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Video: Coyotes in Prague

10.10.10 at 8:52 am ET
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PRAGUE — As any writer on this trip will tell you, stability regard internet connections has not been one of the more amazing parts of this European trip. As a result, this video is getting to you a day late, but here’s proof that the Coyotes are well-represented here in Prague. There was a massive pack of fans who made the trek from Phoenix outside of O2 Arena prior to the team’s 5-2 season-opening victory over the Bruins. Disclaimer: don’t watch this video if you don’t like howling.

Read More: European Trip,

Thomas starting, lines shuffled for Bruins

10.10.10 at 8:40 am ET
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PRAGUE — A night after the Bruins lost their season-opening game in Prague to the Coyotes, 5-2, Claude Julien said that Tim Thomas would be starting in goal for Boston on Sunday. Tuukka Rask allowed four goals to Phoenix in Saturday’s losing effort, though one came from a flukey bounce off the boards and another came on a breakaway caused by a Daniel Paille turnover. Julien indicated that the team’s plan was to start Thomas in the second game anyway barring an overwhelming effort from Rask.

Additionally, Mark Recchi stated prior to the game that he would be playing on the third line with second overall pick Tyler Seguin and Michael Ryder. Daniel Paille and Adam McQuaid are the healthy scratches.

Recchi had played on Patrice Bergeron’s line, which at one point included Seguin, throughout camp and the preseason. Rookie Jordan Caron, another former member of the second line in preseason, will return to skating with Bergeron after being scratched in the opener. Blake Wheeler will remain the second line’s other wing.

The defensive pairings remain unknown entering the game, though it’s worth noting that they were changed during Saturday’s game, with the Dennis Seidenberg-Matt Hunwick pairing dooming the team early on and eventually being separated.

Read More: European Trip, Mark Recchi, Tim Thomas,

Team loses, but Chara deal means Bruins win big

10.09.10 at 6:16 pm ET
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PRAGUE — It was hard to imagine Saturday being too bad a day for the Bruins when word came down that the team had inked captain Zdeno Chara to a seven-year contract extension that will begin following this season, the last of his current deal.

Still, that 5-2 loss sure did give the signing a run for it’s money, didn’t it? The game aside (read about it here), Saturday marked the second of two consecutive huge days for the Bruins’ future. In re-signing both Chara (seven years, $45.5 million) and center Patrice Bergeron (three years, $15 million), the team made sure two players who wear letters other than the spoked “B” on the front of their sweaters (Bergeron himself is an alternate captain at 25 years of age) would be in the fold long term.

What does it mean financially? Put it this way: This season, with the Chara carrying a $7.5 million cap hit and Bergeron with a cap hit of $4.75 million, the Bruins are paying $12.25 million combined for the two of them. When the new deals kick in for the two players, Chara will have a $6.917 cap hit for the first six years (he makes $4 million — less than the average annual value of the rest of the deal — in salary in the last year, which since he will be over 40 is not allowed to be factored into the cap calculation), with Bergeron taking up $5 million in cap space. Combined, that’s a grand total of $11.917 million for both of the players, a savings of about $333,000 for Bergeron and Chara. Imagine the cap going up (even if it’s slightly) in the future, and the Bruins seem to have had themselves a very productive couple of days.

So how did it all come together for the players? Chara’s agent, Matt Keator, told WEEI.com on Saturday that “it was not an easy negotiation,” and that it had “lots of moving parts.” Even so, much like Bergeron said a day before, Chara said — as, to his credit, he did in the week leading up to the signing — that he believed the end result would be him staying in Boston. General manager Peter Chiarelli felt the same way, saying he was “pretty confident” before departing for Europe last week that the players would sign on the trip.

“From our perspective, these are two very, very important pieces of our team, very important individuals on and off the ice. There’s uncertainty as you see some precessions as far as trying to retain these types of players,” Chiarelli said. “As they get closer to the free agent market, you never know what’s going to happen. It’s also an extreme show of good faith when both sides can get it done now, meaning both sides wanted to get a deal done. We want Z and Bergy to be a part of the Bruins for a while, and they wanted to remain with the Bruins. It’s a typical thing. When two sides want something to happen, it usually happens.”

Any longterm deal with Chara, 33, figured to be a tough one for both sides to hammer out given that any deal that goes past a player’s 40th birthday can be complicated as a result of the new cap calculation that came about following the Ilya Kovalchuk saga that grabbed headlines in the offseason. Kovalchuk’s 17-year, $102 million deal with the Devils was nixed by the league because its later years paid out little money in an attempt to lower the cap hit. Now, as a result, the above calculation applies to longterm contracts that go into a player’s 40′s.

“Obviously, Kovalchuk’s situation was a little extreme, and that maybe put the negotiations on hold for a little bit,” Chara said of the hitches that came up in negotiations. “I just knew that we would get this done and I would be a Bruin.”

That’s two top players in two days to accept deals to stay in Boston prior to hitting free agency. It could be a coincidence, but it’s more likely that the Bruins and Chiarelli are seeing a trend develop.

Read More: European Trip, Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara,

Bruins lose opener, 5-2

10.09.10 at 2:38 pm ET
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PRAGUE — The Bruins are, quite clearly, one of the NHL’s elite teams on paper. They did everything they could for the first two periods of Saturday’s season-opener to suggest otherwise, and the glimpses of promise they did show in the third period proved to be too little, too late. The team showed all sorts of offensive and defensive weaknesses as they dropped the opener in Prague, 5-2, to the Coyotes.

Though he did allow four goals in the game, Tuukka Rask didn’t exactly struggle, as one of Phoenix’ goals came on the flukiest of plays and another came on a breakaway caused by a Daniel Paille gaffe.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

- Matt Hunwick. To those on twitter during the game, the poor guy was the subject of about 80 percent of the tweets from either Bruins or fans, and for good reason. Beginning the game paired with Dennis Seidenberg, Hunwick was on the ice for all of the Coyotes’ first three tallies of the game, giving him a headstart on a terrible plus/minus.

