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Dennis Seidenberg doesn’t feel disrespected by Dirk Nowitzki, hopes to be second German to win Cup

06.03.11 at 8:35 pm ET
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VANCOUVER ‘€“ The Bruins and Canucks were scoreless during Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals when an interesting video was played on the video board at Rogers Arena. It was Dallas Mavericks star Dirk Nowitzki, who had two messages, the first of which was ‘€œGo Canucks.’€ From there, he gave a shout-out to defenseman Christian Ehrhoff, whom he called ‘€œmy boy ‘€˜Hoff.’€

The connection was easy to make right off the bat. Both Nowitzki and Ehrhoff hail from Germany, and with both playing in the finals of their respective sports, it is an exciting time. Yet in endorsing one side of this matchup, Nowitzki may have slighted another German player in Bruins’€™ defenseman Dennis Seidenberg.

‘€œI talked to a German reporter, I talked to Dirk,’€ Seidenberg said Friday at the University of Vancouver. ‘€œThe Dallas Mavericks’€™ trainer is either a Vancouver fan or from Vancouver, I’m not sure. He always keeps him up to date, tells him stories. I guess that’s the reason he’s cheering for them.’€

If Nowitzki is a fan of German hockey players, he’€™s in a win-win scenario. Because both Ehrhoff and Seidenberg are in the series, one will become the second German player in NHL history to win the Stanley Cup. Prior to this series, only defenseman Uwe Krupp has won the Cup, which he did in 1996 as a member of the Avalanche. In that series, Krupp scored the Cup-clinching goal in triple overtime of Game 4 against the Panthers.

‘€œThere’s going to be a second German Stanley Cup champion after Uwe Krupp,’€ Ehrhoff said with a smile earlier this week. ‘€œThat’s definitely very special for German hockey. Hopefully it’s going to be me.’€

Ehrhoff and Seidenberg know both each other and Krupp very well. The two have played together on national teams since they were 17, and they were defensive partners in the Olympics last year under Krupp, the head coach of the national team.

Seidenberg said Krupp had wished him and Ehrhoff luck prior to the series. No. 44 has been perhaps the Bruins’€™ best defenseman throughout the playoffs, though it would take a lot for him to be able to top Krupp’€™s game-winner against John Vanbiesbrouck. Seidenberg remembers when Krupp became the first German player to win the Cup, even if he didn’€™t catch it live.

‘€œI was sleeping, but I watched it the next day, and I remember histshot from the point,’€ Seidenberg said with a laugh. ‘€œI remember the goal. It was pretty big back then, so it was exciting.’€

Though Ehrhoff and Seidenberg haven’€™t been in much contact with one another as they battle for the Stanley Cup, they are close with one another and have tried to see one another for dinner or coffee when their teams have met in past regular seasons.

‘€œWe’ve known each other since the Under-18 national team,’€ Ehrhoff said. ‘€œWe like each other, we understand each other well off the ice, but right now we’re not really talking. It has to wait until after.’€

Both players noted that there is a heightened interest in North American sports in Germany at the moment given that Nowitzki, Seidenberg and Ehrhoff all have a shot at a title. Ehrhoff said he’€™s spent plenty of time in interviews with radio stations back in Germany, and relatives of both defenseman have travelled or will travel to see it in person.

Either way, Germany will get its second Stanley Cup champion, but don’€™t expect either player to be happy with seeing the other guy do it.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Christian Ehrhoff, Dennis Seidenberg, Dirk Nowitzki

Only one game? Bruins’ first-liners feel slighted

06.03.11 at 7:22 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — The Bruins are three days into the Stanley Cup finals, and they’re already sick of the way it’s being perceived.

After losing Game 1 in a contest that was scoreless for all but 18.5 seconds, a couple of members of the Bruins’ first line made it clear Friday at the University of British Columbia that the press might not be giving them a fair enough shake.

“You know, it’s clear that you guys aren’t giving us much of a chance,” Milan Lucic said. “We’ve just got to do whatever we can to prove people wrong.”

The B’s top line has played against the Canucks’ second line of Ryan Kesler between Mason Raymond and Christopher Higgins. How the Bruins will deal with Kesler, a 41-goal-scorer in the regular season, has been a popular topic in the series. The series may be young, but Krejci is already sick of hearing about Kesler.

“He’s the best player in the world, right? That’s what it looks like,” Krejci said when asked about playing against Kesler. “That’s why everybody’s asking me about him. It’s not about him. Obviously, he’s a great player. He’s a really good player, but my game is to focus on my game and what I have to do, and not about other guys.”

