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Peter Chiarelli happy he didn’t trade Tim Thomas

06.17.11 at 1:19 pm ET
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Bruins goaltender Tim Thomas was a popular guy last offseason, as he was brought up in trade rumors, some of which were falsely reported. Though the goalie was never going to Philadelphia in exchange for Simon Gagne, Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said Friday at TD Garden that he did have talks with other teams about Thomas, who was coming off hip surgery, had lost his starting job to Tuukka Rask and at the time had three years of a $5 million annual cap hit left on his deal.

“At the time there was kind of a mutually agreement between myself and Tim and Bill Zito, Tim’€™s agent, just to explore it and on the premise that Tim does not want to leave Boston,” Chiarelli said of trading Thomas. “And that’€™s really where it ended. It’€™s really where it ended. And there was some calls in that and they kept him in the loop at all times and he kept stressing he didn’€™t want to leave. I said ‘I know, let’€™s just look at this very briefly.’ And I know there are a lot of stories that flowed from it, but I can’€™t stress enough the fact that Tim never wanted to leave.

“I wouldn’€™t be doing my job if I at least didn’€™t look at some things, and I did. You go through those things, on a number of fronts on a number of fronts, on a number of players. You just field stuff, you look at them, you talk to other teams. And at the end of the day you make the decision yay or nay. And here it was nay. And it was an easy nay.”

Thomas ended up reclaiming the starting job, turning in a shutout in his first start of the season Oct. 10 in Prague against the Coyotes. He ended up allowing just three goals in six starts in October, and even after leveling out was still dominant throughout a season that will undoubtedly earn him his second Vezina trophy in Vegas next week. His .938 save percentage is the best for a goalie in a single season since the stat has been recorded.

Thomas was also named the Conn Smythe trophy winner after the Stanley Cup finals concluded. The award is given to the player most valuable to his team during the playoffs, and Thomas clearly proved that by allowing just eight goals in the seven-game series vs. the Canucks.

Thomas, 37, has two years with a $5 million cap hit left on his contract.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Peter Chiarelli, Stanley Cup Finals, Tim Thomas

Marc Savard to attend parade, Peter Chiarelli hopes to get Savard and Steven Kampfer on Stanley Cup

06.17.11 at 12:16 pm ET
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Bruins center Marc Savard, who suffered his second concussion in as many years this season and is dealing with post-concussion syndrome, will be at Saturday’s rolling rally in celebration of the team’s Stanley Cup victory, according to general manager Peter Chiarelli.

Given that Savard played in only 25 games before a clean hit from former teammate Matt Hunwick ended his season, the two-time All-Star does not qualify to have his name on the Stanley Cup. A player must play in either at least 41 regular-season games or one Stanley Cup finals game to have his name engraved on the trophy. There is a petitioning process, however, and Chiarelli plans on petitioning to get Savard and defenseman Steven Kampfer, who just missed the cutoff by playing in 38 regular-season games, on the Cup.

“I don’€™t know what the process is,” Chiarelli admitted. “I’€™ve given it a little bit of thought. Certainly those two deserve to be on it, so we’€™ll see what we can do to get them on it and go from there.”

Peter Chiarelli says Nathan Horton was playing with separated shoulder

06.17.11 at 12:00 pm ET
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Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said Friday at TD Garden that even before being severely concussed on a headshot from Vancouver’s Aaron Rome in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals, first-line winger Nathan Horton was playing hurt for the Bruins. Horton, who had three game-winning goals in the postseason, two of which clinched series, had been playing with a separated shoulder, according to the GM.

“Well I know Nathan, before he was hurt with his concussion was actually hurt. He had a serious separated shoulder,” Chiarelli said, adding that Horton was “hurt significantly.”

Horton had eight goals and nine assists for 17 points in the postseason, his first experience in the playoffs.

Chiarelli added that he considered the B’s lucky for their lack of injuries suffered by players.

