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Pierre McGuire on MFB: ‘Zdeno [Chara] is not the same player that he was’

03.26.15 at 2:00 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire made his weekly appearance Thursday on Middays with MFB to discuss the Bruins and their run to make the playoffs. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

Part of the struggles for the Bruins this season has been the play of defensemen Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg. McGuire feels Chara isn’t the same player as he’s been in the past, as he is now 38 years old.

Zdeno [Chara] is not the same player that he was,” McGuire said. “He’s having a harder time maintaining lots of ice time. He’s making mistakes we’re not used to seeing him make in terms of turnovers below the goal line from the hash mark down to the goal line. He’s losing guys in coverage. Getting beat wide which we haven’t seen a lot of him over the years because of that long stick.

“I don’t think he has the quickness in confined areas that he used to have and again, that doesn’t mean he can’t get it back, but it hasn’t been there for him and I am huge a Dennis Seidenberg fan and Dennis has not been the same player and I think a lot of that is because of injury more than anything else, I really believe that.”

David Krejci is likely to return to the lineup Thursday night, and the Bruins now need to find a place for him to play. McGuire says it will be an “experiment” to see where exactly he will fit in and on which line.

“I think it’s going to be an experiment,” McGuire said. “I think you’re going to take your time. I don’t think you want take away Ryan Spooner’s ice time. You don’t want to take [Patrice] Bergeron‘s ice time. You need [Carl] Soderberg to deliver for you and Gregory Campbell plays a different role. It is going to be very interesting to see how they do it. I probably would start him playing on the wing with Bergeron just because he won’t have to do a lot of the defensive heavy lifting that a center man has to do because he has Patrice there to help him out and it’s an easier position to play up high. We’ll see. Let’s be honest, Reilly Smith would be the first person to tell you he has not had a sterling season.”

As for the current status of the team, the Bruins are currently out of the playoffs in ninth place in the Eastern Conference, a point behind the Senators for the final spot. With nine games left in the regular-season, the team will need to get things going in a hurry in order to make the postseason.

“It’s not going well for them at all,” said McGuire. “There will be a lot of people watching the scoreboard tonight between Anaheim and Boston. This is not the position I’ll say just me in particular, I never thought the Bruins would be in this position. Even though I knew they would have a hard time replacing Jarome’s [Iginla] 30 goals, and he’s at 25 this year playing on a Colorado team that won’t make the playoffs and doesn’t have nearly the fire power that Boston does. But, he’s going to get 30 again, so replacing his 30 I thought would be tough and the Johnny Boychuk stuff would be tough, but I thought they would find a way doing it by committee, but they haven’t been able to do it. It’s been very disappointing.”

Read More: David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Pierre McGuire, Zdeno Chara

Brett Connolly progressing, hopes to return before end of regular season

03.26.15 at 12:15 pm ET
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Brett Connolly

Brett Connolly

Bruins right wing Brett Connolly was initially expected to miss six weeks after a Dennis Seidenberg wrist shot left him with a broken finger in his second practice as a member of the Bruins earlier this month. On Thursday, Connolly skated with his teammates for the first time since the injury, following one order.

“Stay away from Seids,” Connolly recalled his teammates warning him.

Now that the initial despair from Connolly’€™s bad luck has turned into something he can joke about, his attention has been turned to an eventual return — or debut, rather — that could come sooner than initially thought.

After getting back on the ice last Monday and working extensively with strength and conditioning coach John Whitesides, Connolly’€™s progress from his surgically-repaired finger is apparent. Though he hasn’t taken contact, he’€™s handling the puck and shooting. Connolly is not yet taking slap shots, but slappers aren’€™t a priority for the right wing. Once he feels he can properly grip the stick (he says his comfort level there is at 60 percent), be able to fire wristers and snap shots to the best of his abilities and participate in battle drills, he wants to play.

Ideally, Connolly said he would be back able to play again in the final week of the regular season.

“I hope so,” he said of a regular-season return. “I’€™m not too sure yet. My timetable, I know I’€™m getting closer, so I’€™m expecting to be back a few games before this regular season [ends], but we’€™ll see.”

Claude Julien wasn’€™t overly forthright regarding Connolly’€™s timetable and whether he’€™s ahead of schedule. He did say the Bruins have been encouraged with what they’€™ve seen from the 22-year-old and that they’€™re eager to see him play.

The acquisition of Connolly at the trade deadline was an intriguing one for the Bruins. Though trading for the former sixth overall pick (and restricted free agent to-be) was more of a hockey deal for future seasons than a typical deadline acquisition, he was expected to slot into the lineup as a potential top-six right for the B’€™s down the stretch.