Kesler poked a puck past Johnny Boychuk at the blue line Wednesday and hit Jannik Hansen with a pass, who then set up an easy Raffi Torres goal with Tim Thomas respecting Hansen’s shot. Krejci noted that for all the attention the second line receives, Kesler was playing with third-liners (the team was in the midst of a line change) on the game-winning goal, and that it was a closer game than he feels people are remembering.

“It was a zero-zero game all the way,” Krejci said. “You guys are making such a big deal that we lost. I mean, it could have gone either way. His line, I know he got an apple, but he was with the two other guys from another line.”

Krejci and Nathan Horton each had five shots on goal in Game 1, which tied for tops on the Bruins. Many of those shots came on the power play, but the play of the line in general was a strong point for the B’s on a night in which nobody could beat Roberto Luongo.

“It’s still good,” Krejci said. “We’d like to have over 10 shots every game, but I feel like we can maybe bring a little more to our game, especially create some chances. I don’t think we had that many great scoring chances the last game.”

Due to concerts at Rogers Arena, the home of the Canucks, the teams have had to deal with a two-day gap between Games 1 and 2. Lucic noted that he’s blocked out any chatter in that time and is focused on giving the media something positive to talk about after Saturday’s Game 2.

“Obviously we can’t control what you guys say,” Lucic said. “That’s why we try not to watch or read too much of what you guys say. For us, it’s definitely a big opportunity going into Game 2. We know we have to play better. We need to play better. We need to play the way we did prior coming into this series to give ourselves a chance to win.

“They finished first in the league, in the standings, for a reason,” he said of the Canucks. “They beat the three teams before us to get here for a reason.  They’re a really good team. They beat us in Game 1 because they played better than us.”

Whether or not the media has actually been hard on the B’s, it looks like the two days off have the Bruins itching to get back on the ice in Game 2 and show that they can hang with the Canucks. For 49 minutes and just over 17 seconds, they did on Wednesday.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, David Krejci, Milan Lucic, Ryan Kesler

All present for Bruins practice in Vancouver

06.03.11 at 4:49 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — The Bruins took the ice Friday at the University of British Columbia after not holding a regular practice on Thursday. All players were accounted for, with the exception of third goaltender Anton Khudobin. The lines looked the same as they have in previous practices, with Rich Peverley the fourth man in a gold, second-line sweater.

Milan LucicDavid KrejciNathan Horton
Brad MarchandPatrice BergeronMark Recchi – Rich Peverley
Michael RyderChris KellyTyler Seguin
Daniel PailleGregory CampbellShawn Thornton

For now, it doesn’t look like there will be any lineup changes for Game 2, so expect Peverley to play on the fourth line and float in and out of the second line with Thornton the healthy scratch.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Stanley Cup Finals,

Manny Malhotra on the ice again, still day-to-day

06.03.11 at 4:08 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — Canucks center Manny Malhotra skated Friday at the University of British Columbia after missing recent skates in his attempt to return from an eye injury suffered in March. Both he and coach Alain Vigneault were tight-lipped about where Malhotra stands on a possible return to Vancouver’s lineup during the Stanley Cup finals.

“As I said on Saturday, it’s a day-to-day situation,” Malhotra said Friday. “From one day to the next, things have changed. I didn’t feel proper to go on the ice, so I took a couple days off.”

Vigneault would only offer that “Manny is day-to-day.” Malhotra had 11 goals and 19 assists for 30 points in the regular season.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Alain Vigneault, Manny Malhotra, Stanley Cup Finals

Mike Emrick on The Big Show: ‘I thought there was adequate evidence’ to suspend Alex Burrows

06.03.11 at 3:23 pm ET
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Announcer Mike “Doc” Emrick, who is calling the Stanley Cup finals for NBC and Versus, joined The Big Show Friday afternoon to offer his insight into the Bruins-Canucks series while watching injured Canucks forward Manny Malhotra practice with his team in Vancouver. To hear the interview, go the The Big Show audio on demand page.

Discussing the Bruins’ struggling power play, Emrick said: “I’m not sure that there’s a solution to this problem, or the Bruins would have had it by now. So, maybe they’re just going to have to win the way they know how to win, which I thought was the way they played in Game 1.”

Added Emrick: “This is kind of like a team in the NFL winning key games with a negative rushing yardage. You just don’t see it. But then again, this has been an exceptional team that has played really well, done a lot of things just like this. There’s nothing that says if you can win a seventh game in overtime against Montreal and not score a power-play goal in any of the seven games ‘€” including overtime, when you had a power play ‘€” then maybe you’re a team of destiny. We’ll know a little more after the second game.”

Touching on the controversy involving Alex Burrows‘ alleged bite of Patrice Bergeron‘s finger, Emrick questioned the league’s decision not to suspend Burrows.

