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Michael Ryder: We will do ‘everything’ to win it for Nathan Horton

06.14.11 at 1:24 am ET
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The singular turning point of the series has also turned into a rally cry for the Bruins, as Michael Ryder acknowledged after scoring a goal in Boston’s 5-2 win over Vancouver in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals Monday night at TD Garden.

With the crowd already in a frenzy following two quick goals to start the game, the video board at the Garden showed Nathan Horton in the zamboni area waving a Bruins black and gold hanky. Horton was shown live for the first time since being knocked to the ice with a severe concussion exactly one week ago on hit by Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome in Game 3. He has been ruled out of the playoffs.

“Horty’s a big part of this team and he’s one of the reasons we’re where we are,” Ryder said. “He’s a great guy and it’s good to see him a lot better and we know he’s excited and he wants us to win. We have to make sure we do everything we can to pull it off for him.”

“We didn’€™t know that they were going to be doing that and showing him up there,” added Bruins forward Brad Marchand. “You know for him to come in and give us that boost of energy is unbelievable. And obviously the crowd loves it and loves him and are supporting him every minute of the day. It was great to see him out there. He gave us a big energy boost.

Two and a half minutes later, Andrew Ference fired a slap shot past Roberto Luongo on the power play for Boston’s third goal and pandemonium ensued with the Bruins up, 3-0, and Luongo chased to the bench.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Aaron Rome, Andrew Ference, Boston Bruins

Roberto Luongo can’t explain poor performances in Boston, ready to move on

06.14.11 at 12:47 am ET
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Roberto Luongo never saw it coming. No, that’s not a reference to the Bruins’ third goal Monday night, an Andrew Ference shot from the point that found its way through a Mark Recchi screen. Luongo never envisioned himself having another bad game in Boston, his third of the series.

“Honestly, I had a good feeling all day,” Luongo said after Game 6, a game in which he lasted just 8:35 before being pulled. “There were no extra nerves or anything like that. I was excited to play. I mean, we had a chance to win the Cup.”

And yet there he was, heading to the bench after allowing three goals on eight shots. Although Luongo was blinded on the Bruins’ third goal, the first two were definitely stoppable. Brad Marchand scored on the Bruins’ first shot of the game with a wrister from the right circle that found the top right corner. No doubt it was a great shot by Marchand, but Luongo said he could’ve had it.

“I mean, I was there,” Luongo said. “It was a good shot, but at the same time, I got to make that save. He put it where he wanted, but I got to make a save there.”

Thirty-five seconds later, Milan Lucic managed to sneak a shot through Luongo’s five-hole that ended up trickling over the line.

Luongo said he didn’t have any explanation for why he has struggled so much in Boston during this series — he’s given up 15 goals in three games here and has been pulled twice — and that this wasn’t the time to start trying to explain it.

“I’ve had success on the road all year,” Luongo said. “I know that before the series even started, I enjoyed playing in this building. So I’m not going to make any excuses. It just didn’t happen for me obviously, in all three games.

“I’m just going to move on right now,” Luongo continued. “We have one game at home to win a Stanley Cup. … You can’t hang your head now and feel sorry for yourself. That would be the worst thing I could do.”

Vancouver coach Alain Vigneault said after the game that Luongo will be back in net to start Game 7, and he said he fully expects Luongo to bounce back, just like he did in Game 5 when he picked up a shutout.

“I don’t have to say anything to him,” Vigneault said. “He’s a professional. His preparation is beyond reproach, and he’s going to be ready for Game 7.”

Luongo said he isn’t worrying about how he’ll perform in Game 7, either.

“I mean, I got to believe in myself, right? That’s a big component of bouncing back and playing a good game,” Luongo said. “We’re going to put what happened tonight behind us as soon as possible and get ready for what is going to be a dream as far as playing in Game 7 in a Stanley Cup Final.”

The rest of the Canucks players deflected criticism away from Luongo and turned their attention to Wednesday night.

