period on Saturday, Couture has 23 goals and 11 assists in 50 games. And to think the Bruins could have had him in that 2007 draft.

Instead, with the eighth pick, the Bruins selected Zach Hamill, the same Zach Hamill who was playing just his second NHL game on Saturday, first this season.

“Actually, it almost felt like my first game but at the same time I got into the speed of it the guys in the room helped me out a little bit to calm me down but it was good,” Hamill said.

It’s Couture who has been going at full tilt for the entire season, leading all NHL rookies in goals at 23. And since Couture only played in 25 regular season games at the NHL level last year, he’s still eligible for Calder Trophy consideration.

‘€œHe’€™s the most complete player that I’€™ve seen at that age,” Thornton said. “He penalty kills, he plays power play and plays all the important minutes. By far, the Calder winner so far this year.’€ Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Joe Thornton, Logan Couture, NHL

Bruins struggle on power play in loss to Sharks

02.05.11 at 4:59 pm ET
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On the Bruins’€™ first power play of Saturday’€™s 2-0 loss to the Sharks, Milan Lucic had a golden opportunity to tie the game up. A Zdeno Chara one-timer led to a rebound at the left side of the net and gave Lucic a brief look at an open cage. Unfortunately for the Bruins, Lucic’€™s bid went wide right.

That was the closest the Bruins would get on the power play, as they ultimately finished the game 0-for-4 on the man advantage. Not only did they fail to get another great look on their final three power plays, but they struggled to even get set up in the offensive zone.

‘€œOur power play tonight had a tough time,’€ said coach Claude Julien. ‘€œTonight was probably one of the tougher times we’€™ve had at getting the puck in. When we did get it in, we weren’€™t winning those battles for loose pucks and they kept shooting it back down the ice. That was probably, to me, the biggest difference in tonight’€™s game.’€

The Bruins have now gone 0-for-12 on the power play over their last five games and 1-for-19 over their last seven. Julien said Saturday’€™s problems with getting organized and maintaining possession don’€™t really reflect how the power play has performed lately, though.

‘€œI think the other night against Dallas, even though we didn’€™t score, our power play was good,’€ Julien said. ‘€œWe moved the puck well and we had some chances and we didn’€™t score. ‘€¦ So we really felt our power play had taken a stride in the right direction. Tonight was a totally different case. We weren’€™t good enough in that area. This is our best players having to be at their best.’€

Julien credited the Sharks with doing a good job on the penalty kill, but he also said his players could’€™ve made better decisions with the puck to try and overcome that.

‘€œThey were here the other night watching us, obviously, and they made some adjustments with their PK,’€ Julien said. ‘€œAt the same time, we still have other options, and I don’€™t think our guys always took the best options. Consequently, we weren’€™t getting in clean.’€

As much as the power play struggled, David Krejci said he liked some of the chances the Bruins generated on it in the first period. He also said he thinks it has looked pretty good lately despite the dearth of goals.

He pointed out that if Lucic’€™s rebound bid had gone in instead of going wide, he probably wouldn’€™t have to answer questions about the power play’€™s struggles.

‘€œIf that goes in,’€ Krejci said, ‘€œit would be a different game and we wouldn’€™t be talking about how the power play was bad tonight.’€

Read More: Claude Julien, David Krejci, Milan Lucic,

David Krejci stuck with wrong sticks

02.05.11 at 4:38 pm ET
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David Krejci knows that after the B’s were shut out Saturday, it’s in his hands to keep the top line producing. Right now, he just doesn’t like what’s in his hands.

Krejci, who has a contract with Bauer, has been in a bit of an unusual spot over the last couple of games. An issue with manufacturing the stick he uses each night has left him using a stick he’s had trouble getting a feel for.

“This stick sucks, and that’s all I’ve got,” Krejci, in his usual calm demeanor, said after Saturday’s game. “You can put it up on TV or in the papers. I don’t care. This stick sucks.”

The irony in the situation, of course, is that Krejci is a happy user of Bauer and loves the stick that he usually plays with. The problem is that the factory that manufactures his stick, for whatever reason, will not be able to produce his model of choice again until Feb. 11, and as a result, he’s left with the type he used to use earlier in his career.

“We ordered the sticks, my guy said they were coming [when] he ordered them,” the center said. “The trainers called them again because they didn’t come in the mail and they said, ‘Oh yeah, we’ve closed the factory and we’re going to open it up again. We’re not making any sticks until Feb. 11,’ so they sent me the sticks that I used to use a long time ago.”

Krejci fell out of love with the stick when he used them earlier in his career, but it seems he’ll have to get used to them over the next few games.

“That was the reason why I changed from those sticks to the new ones I’m using, because I don’t like these ones,” he said. “I changed them because I didn’t like them anymore, but [now] it’s the only thing I can have.”

Krejci hasn’t scored in 19 games, though he has five assists over his last six games. The center, who is accountable when it comes to his game, stressed that he wasn’t talking about his own performance or suggesting that his unhappiness with the stick has hurt his play.

“I’m not making excuses for my game,” Krejci said. “I just don’t like that stick. That’s all it is.”

This isn’t the first time a Bruins player has had a peculiar hangup regarding equipment. Blake Wheeler had issues with his skates last season before switching to CCM for this season.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, David Krejci,
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