That obviously hasn’€™t happened, and Connolly has instead experienced a slow acclimation process to the team and the city. The Bruins are not yet bringing him on road trips, but Connolly said he’€™s established good relationships with his teammates, even if he’€™s spent more time with Whitesides than with any actual players.

“I’€™ve been here for almost a month, so the guys have been great,” Connolly said. “I’€™ve gotten comfortable with not only guys, but the city and knowing your way around, knowing your way to the practice facility and things like that. Just little things that make you a little bit more comfortable. It’€™s obviously not been the three weeks I would have envisioned, but I’€™ve gotten to know the city a little bit, get to know my teammates a little bit better.

“I’€™m excited to play that first game. Obviously we’€™re in a playoff hunt, so I’€™m looking to get back out there as soon as I can.”

Read More: Brett Connolly, Dennis Seidenberg,

David Krejci probable to return for Bruins vs. Ducks

03.26.15 at 11:37 am ET
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David Krejci will take warmups and is “probable” to play Thursday night against the Ducks, Claude Julien said after the Bruins’€™ morning skate.

Krejci, who has missed the last 15 games with a partially torn MCL, will play right wing on Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line according to line rushes in morning skate.

Tuukka Rask is expected to start against the Ducks. Boston’€™s lineup in morning skate was as follows:




For more Bruins news, visit

Read More: David Krejci,

David Krejci replaces Dougie Hamilton on power play in practice

03.25.15 at 11:17 am ET
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WILMINGTON — The Bruins practiced for over an hour Wednesday, a rarity this late in the season, but it did mean David Krejci got in a significant workday as he aims to return to Boston’s lineup.

Following the practice, Krejci said “we’ll see” when asked if he could return Thursday. In a positive sign that he could be a go against the Ducks, Krejci practiced on the Bruins’€™ first power play unit.

Krejci took the spot of Dougie Hamilton, who is out for multiple weeks with an upper-body injury. Ryan Spooner, who initially replaced Krejci on the power play following Krejci’€™s torn MCL, remains on the first unit.

The power play units were as follows:


Eriksson, Bergeron, Spooner


Lucic, Soderberberg, Pastrnak

As for the extra-long practice, Claude Julien didn’t sound too worried about overworking his players ahead of a critical three games in four days.

“We’€™re fortunate that have that,” Julien said of his team’s practice days. “There’€™s certain areas that we wanted to kind of work on, and it gave us that opportunity.”

Boston’€™s lines and defense pairings were unchanged from Tuesday’€™s practice:

Marchand-Bergeron-Krejci (Paille)
Kelly-Campbell-Talbot (Ferlin)


Read More: David Krejci, Dougie Hamilton,

Bruins need a productive and confident Reilly Smith

03.24.15 at 10:23 pm ET
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Reilly Smith is capable of more. (Getty Images)

Reilly Smith is capable of more. (Getty Images)

If Brett Connolly hadn’€™t broken his finger, rendering him a non-factor down the stretch before he ever played a game for the Bruins, maybe the Reilly Smith problem wouldn’€™t matter as much as it does.

If Connolly were healthy and in the lineup, he would provide the B’€™s with a viable option to take Smith’€™s minutes and, with any hope, do more with them than Smith has.

Connolly isn’€™t there, however, and the Bruins’€™ playoff chances are slipping away while Smith’€™s confidence is seemingly nowhere to be found. On a team loaded with players who can run hot and cold, Smith has been at his coldest at the worst time imaginable.

The Bruins need the Smith of early last season and last postseason. The current Smith — the one who has no goals in his last 13 games and only 12 this season despite playing most of the year with one of the best centers in the world in Patrice Bergeron — needs to access the smarts and mindset that have previously made him a good top-sixer. It’€™s anyone’€™s guess as to whether that happens down the stretch, including him.

“I think you try to build it every day,” Smith said when asked if his confidence is where it needs to be. “Obviously when the team’€™s struggling and things aren’€™t working out, your confidence isn’€™t going to be as high as it usually is, but it’€™s something you’€™ve got to kind of work around.”

Smith missed the first game of his two-year Bruins career on Saturday when he was made a healthy scratch against the Panthers. Uninspired play — most notably a dreadful showing against the Senators last Thursday in which he had two turnovers that led to goals and was given just one shift over the final 28:03 — led to the benching, but he was back in the lineup the next day. Smith picked up an assist on Zdeno Chara‘€™s third-period power play goal against the Lightning, good for just his first point in seven games.

Tuesday’€™s practice saw Smith skate with Carl Soderberg and Loui Eriksson, while David Krejci held Smith’€™s usual spot to the right of Patrice Bergeron. Krejci playing with Marchand and Bergeron makes for a loaded first line, but the Bruins have historically had success with balance throughout their top three lines, if not all four.