“He’s done it before and he’s going to do it again,” Daniel Sedin of Luongo bouncing back from bad games. “We’re not blaming individual guys when we lose. We lose as a team and we win as a team. We’re excited going into Game 7. It’s going to be awesome.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Roberto Luongo,

Not tired yet: B’s chase Roberto Luongo, force Game 7

06.13.11 at 11:07 pm ET
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By DJ Bean and Scott McLaughlin

The Bruins weren’t ready to see their season end or willing to watch the Canucks raise the Stanley Cup on their ice Monday and it showed, as they chased Roberto Luongo at the Garden again in a 5-2 win at TD Garden to force a Game 7 of the finals. The Cup winner will be determined at Rogers Arena in Vancouver Wednesday night.

Brad Marchand opened the scoring at 5:31 with his third goal in the last four games. With nine goals this postseason, he has set the postseason record for a Bruins rookie.

Milan Lucic followed with a goal of his own at 6:06, and an Andrew Ference power-play goal at 8:35 ended Luongo’s night early in favor of Cory Schneider. Luongo has now gotten the hook in two games this series, both of which were at the Garden.

Michael Ryder and David Krejci chipped in goals as well, with Krejci’s coming on the power play in the third period. The Canucks got contributions on the scoreboard from Henrik Sedin (his first point of the finals) and Maxim Lapierre. Tim Thomas has now allowed eight goals over six games this series.

Wednesday night will be the Bruins’ third Game 7 in four rounds this postseason,as they eliminated both the Canadiens and Lightning in seven games. The Canucks beat the Blackhawks in seven games, their only seven-game series this postseason.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– Luongo was bad once again, and it seemed that all it took was Marchand’s goal, an absolute rifle glove-side, so open up the floodgates. The Bruins certainly have a way of getting to the highly-scrutinized Canucks netminder in Boston, as he has now allowed 15 goals in less than two games’ worth of play at TD Garden this series. The problem when it comes to the play of Luongo vs. the Bruins, of course, is that he has not had such issues in Vancouver. He’s allowed just two goals over three games and has posted two shutouts.

– The Bruins talked a lot about getting more traffic in front of the net after being shut out in Game 5, and they certainly did that Monday night. Their third and fourth goals came as the direct result of having bodies in front. Mark Recchi set a perfect screen on Ference’s power-play goal that chased Luongo from the game. A minute later Ryder got in front of Schneider and tipped Tomas Kaberle‘s shot into the top corner. Needless to say, continuing to get traffic to the net will be a key for the Bruins in Game 7.

– A couple of nice statistical nights for the defensemen. Kaberle had a pair of assists on the night, giving him 11 points this postseason — the most among Boston defensemen. Ference led all B’s in ice time.

On a more peculiar note (and this may not necessarily be bad), Dennis Sieidenberg didn’t see the ice from until 1:22 of the third period until 11:32 and was not on the bench for a time. We’ll see whether this was equipment or injury-related.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

– While the Bruins dominated the first period with relative ease, but Vancouver did come to life from there. The Canucks seemed to regain focus with Schneider in net and spent far more time in the Bruins’ zone. Three power plays will do that, but it should be taken as a sign that just because Luongo collapses, doesn’t mean the hole team does. The Canucks outshot the B’s, 11-8, in the second period and opened the third period by finally getting on the board.

Jannik Hansen thought he had made it 4-2 shortly after, though his shot rang off the post and bounced back as though it had gone in and out. Were it not for the Canucks handing the B’s a 1:13 two-man advantage (on which Krejci scored) with 13:49 to play, the Canucks could have really put a serious fight to make it a close one.

– The idea of a brother Sedin scoring on the power play was something people were prepared to get used to entering the series, but the Bruins had done an excellent job of keeping both the Sedins and the Canucks’ power play silent. Henrik got plenty fancy in beating Thomas for his third-period goal. The tally was his third goal of the postseason and his 22nd point, putting him in a tie with Krejci for the postseason lead in the latter category until Krejci scored to jump back ahead.

