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Unlike fans, Bruins and Lightning aren’t thrilled with 11-goal game

05.18.11 at 1:49 am ET
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Savor the 11-goal thriller while you can, because it’€™s probably not going to happen again. The Bruins and Lightning entered this series as the top two defensive teams in the postseason. High-scoring games like Tuesday night’€™s Game 2 are not their preference.

‘€œTo be honest with you, it was a pond game tonight,’€ Lightning coach Guy Boucher said. ‘€œWhen you play a pond hockey game, there is a chance that it won’€™t turn your way. It’€™s your breakaway, it’€™s my breakaway. It’€™s your 2-on-1, it’€™s my 2-on-1. It might be exciting for the fans, but from the teams’€™ perspective and standpoint, it’€™s not how we have played.’€

The Bruins were obviously happy to get the win, but coach Claude Julien acknowledged that he wasn’€™t particularly thrilled with how wide-open the game was, either.

‘€œNot the way it opened up to the point that there were breakaways,’€ Julien said. ‘€œWhen two teams start the series and they are two of the best defensive teams in the playoffs, and then you see a game like this, I don’€™t think anybody’€™s happy. We want to score goals, there’€™s no doubt there, but the way we’€™ve been giving up goals is not something that we’€™re proud of right now.’€

The Lightning players said the anomaly of a game was due in part to a breakdown of their defense-first structure. Forward Vincent Lecavalier said the Bruins did a good job using their speed to exploit those breakdowns.

‘€œWe didn’€™t play the way we usually do with our structure,’€ Lecavalier said. ‘€œI don’€™t want to take credit away from the Bruins. I thought they came out flying in the first and second. ‘€¦ Giving up five goals in that second period was tough. It seems every time we had a good chance, it would just come back. I think we just gave them a lot in the second, but they were skating. They were playing hard.’€

Now the focus for both teams in the lead-up to Thursday’€™s Game 3 will be to get back to playing the type of defense that got them here, and to not allow as many odd-man rushes and quality scoring chances as they did Tuesday.

‘€œReally for both teams it was a strange game,’€ said Bruins forward Mark Recchi. ‘€œI expect it to be much different when we both go back down there, to be the style we both usually play. It will be hard, another close one coming up, so we have a lot of work to do.’€

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Guy Boucher, Mark Recchi

Claude Julien: ‘Sloppy’ Bruins were ‘hanging on’

05.18.11 at 1:36 am ET
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While the Bruins were hanging on for dear life, coach Claude Julien admitted to feeling exactly was every Bruins fan was feeling watching the third period of Tuesday night’s Game 2 win over the Lightning at TD Garden. The Bruins were lucky to get away with a 6-5 regulation win to even the Eastern Conference final at one game apiece.

“I don’€™t think anybody in that dressing room is extremely happy with our game because we got sloppy at times,” Julien said of his team’s defense after building a 6-3 lead heading into the final period. “And we turned pucks over and weren’€™t strong on in the third period. But there’€™s no doubt we were hanging on. And thank God time was on our side and we came up with the win. So we need to regroup here, take the win for what it is in the playoffs, and know that we got to get better.

“When two teams start the series and they are two of the best defensive teams in the playoffs and then you see a game like this, I don’€™t think anybody’€™s happy. We want to score goals, there’€™s no doubt there. But the way we’€™ve been giving up goals is not something that we’€™re proud of right now. And we need to be better in regards to that.”

Julien also hinted that the play of Tyler Seguin and Michael Ryder could coincide with the return of Patrice Bergeron in Game 3. Bergeron missed the first two games of the series with a mild concussion. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, NHL

Video: Bruins beat Lightning in Game 2

05.18.11 at 1:35 am ET
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Read More: Brad Marchand, Mark Recchi, Tim Thomas, Tyler Seguin

Tyler Seguin is on the right end of the learning curve

05.18.11 at 12:53 am ET
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Following one of the most stunning playoff performances by a rookie in Bruins history, 19-year-old Tyler Seguin took it all in stride. Seguin, playing in just his second playoff game after the concussion to Patrice Bergeron at the end of the second round, took over and amazed the TD Garden crowd with a second period performance for the ages.

“It’€™s definitely tough watching from above,” Seguin said of his vantage point as a healthy scratch from the press box in the first two rounds. “I try to take everything in and learn as much as I can, but it’€™s hard sitting there and not being able to help the boys. I wanted to take advantage of every opportunity I got.”

After scoring a goal and an assist his first playoff opportunity in Game 1 Saturday night, Seguin took over in the second period with the Bruins down, 2-1. He scored the first of his two second-period goals 48 seconds in to tie the game. He would add another goal while setting up both of Michael Ryder‘s second-period tallies.

“I think it’€™s just the learning curve,” Seguin said. “It’€™s been a whole learning curve all year. As the year went on, I’€™ve felt more confident and more poised. In big games, I always want to step up. Tonight, I had some lucky bounces, but I was trying to take advantage of all the opportunities and they were going in tonight.”