“I think we’€™ll only have one, maybe two, surgeries and we’€™ll get that out there when I get all the information,” Chiarelli said. “But we’€™ve had our guys dinged up, and all teams do, like Vancouver did and Tampa did and Philly did. Montreal did. I think what I can say about the injury front is we were fortunate from that perspective. And again when you look back at past winners, I remember the one year Tampa won I think they had like twenty man-games lost due to injury the whole year in the playoffs. So you have to have an element of luck. And on that front we certainly did.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Nathan Horton, Peter Chiarelli, Stanley Cup Finals

Bruins championship parade route set for Saturday

06.16.11 at 6:23 pm ET
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The city of Boston has released details for Saturday’s parade that will honor the Bruins for winning the Stanley Cup.

The route will begin at TD Garden at 11 a.m. and work its way through the city beginning on Causeway St. The team will travel on Duck Boats past City Hall Plaza and the Common before ending at Copley Plaza on Boylston St.

Parking restrictions across the city will be heavily enforced in the vicinity of the closed off parade route streets and fans are strongly encouraged to use public transportation. To accommodate the celebration, vehicular traffic will be banned along the parade route beginning at 9 a.m. until the conclusion of the parade at about 1 p.m.

Temporary parking restrictions will be put into effect at several locations throughout the city and vehicles parked in violation will be ticketed and/or towed. Temporary ‘€œTow Zone No Stopping Boston Police Special Event Saturday’€ regulations will be posted at the following locations:
‘€¢    Canal Street, from Causeway Street to New Chardon Street
‘€¢    Friend Street, from Causeway Street to New Chardon Street
‘€¢    Portland Street, from Merrimac Street to Causeway Street
‘€¢    Lancaster Street,  from Causeway Street to Merrimac Street
‘€¢    Merrimac Street , from Causeway Street to Lancaster Street
‘€¢    Causeway Street, from North Washington Street to Merrimac Street
‘€¢    Staniford Street, from Causeway Street to Cambridge Street
‘€¢    Cambridge Street, from Hancock Street to Tremont Street
‘€¢    Tremont Street, from Cambridge Street to Boylston Street
‘€¢    Boylston Street, from Washington Street to Dalton Street
‘€¢    New Chardon Street, from Cambridge Street to Merrimac Street
‘€¢    Bowdoin Street, from Cambridge Street to Derne Street
‘€¢    Somerset Street, from Cambridge Street to Ashburton Place
‘€¢    New Sudbury Street, from Cambridge Street to Bulfinch Place
‘€¢    Court Street, from Cambridge Street to Court Square
‘€¢    Beacon Street, from Tremont Street to Somerset Street
‘€¢    Bromfield Street, from Province Street to Tremont Street
‘€¢    Park Street, from Tremont Street to Beacon Street
‘€¢    Temple Place, from Tremont Street to Washington Street
‘€¢    West Street, from Tremont Street to Washington Street
‘€¢    Essex Street, from Tremont Street to Washington Street
‘€¢    Charles Street South, from Park Plaza to Center gate of Public Garden
‘€¢    Hadassah Way, from Boylston Street to Park Plaza
‘€¢    Berkeley Street, from St. James Avenue to Newbury Street
‘€¢    Clarendon Street, from Newbury Street to St. James Avenue
‘€¢    Dartmouth Street, from Boylston Street to Newbury Street
‘€¢    St. James Avenue, from Clarendon Street to Dartmouth Street

Read More: Parade,

The day after the Cup, 6 p.m.: Recap of Bruins talk on The Big Show

06.16.11 at 6:00 pm ET
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Glenn Ordway, Michael Holley and Mikey Adams were given plenty of material for Thursday’s Big Show when the Bruins won the Stanley Cup the night before. Here’s a brief recap of all the Bruins talk from 2-6 p.m:

–The guys played an awesome compilation of the four championship calls from the Bruins, Red Sox, Celtics and Patriots from the last decade.