Claude Julien tried to stop the bleeding by breaking up the Seidenberg/Hunwick pairing by switching out Hunwick for Mark Stuart. Even so, Seidenberg finished the game with a minus-two.

- General sloppy play was the norm from the Bruins in all three areas on Saturday. Players up and down the roster, from Hunwick, to Blake Wheeler, to Paille, to newly re-signed captain Zdeno Chara, killed chances at offensive opportunities by either squandering the puck or holding onto it too long.

- The power play was unproductive, but when a team gets shut out it’s to be expected that they didn’t produce on the man advantage. At any rate, the team went 0-3 on the power play through the first two periods (they’d later get Nathan Horton’s second goal of the game on a man advantage in the third) and gave up a couple of real scoring opportunities to the shorthanded Coyotes.

The team, as is well documented, was the worst in the league when it came to burying the biscuit (2.39 goals per game), and their power play wasn’t much better. The Bruins finished the season with a 16.6 power play percentage, good for 23rd in the NHL. The additions of Seguin and Horton should improve both categories, but there wasn’t much from the team on the night to suggest it.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- These are going to be a bit redundant because Nathan Horton was so clearly the Bruins’ most valuable player for the Bruins on Saturday. Here’s the separate one dedicated just to Horton: He can’t be beat from in front of the net. He missed early on in the game by firing one wide at the gloveside of Ilya Bryzgalov, but beat the Phoenix goaltender with his lethal wrist shot on the next two chances. He tried to downplay the possibility of him being a 40-goal-scorer this year, but he’s the complete package.

- The first line showed what it’s made of. In addition to Milan Lucic’s physicality and David Krejci’s craftiness (he embarrassed Adrian Aucoin early in the third period at the blueline with a move that dropped the defenseman to the ice based on pure confusion), but Nathan Horton was allowed to do what he does best: fire off a wrister from the hashmark. Lucic hit him from behind the net to set up the team’s only goal of the game at 3:33 of the game.

- Gregory Campbell is going to be a difficult player for Bruins fans not to like. Following Horton’s first goal, he gave the Bruins a little more momentum in the third period by dropping the gloves with Coyotes center Vernon Fiddler. He took a bad slashing penalty with less than 10 minutes to go and his team trailing by two, but aside from that he came as advertised — a solid bottom-six forward who despite not having major strengths, has no major weaknesses.

Read More: European Trip, Nathan Horton, Tuukka Rask,

Bruins down trailing 4-0 after two

10.09.10 at 1:45 pm ET
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PRAGUE –The Bruins have let sloppy play define the first two periods of their 2010-11 season, and as a result find themselves trailing the Coyotes, 4-0 heading into the third period. For a team that didn’t have to play from behind much a large chunk of the time in the preseason, it will be interesting to see how they respond.

The Coyotes potted their second goal of the game at 1:59 of the period when Tuukka Rask, a down and a bit deep in his net, was beaten top shelf on a rebound by Phoenix winger Taylor Pyatt. Daniel Paille later gave away a puck in the offensive zone to a flying Scottie Upshall, who walked in on Rask and beat him low stickside. Then, with 16.1 seconds remaining in the period, Eric Belanger took a Ray Whitney pass in across the net and converted it into the Coyotes’ fourth goal.

Tyler Seguin logged the most first-period ice time for the Bruins, but after two periods is a minus-two. The only player with a worse rating would be Matt Hunwick, who was moved off his pairing halfway through the period. Dennis Seidenberg is now skating with Mark Stuart.

Bruins down 1-0 after one

10.09.10 at 12:50 pm ET
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PRAGUE — Through 20 minutes of regular season play, one conclusion can be drawn: The Bruins take the “power” out of “power play.” The team went 0-for-3 with Phoenix skaters in the sin bin as they enter the locker room trailing, 1-0.

Radim Vrbata got the scoring started for the Coyotes, taking a baseball swing at a floating puck to the side of the net, courtesy of an errant Adrian Aucoin slapshot from the point. The Bruins shouldn’t lose sleep over the quirky goal, though they twice allowed shorthanded breakaways to the Coyotes, the second of which was the fault of a Zdeno Chara turnover.

The Bruins had scoring opportunities but struggled to hit the net when it counted. Michael Ryder let one fly gloveside and wide of the net early in the period from the circle, while Nathan Horton for seemingly the first time in a Bruins uniform failed to convert from the hashmarks. His wristshot, twice the ammunition used to notch goals in the preseason, also sailed wide to the left of Phoenix goaltender Ilya Bryzgalov.

The Bruins outshot the Coyotes in the period, 15-12.

Chara gets extension

10.09.10 at 12:02 pm ET
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PRAGUE — The Bruins and captain Zdeno Chara have agreed to a seven-year contract extension hours before the season-opener against the Coyotes at O2 Arena in Prague. The agreement was first reported by the Boston Globe.

Speaking with WEEI.com and other outlets last week, Chara did not keep his desire to stay in Boston a secret while also stating in Belfast that though he would like to play until his mid-40′s, he planned on it taking more than one deal to finish his career. Dupont writes that Chara, 33, will see his new deal carry a cap hit in the mid-to-upper $6 million range. His current deal carries a team-high $7.5 million hit.

Chara is entering the final year of a five-year, $37.5 million deal signed in 2006 after beginning his career with the Islanders and Senators. He has served as captain for his entire Bruins career. In 847 career games in the NHL, the Slovakian defenseman has scored 111 goals and picked up 252 assists 363 points.

Read More: European Trip, Zdeno Chara,
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