And to think he was snubbed by the mighty Canadian World Junior team in 2010, presumably because the coaching and development staff didn’t think he was ready to put his talent all together on the world stage. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, NHL, Tampa Bay Lightning

Tyler Seguin lights up Lightning, Bruins tie series

05.17.11 at 10:57 pm ET
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By DJ Bean and Scott McLaughlin

It was the Tyler Seguin Show Tuesday, as the rookie had a four-point showing in a 6-5 Bruins win over the Lightning at the TD Garden that tied the Eastern Conference finals at one game apiece.

Seguin scored two goals, tying the game 48 seconds into the second period, and giving the B’s a 4-2 lead at 6:30 of the second. Michael Ryder also had two goals for the Bruins, both of which were assisted by Seguin. Nathan Horton and David Krejci also scored for the Bruins. Horton and Krejci are now tied for the team lead with six goals this postseason.

The B’s chased Lightning goaltender Dwayne Roloson after two periods and six goals. It was the first time this postseason that Roloson allowed more than three goals. Tampa got its scoring from Adam Hall, Martin St. Louis, Vincent Lecavalier, Steven Stamkos and Dominic Moore. They came back from a 6-3 deficit to make it 6-5 in the third, but in the end Tim Thomas and the Bruins held on.

The teams now travel to Tampa, where they will play Games 3 and 4 before returning to Boston next week for Game 5.


– Everyone knew Seguin had all the talent in the world, but nobody expected the type of explosion that was displayed Tuesday. The 19-year-old’s pair of flashy goals made for his second and third tallies of the series. On his first goal, he blew by a pair of Lightning defenders and beat a sprawling Roloson with a nifty forehand-backhand move. Six minutes later, just moments after Thomas stoned Ryan Malone on a breakaway, Seguin rifled a shot under the crossbar to give the B’s a 4-2 lead. He would contribute assists on a pair of Michael Ryder goals in the period (one of which game on — gasp — the power play) to cap an impressive four-point second period.

With six points in two games this postseason, Seguin now has half the points of Patrice Bergeron, who entered the game leading the team with 12 points.

Milan Lucic has hardly been a force to be reckoned with this postseason, and after taking a Seguin shot off the right foot Monday and missing Tuesday’s skate, his impact on Game 2 was something many were keeping an eye on. Amidst all that, he came out like a man possessed. Lucic had four shots on goal in the first period, which had already made for his second-highest total of the postseason. Lucic played a big role in the team’s power play goal, screening Roloson alongside Horton, who tipped it in.

– As bad as the opening and closing seconds of it were, the Bruins absolutely dominated play in the first period. Though the Lightning got 11 shots on Tim Thomas, the puck possession swayed heavily in favor of the Bruins, whose nonstop possession in the offensive zone for two shifts without the puck leaving the zone caused Tampa coach Guy Boucher to call a timeout at 5:52 despite his team holding a 1-0 lead.

– The Bruins had two power-play goals in the entire postseason entering Tuesday night. They doubled that with a pair of tallies on the man advantage in Game 2. After Roloson stood on his head to deny the Bruins on an extended 5-on-3, Kaberle set up a Seidenberg one-timer that Horton deflected home with one second left on the 5-on-4. Then in the second period, Ryder collected a rebound off a Seguin shot and backhanded the puck past Roloson to make it 5-3. Perhaps just as important as the goals themselves was the fact that the power play looked good all game long. The Bruins got set up with relative ease, made clean passes and created one scoring chance after another.


– The Bruins dominated the vast majority of the first period, but a pair of breakdowns at each end of the frame left them trailing at the intermission. The Lightning scored just 13 seconds into the game when Lecavalier sent a shot wide and Hall beat a pair of Bruins to the left doorstep and banged home the rebound. After getting outworked for the next 19-plus minutes, the Lightning struck again with just 6.5 seconds left in the period when St. Louis beat Johnny Boychuk to the front of the net and tipped in Stamkos’ centering pass.

– As explosive as they were offensively, there is still a bit of sloppiness they need to clean up. Boychuk nearly gave the Lightning a goal in the first period by banking an intended pass off Tomas Kaberle in front of the net. The Lightning’s second goal went off Boychuk’s skate, and he looked bad on Stamkos’ goal as well. Kaberle made things dangerous for Krejci with a buddy pass when breaking out of the Bruins’ zone. The Lightning also had a pair of breakaways, though Thomas stopped them both.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Tyler Seguin,

Bruins/Lightning Game 2 Live Blog: Tyler Seguin has four-points, B’s lead 6-5 in third

05.17.11 at 7:36 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia, Rob Bradford, Joey the Fish, and a cast of others as the B’s look to even the Eastern Conference finals in Game 2 vs. the Lightning.

Bruins/Lightning Game 2 Live Blog

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs,

Marc Savard to attend Game 2

05.17.11 at 7:04 pm ET
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Bruins center Marc Savard will be at Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals between the B’s and Lightning, marking his first return to TD Garden since being shut down for the season on Feb. 7.

Savard is dealing with post-concussion syndrome following a clean hit from former teammate Matt Hunwick on Jan. 22 in Colorado. Since being shut down for the regular season and playoffs, Savard has stayed at home in Peterborough, Ontario. The 33-year-old had two goals and eight assists for 10 points in 25 games this year. He began the season on long-term injured reserve due to PCS from the hit he took last March 7 from Penguins forward Matt Cooke.

Savard will not be available to the media.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Marc Savard, Matt Cooke, Matt Hunwick
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