Jack Edwards shared a story about seeing a “soft” Henrik Sedin T-shirt for sale at the Vancouver airport.

NBC sideline reporter Pierre McGuire told the guys that he believed the Canucks had chemistry issues in Game 7, saying “”Coaches overreacting. I thought in the case of Alain Vingeault when the frustration set in, and the composure and the focus and basically every one of the Bruins players acting as coach. It was really an interesting dynamic to witness.”

Kevin Paul Dupont of The Boston Globe called in from Minnesota when he was returning from Vancouver. He said he thought the hit on Nathan Horton in Game 3 signaled the turning point in the finals but perhaps not for the reasons you’d think. “I didn’€™t see it so much as, ‘€˜Let’€™s do it for Horton.’€™ There’€™s always that element no matter what the injury, but I had a sense of a couple of things in the immediate minutes after it, which was Vancouver began to play small. They got afraid. Their skilled players were afraid because you know in those instances there has to be a payback.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Champions, The Big Show,

The day after the Cup, 5 p.m.: The most memorable moments from B’s playoff run

06.16.11 at 5:00 pm ET
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The Bruins’ Stanley Cup victory signals not only the resurgence of hockey in the Hub but also the unfortunate end to the 2010-11 hockey season. That may have some already feeling nostalgic about this historic run to the Cup. But no worries, you can relive each of the Bruins’ most memorable moments from these playoffs in each of the clips below and after the jump.

Eastern Conference quarters vs. Canadiens

Jack Edwards screams ‘€œGet Up!’€ to Roman Hamrlik in Game 3

Tim Thomas makes game-saving stop, Nathan Horton scores first game-winner in double OT of Game 5

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Champions,

The day after the Cup, 4 p.m.: The Big Show talks with Kevin Paul Dupont

06.16.11 at 3:59 pm ET
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Kevin Paul Dupont of The Boston Globe, a regular contributor down the stretch for the program, called into The Big Show to give his expert take on the Bruins Stanley Cup victory and precisely how the team got there in the first place. Dupont saw Aaron Rome‘s suspension-worthy hit on Nathan Horton as the point where the finals began to take a turn toward the Bruins side.

“The turning point of the season was the hit on Horton,” he said. “I didn’t see it so much as, ‘Let’s do it for Horton.’ There’s always that element no matter what the injury, but I had a sense of a couple of things in the immediate minutes after it, which was Vancouver began to play small. They got afraid. Their skilled players were afraid because you know in those instances there has to be a payback. It wasn’t the traditional payback of the years of my youth of the 60s, 70s and even into the 80s which was grab two or three finesse guys and beat the hinges off of them. Instead, the thought was at least from a competitive standpoint, just get in their face, be relentless. And other than that one next game in Vancouver, they were that. They played effectively. They played punishingly. They stayed on them on every shift. We saw the shrinking of Vancouver.”

While others seemed ready to call Claude Julien vindicated after several in both the stands and the media, Dupont wanted to make sure fans didn’t forget about team owner Jeremy Jacobs. Although he’s been seen a villain in Boston sports lore over the years, Dupont noted that B’s fans could have been much worse.

“Has the guy spent? Yes he has. Is the guy reliable? Has there ever been a question about payroll in this town, which I know a lot of people take for granted? I can show you a lot of NHL cities where you can’t take that for granted. He’s never bitched and moaned about the money. He’s never tried to hold up the city for another dime for development on Causeway St. … Is he vindicated? I don’t know if he’s vindicated. He is rewarded. He has spent a lot of money. He has been rewarded even though being an out-of-town citizen. I think from a business standpoint, he’s been a very good citizen.”

Before leaving, Dupont wanted to make sure he praised the city of Boston for not being as violent in their celebrations as Vancouver was in its riots Wednesday night.

“Good on that,” he said. “It took us, what, 400 years in Boston to learn how to drink and party?”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Champions, Kevin Paul Dupont,

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