– For the first time in his NHL career, Patrice Bergeron was called for four penalties in one game, three of them in the second period. First he was whistled for goaltender interference when he steamrolled Schneider while trying to tip home a centering pass. Then he went off for hauling down Ryan Kesler behind the play. And in the final minute of the period, his elbow came up a little too high while throwing a hit on Christian Ehrhoff. In the third, he and Alexandre Burrows earned matching minors for extracurriculars after the Bruins’ fifth goal. The eight penalty minutes were a new career-high for Bergeron, beating his previous high of seven on April 18, 2009, against the Canadiens. That was also a playoff game — Game 2 of what became a four-game sweep.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, David Krejci, Stanley Cup Playoffs, Tim Thomas

Bruins-Canucks Live Blog: Maxim Lapierre cuts B’s lead to 5-2

06.13.11 at 7:28 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia, Joey the Fish and plenty others from TD Garden for Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals. It’s real simple for the Bruins: win or watch the Canucks hoist the Cup on the B’s ice.

Bruins-Canucks Game 6 Live Blog

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Stanley Cup Finals,

Game 6 countdown, 6 p.m.: Inside the numbers

06.13.11 at 6:00 pm ET
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With Game 6 fast approaching here are a few notable statistics regarding the series and Stanley Cup finals history that could play a role in Monday night’s game:

– The team that has scored first has won each of the first five games of the series.

– The last time the home team won every game of the Stanley Cup finals was in 2003 when the Devils beat the Ducks in seven games.

– The Bruins are 7-0 in the playoffs when Brad Marchand scores.

– Since 1989, six Stanley Cup finals series have been won in six games. All of the clinching games have been won on the road.

– The last four times a team won the Stanley Cup in Game 6, all games were decided by one goal, with three games going into overtime.

– Only two teams since 1939 have won Games 6 and 7, with Game 7 being on the road in the Stanley Cup finals. They are the Canadians in 1971 and the Penguins in 2009.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand,

Game 6 countdown, 5 p.m.: How will Vancouver watch?

06.13.11 at 5:01 pm ET
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Vancouver will once again see its people flock to the streets tonight to view Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals. The city of Vancouver is closing many streets in anticipation of all the people that will take to the streets to watch the game outdoors.

Friday night’s Game 5 drew more than 100,000 people to downtown Vancouver to watch the game on three large televisions at three outdoor viewing locations. Two dozen people were arrested, mostly for breach of peace and public intoxication.

‘€œOur fan zones have been a big hit downtown throughout the playoffs, and we want to keep the positive celebrations going,” Mayor Gregor Robertson wrote in a statement.

There have also been other outdoor viewing locations outside of the city of Vancouver, which have drawn thousands of people. It was a rainy day Monday in Vancouver, which could effect the number of people who attend the outdoor viewing parties Monday night.

Fans can also watch the game at Rogers Arena, the home of the Canucks, for $10, with net proceeds going to charity.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs,

Game 6 countdown, 4 p.m.: What are the hockey experts saying?

06.13.11 at 4:01 pm ET
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With Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals getting closer and closer here is a look at what a few of the hockey experts are saying:

TSN’s Bob McKenzie writes that is has been a ‘bizarre’ Stanley Cup finals. McKenzie has been surprised with just how unruly things have gotten and also writes how he spoke to a referee and he too was surprised at how on edge the players have been. He also writes about how special teams have played a key role in the series and the challenge the Canucks face playing in Boston.

Jeff Klein, of the New York Times, examines just how close the Canucks are to claiming their first Stanley Cup in 41 years of existence. He writes the celebration would rival the celebration that followed the 2010 Winter Olympics gold-medal game held in Vancouver.

Helene Elliott of the LA Times writes how even though the Bruins have dominated the majority of the statistical categories throughout the series it is the Canucks who are one win away from winning the Stanley Cup.

Paul Hunter of Toronto’s The Star has five questions for before tonight’s game, including: Do the Bruins have another Nathan Horton?

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs,

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