“I was surprised, because I thought there was ‘€” at least to the layman ‘€” I thought there was adequate evidence,” he said. “And I think the thing that meant more to me than actually watching the video ‘€¦ was to talk to players who were not affiliated with either Boston or Vancouver and who were retired, who know the players’ mentality. And this may seem naive, but I approached it in this way: Does he know what he’s about to do, and does he know what he’s doing when he does it? And the clear answer was yes, he does. So then, if you add that together with the video evidence, you have to say that’s suspendable.”

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Read More: Alex Burrows, Manny Malhotra, Mike Emrick, Patrice Bergeron

Brad Marchand on M&M: ‘There were a few cheap shots out there’

06.03.11 at 2:25 pm ET
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Bruins winger Brad Marchand joined the Mut & Merloni show Friday afternoon from Vancouver, as he and his teammates prepare for Game 2 of the Stanley Cup finals Saturday night. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Marchand said the Bruins are working on fixing the mistakes they made in Wednesday’s 1-0 loss in Game 1.

“We just have to clean it up a little,” he said. “We were a little sloppy in areas. We still didn’t put our best game forward, so we just have to clean up a few areas around the blue line and in our own zone.”

The Canucks are known for their skill, but they also showed a propensity for stirring up trouble in the opening game.

“There were a few cheap shots out there,” Marchand said. “I got a little rattled about that when I got speared when I was going to the bench, and I ended up taking a penalty because of it. But we do, we hate this team, they hate us. There were a lot of guys running around out there, so I think it’s only going to get worse as the series goes on. There’s no love between us right now.”

Asked how the B’s can stay away from retaliating and receiving penalties, Marchand said: “It’s tough. They’ve got a few guys over there that like to play that style, try to suck guys in. Me being an emotional guy, I’m going to be one of the guys they go after. So, I have to make sure that I just kind of skate away from it, anytime someone’s talking to me, just kind of turn my head and skate away. It’s tough, though. You want to go back, but that’s exactly what they want. We just have to skate away from everything right now and play between the whistles. If we do that, maybe we’ll frustrate them. I think that’s the biggest thing we can do.”

Canucks forward Alex Burrows appeared to bite Bruins center Patrice Bergeron‘s finger Wednesday but escaped punishment from the league.

Said Marchand: “It’s a tough situation there. I think if we weren’t in the finals, maybe it might be a different situation. But it’s tough to give a guy a suspension in the finals. There’s so much riding on the line right now. That’s a tough situation. But I don’t think you much greasier than that.”

One of Vancouver’s Green Men, an individual who goes by the name “Force,” joined The Big Show Friday and said that he was on the receiving end of a water bottle spray from Marchand while taunting the player from just outside the penalty box.

Said Marchand: “I think those guys in those green masks, they’re too ugly to show their faces in public, so they’re just trying to cover up their faces while they go to the game. ‘€¦ They’re just trying to get a taste of the life. They paid a couple of grand to watch us play, so they can enjoy it.”

Read More: Alex Burrows, Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron,

Mark Messier on D&C: Game 1 loss ‘might be a confidence-builder for Boston’

06.03.11 at 7:48 am ET
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Hall of Fame center Mark Messier joined the Dennis & Callahan show Friday morning to talk about the Stanley Cup finals, which continue Saturday night in Vancouver. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

Messier said the Bruins can build on their performance despite losing, 1-0, in Wednesday’s Game 1.

“It might be a confidence-builder for Boston,” he said, adding, “Any time you can hold Vancouver to one goal, I think that you have to be happy. They’re not happy that they didn’t win the game; they had their opportunities as well. But overall, I don’t think either team was leaving that game deflated with the loss. Obviously, Vancouver’s more than happy that they won it. I think Boston can take some solace that they played an excellent game. With some bounces the other way there, they could have come out on top in Game 1.”

The Bruins were unable to solve Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo Wednesday, but Messier said the B’s shouldn’t be looking to try anything new Saturday.

“It would be my message to don’t change your game plan, do what we’ve always done, and let the goalie make a mistake,” he said.

Touching on the NHL’s decision not to suspend Canucks forward Alex Burrows for his apparent bite on Patrice Bergeron‘s finger, Messier indicated that he supported the league’s ruling. “I think the NHL made the right decision in that regard,” he said. “I think that Boston’s probably a little disappointed, because they would like to see Burrows out of the lineup. But in the end, nobody’s really hurt, nobody’s going to miss any games. Tough decision, but I think the right decision was made.”

Read More: Alex Burrows, Mark Messier, Patrice Bergeron, Roberto Luongo

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