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Overtime for rookie game

09.16.10 at 9:23 pm ET
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BOSTON — The Bruins and Islanders were still knotted up at one goal apiece following three periods of play, so it will be a five-minute sudden death period of four-on-four, followed by a shootout if necessary. The Islanders have outshot the Bruins thus far, 33-29.

Read More: Training camp, Tyler Seguin,

Colborne’s nose not broken

09.16.10 at 8:45 pm ET
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BOSTON — While his teammates took to the ice against the Islanders on Thursday night, Joe Colborne took a view minutes to talk with media members on hand at the Bruins’ second rookie game, a contest he would have played in were it not for him getting cut up pretty badly in Wednesday’s game.

Colborne sported stitches both in and on his nose and the area around his mouth looked pretty swollen as he spoke, but he indicated that he did not have a broken nose, which what was initially assumed by the Bruins following the first rookie game. He had a CT scan performed and underwent a test to gauge whether he may have suffered a concussion, but said that nothing worrisome came from any of the tests.

It was a little over halfway through the third period when Colborne caught either a Justin DiBenedetto elbow or a Bruins stick to the nose in a well-crowded play, leaving a pool of blood by the Islanders’ blue line and an additional winding trail as he woozily skated off the ice.

Though he admitted to feeling a bit out of it following the play, the prognosis certainly wasn’t anywhere near as bad as it could have been, especially considering how heavily Colborne was bleeding following the play. Fans held their breath as Colborne eventually left the ice, the trickling blood unrelenting, and when he watched it himself, he could see why.

“I just saw the hit for the first time,” Colborne said. “After seeing that and how I got up, having no damage or anything, I feel pretty fortunate.”

“It’s hockey, it’s a rough game, and it will happen,” he added. “I wish wish I was out there right now, but hopefully I’ll meet up with that guy sooner or later.”

Colborne said that both of his parents were in attendance for the game. He didn’t want his mother to worry too much after seeing that play, and given that Colborne recently had a friend lose his legs in a car accident, the injury was put in perspective for the entire family.

“She wasn’t too happy, obviously, but it’s not the first time I’ve been cut,” Colborne said. “Worse things could have happened, I told her. It could have been a knee or a shoulder, or something like that.”

Though the stitches and swelling won’t win him a beauty contest, Colborne and the Bruins are right to appreciate that no damage was done either to cartilage or neurologically. The Bruins’ first-round choice in the 2008 draft, Colborne said he will wear a cage when he does return to the ice, which he figures will be Saturday.

With Colborne sitting out for the 2-1 overtime victory, he missed an opportunity to play under Providence coach Rob Murray for an eighth time. In addition to Wednesday’s contest, Colborne played six games for the AHL club. If he has anything to say about it, he will keep that number at seven by earning a big league spot. Either way, all parties involved are lucky that Colborne will be healthy enough to try to prove himself from the getgo.

Read More: Joe Colborne, Training camp,

Spooner avoids the post the second time around

09.16.10 at 8:32 pm ET
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BOSTON — After hitting the post on a three-on-one earlier in the period, Ryan Spooner made good on a knuckling Max Sauve rebound to make it a tie game as the Bruins and Islanders prepare for the third period. Spooner batted the floating rebound down and past Islanders goaltender Kevin Poulin.

As expected, the game did get a little more physical in the second period, with Islanders forward Travis Hamonic getting tossed for getting his second fighting major of the series. He took a few heavy blows from Lane MacDermid.

The Bruins outshot the Islanders, 10-8, in the period, but still have 14 to New York’s 20.

Read More: Ryan Spooner, Training camp, Tyler Seguin,

Bruins rookies down a goal after first

09.16.10 at 7:53 pm ET
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BOSTON — Islanders forward Tony Romano sniped the only goal of the game thus far past Michael Hutchinson from the dot and the Bruins finished the first period down 1-0 Thursday.

Yury Alexandrov took a hooking penalty with 47.8 seconds remaining in the first period, so the Bruins will take the ice in the second down a man for the second consecutive night. The rest of the first 20 minutes was a lot less chippy than Wednesday’s game, though the rough stuff didn’t really kick in until the second period in the first rookie game. Ryan Donald was unsurprisingly aggressive and appeared to get scrappy with Rhett Rakhshani, but had the two squared off, Donald would have been given a game misconduct per the two-fighting-major rule of the rookie games.

All was relatively quiet on the Seguin watch, though he did pull a nifty move in kicking a puck from behind him onto his forehand. It would have been an interesting play anywhere on the ice, but he did it on the blue line and managed to stay onsides. The ensuing shot went wide of Kevin Poulin, but fans got a kick out of it nonetheless. The Islanders outshot the Bruins in the period, 12-4.