That means that Smith needs to start producing regardless of where he plays. Even when Connolly returns, the prospects of him contributing are worse than they were prior to the injury, as finger injuries can still keep players off their games for a while after they return to action.

Four goals in 12 games. That’€™s what Smith brought to the table last postseason. It wasn’€™t anything remarkable, but it was consistent with his role. He’€™s been too quiet for too long this season, and he needs to find the aforementioned production to avoid being an easy scapegoat in a lost season.

“I think I can, and that’€™s obviously the goal, I think for everyone on this team,” Smith said. “These are a very important nine games coming up here at the end and we’€™re going to need our best effort coming from everyone. Anything you can do and anything extra is definitely going to go a long way in this stretch here.”

Read More: Reilly Smith,

Tuukka Rask: ‘I’ll play as many as I need to’

03.24.15 at 4:08 pm ET
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Tuukka Rask shouldn't expect to rest any time soon. (Getty Images)

Tuukka Rask shouldn’t expect to rest any time soon. (Getty Images)

WILMINGTON — As has been documented many a time, Tuukka Rask has been given much more work this season than he’€™s ever experienced. His 61 games played are already three more than he’€™d ever played in a regular season, and there are still nine games to go.

Rest be damned, the Bruins might need to start Rask in each and every one of those games, or until a playoff spot is secured if that happens at all. Without saying those exact words, Rask seemingly admitted as much Tuesday.

“Nobody cares about that now,” he said of potential fatigue. “We’€™re playing the most important games of the year. Obviously rest is important, but when it’€™s game time, it’€™s game time, and then you rest when you have a chance to rest.”

This season, Rask has for the most part been asked about two things: whether he’€™s tired and whether he’€™s had it with the product in front of him. At worst, Rask has been average this season, and at best he’€™s been brilliant. That’€™s better than most Bruins can say for themselves this season.

After Tampa scored their fourth goal in Sunday’€™s 5-3 win over the B’€™s, Rask gestured in frustration, as he has frequently this season. He said that while he’€™s frustrated that the team is losing, he’€™s trying to not let the team’€™s struggles get to him.

“I’€™ve been pretty even all season,” Rask said. “Obviously, it’€™s frustrating when you have these ups and downs. We play good and then we play really bad and we never seem to settle, so obviously it’€™s frustrating for everybody, but if I get too frustrated, then I’€™m just going to slip away from my game.”

The Bruins are in the midst of a three-day break between Sunday’€™s game and their next contest on Thursday against the Ducks. They have two more back-to-backs on their schedule and three three-in-fours. The team should be able to start their backup in a game like Sunday’s against the Hurricanes and be confident in winning, but maybe that’s too big a risk to take with a playoff spot on the line.

Rask said he’€™d be willing to play all nine games, even if he didn’€™t sound too enthusiastic about the idea.

“I don’€™t know. We’€™ll see how it goes,” he said. “I’€™ll play as many as I need to.”

As for what needs to get better in front of him to make his nights easier and the Bruins’€™ chances of securing a playoff spot greater, Rask said he couldn’€™t point to one specific issue.

“It’€™s just team defense,” Rask said. “There’€™s not one thing. When we defend as a unit and everybody does their job, I think that’€™s when we’€™re at our best. There’€™s not really one thing that we need to figure out more than everybody just playing together as a unit and defending in front of the net.”

Read More: Tuukka Rask,

David Krejci noncommittal about availability for Thursday

03.24.15 at 12:47 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — The Bruins need David Krejci back as soon as possible, but neither he nor the team is committing to his availability for Thursday’s game against the Ducks.

Krejci has been out since Feb. 20 with a partially torn MCL. Claude Julien had said last week that he was a possibility to return as early as last weekend’s games against the Panthers in Lightning, but Krejci remained out of the lineup. On Tuesday, Krejci skated as the right wing of Patrice Bergeron‘s line with Brad Marchand.

After the practice, Krejci was noncommittal regarding whether he could return for Thursday.

“It was a possibility last game, but I wasn’€™t able to,” Krejci said. “It’€™s a possibility for next game again.”

Krejci then went into Marshawn Lynch mode, repeating some variation of “it felt pretty good today” when asked whether the delay in returning to the lineup is due to him not being cleared or because he doesn’t feel ready.

Asked if the Bruins were still in “wait-and-see” mode with Krejci for Thursday, Claude Julien responded, “yes we are.”

Krejci has been limited to 38 games this season due to multiple lower-body injuries. He is third on the Bruins with 1.87 points per 60 minutes.

Read More: David Krejci,
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