Read More: Training camp, Tyler Seguin,

Second line sees shakeup with Colborne out

09.16.10 at 6:44 pm ET
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BOSTON — Michael Hutchinson‘s presence between the pipes Thursday night won’t be the only difference in the Bruins’ lineup when their rookies take on the Islanders youngsters in their second and final rookie game. Tyler Seguin‘s line with Jared Knight and Jamie Arniel remains in tact, but with Joe Colborne out with a possible broken nose, the second line is now centered by Craig Cunningham with Lane MacDermid and Jordan Caron once again on the wings. The third line consists of Ryan Spooner between Max Sauve and Tyler Randell, with the final line being comprised of Joe Plekaitis in the middle of Walker Wintoneak and Yannick Riendeau.

The defensive pairings were the same in warmups as last night. Ryan Donald is out there with Yury Alexandrov, Steve Kampfer is paired with Matt Delahey, and Ryan Button will skate with Matt Bartkowski.

A night after Mikko Koskinen got the start in net for the Islanders, 2008 fifth-round pick Kevin Poulin is manning the pipes.

Read More: Joe Colborne, Training camp, Tyler Seguin,

Having lost in poker, Krejci puts extra work toward the wrist

09.16.10 at 12:57 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — The six Bruins skaters that showed up to the final captain’s practice only had one target to shoot on, but David Krejci didn’t wait for Nolan Schaefer or the rest of his teammates to take the ice. Krejci, still recovering from surgery on his right wrist, made the ice his driving range early on Thursday, taking a crate of pucks and firing an estimated 100 shots against the wall.

The center admitted to having some soreness following the session, but noted that the pain came with the increased workload.

“My average is five shots at most a game,” Krejci said. “I took a hundred today.”

He took mostly wrist shots, and by the time he’d moved onto slap shots, his teammates had joined him on the ice and they broke into a very relaxed session of light offensive drills.

Asked what he made of the poor turnout, Krejci pointed to Friday’s early wakeup call for fitness testing as a reason why players would be wise to rest up. The Bruins have been keeping busy between the voluntary practice sessions, Monday’s golf tournament, and Marco Sturm’s poker tournament Wednesday night.

“I lost badly,” Krejci said of the poker tournament. With it being set up as having one Bruin per table, Krejci was fortunate that none of his teammates could knock him out. Krejci said ultimately he wasn’t concerned with winning, but that the poker players that showed up for the $250 buy-in definitely varied in skill level.  The event, which featured over a dozen Bruins including Zdeno Chara, Patrice Bergeron, and Tuukka Rask, benefitted the Franciscan Hospital for Children.

Read More: David Krejci, Training camp,

Schaefer doesn’t forget the nightmares from Brian Gionta

09.16.10 at 12:15 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — With Thursday’s news that former Boston College superstar Brian Gionta would be named captain of the Montreal Canadiens, it seemed as good a time as ever to reminisce on his fantastic college career. Except for Nolan Schaefer.

“I remember I had a few nightmares with him,” Schaefer, a goaltender at Providence college in Gionta’s final two Hockey East years, said with a grin Thursday following captain’s practice.

Gionta racked up 123 goals over his four-year career at Boston College, much to the chagrin of his Hockey East foes. Told Thursday that Gionta, now 31, would become the Habs’ captain, Schaefer didn’t seem surprised by the success Gionta’s been able to have, especially given his college dominance.

“He seemed to be developed already at the college level. He was already playing on a pro level,” Schaefer said. “He was way above most guys you’d play against skill-wise, not to mention he had a pretty decent team at BC. We were sort of outmatched. It was a tough time. ‘€¦ Every time you played him, you had to make sure you knew where he was on the ice.”

Schaefer pointed to the 2000-2001 season, one in which Gionta was named Hockey East Player of the Year and led the Eagles past the Friars in the Hockey East championship, as an example of the undersized forward’s prowess at the college level. In that eason, Schaefer posted a 2.47 goals against average in 25 games, but much of the attention of remained on Gionta, who tallied 33 goals.

A third-round pick by the Devils, Gionta, at 5-foot-7, has been one of the shortest players in the NHL since entering the league in the 2001-2002 season. That knock, which came up often in his college days when projecting his NHL chances, never stopped Gionta. Even before the post-lockout NHL came about, Gionta could hang his hat on starting in the Stanley Cup finals in 2002-03 and having a 21 goal 2003-04 season. Since the lockout and the “new NHL” giving more of an advantage to speed guys, Gionta has average 28.6 goals a year despite playing 62 and 61 games in 2006-07 and last season, respectively. He notched a career-high 48 in 2005-06.

“Before, I could see where [size] could be a problem with the old rules. There was no way you could break past those bigger guys,” Schaefer said. “Now, with the new rules, you can’t put your sticks up, there’s no holding and clutching and stuff, so speed and skill is definitely going to transcend that size [issue].”

Gionta will be just the second American-born captain in the history of the franchise, joining Chris Chelios, who co-captained the team in 1989-90

Read More: Brian Gionta, Nolan Schaefer,
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