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The day after the Cup, 11:45 a.m.: Boston ratings break records

06.16.11 at 11:47 am ET
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According to Austin Karp, Asst. Managing Editor of Sports Business Daily, the Bruins-Canucks Game 7 Wednesday night earned a 5.7 rating overnight, which tied the 2003 Devils-Ducks finale as best Stanley Cup Game 7 overnight on record. It also tied for the second best Stanley Cup overnight in 37 years. It was tied with last year’s Blackhawks-Flyers Game 6.

The ratings were even better in Boston. According to Bruce Allen, Boston Sports Media Watch, the game earned a 43.4 rating locally with a 64 share. It’s the best overnight on record for a hockey game in Boston.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Champions,

The day after the cup, 11:30 a.m.: Boston stays relatively under control following win

06.16.11 at 11:03 am ET
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Compared to the scenes in Vancouver following the Bruins Game 7 victory, Boston remained under control following the game with no major incidents. There were seven arrests following the Bruins victory, mostly for trespassing, disorderly conduct and malicious destruction of property.

Boston police had a plan in place to keep the streets of Boston safe. There were hundreds of police officers, some in riot gear. Some streets were closed to traffic and barricades were set up. All of Causeway street outside the TD Garden was shut down and fans were not allowed to enter.

Bars also took measures to keep fans safe. They were asked to take in or secure outdoor furniture, black out windows to prevent crowds from gathering outside to watch the TVs inside, and not admit any customers after the end of the game’s second period.

“It’s fair to say that the vast majority of fans celebrated responsibly, and officers have done an excellent job of keeping order,” Elaine Driscoll, a spokeswoman for the Boston police, said.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Champions,

The day after the cup, 11 a.m.: Tim Thomas joins list of goalies to win Conn Smythe

06.16.11 at 11:03 am ET
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Since 1990 six goaltenders have won the Conn Smythe Trophy, that is until Tim Thomas won it this year as the most valuable player during the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

Bill Ranford won it in 1990 with the Oilers, Patrick Roy won it in 1993 and in 2001, and he also won it back in 1986. Red Wings goaltender Mike Vernon captured it in 1996. Only one goaltender won the award even though their team lost in the Stanley Cup Finals, Jean-Sébastien Giguère earned it in 2003 when the Ducks of Anaheim lost to the Devils. Cam Ward was the last goalie to win the award with the Hurricanes in 2006.

Seven centers, four defensemen and one winger were the other positions to win the award in that span. Since the award was originated in 1964 there have now been 14 goaltenders have win the award.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Finals, Conn Smythe, Tim Thomas,

The day after the Cup, 9:30 a.m.: What is Vancouver saying?

06.16.11 at 9:31 am ET
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After the Bruins 4-0 victory in Game 7 over the Canucks, the mood among the media and fans in Vancouver/Canada was a great season, but ending in disappointment.

Roy Macgregor of The Globe and Mail writes that it has been 18 years since the Stanley Cup has been won by a Canadian team. Macgregor details other Canadian teams that have been close, but could not win the Cup. He also highlights Zdeno Chara, Tim Thomas and Milian Lucic hoisting the cup. He ends by asking a question that is on many people’s minds regarding Roberto Luongo: “Can he win the big one?”

Cam Cole of the Vancouver Sun takes a look at the Sedin Twins and how the series went for them. He also gets their opinion on the riots after the game. ‘€œIt’€™s terrible,’€ Henrik said. ‘€œThis city and province have a lot to be proud of.” He also writes that the Bruins “showed no respect for the Canucks’€™ gaudy regular season numbers, pounding the Vancouver skill players at will with little fear of retribution.”

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The day after the Cup, 9 a.m.: Who takes the blame in Vancouver?

06.16.11 at 9:00 am ET
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Following the Bruins Game 7 victory over the Canucks, the analysts on TSN were asked who they felt on Vancouver deserved most of the blame for the loss.

‘€œWhen you get to Game 7 of a Stanley Cup championship, you need your big guys to come up large,’€ TSN hockey analyst Ray Ferraro said. ‘€œ[Ryan] Kesler came up with nothing. The Sedins were both minus four, [Roberto] Luongo gave up three goals, and it was curtains.’€

“People are going to point the finger at Luongo – he gives up three goals on 10 shots in this game,” said TSN hockey analyst Bob McKenzie.

“He’s certainly not going to get the benefit of the doubt because of the debacle in Boston in Game 6 where he gave up three goals on eight shots and the game got completely away from him on a night when Vancouver could have clinched the Stanley Cup. Back-to-back [poor] games, it’s going to be difficult for Roberto Luongo to dodge the bullet on that one.”

Ferraro also shared the same feeling on Luongo. “Luongo was not able to get out of his own way and after the Game 6 debacle; you know this was going to be a challenge for him. In this game he wasn’t worse than average, but it wasn’t good enough,” he said.

“I think Vancouver showed up. They had a nice start to the game,” said Ferraro. “But I think the Bruins played a virtually perfect road game, and on the stage of Game 7 I would say it was perfect.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Finals,

Recchi leaves his Mark on Bruins, ends historic career with Cup

06.16.11 at 5:33 am ET
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VANCOUVER — The Bruins knew their season was going to end Wednesday, and hours before Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals, word emerged that regardless of the result, it would be the last game of Mark Recchi‘s historic career.

It’s a storybook ending for a legendary player to end his career with one last championship, and one that is rarely realized. Players stick around a long time trying to get that last taste of victory, and now Recchi has it. He has won the Stanley Cup three times, each one with a different team, and now he’s done. The ultimate winner is leaving the game in fitting fashion.

‘€œIt is amazing,” Recchi said after the Bruins’ 4-0 win over the Canucks. “Not too many people get that chance. I can’€™t thank these guys enough, the players and everything they did for me.’€

What they did for him? Recchi taught the Bruins how to be winners. His skill certainly wasn’t where it was when he was a younger lad, but Recchi’s heart trumped all in the finals, as his line with Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand produced three of the Bruins’ four goals, with Bergeron scoring the other on the penalty kill.

“I talked to Recchi last night and I was feeling nervous and I asked him to give me some advice,” Bergeron recalled after the game. “He told me to relax and go out there and play the game and to do it for him. ‘€¦ I’ve learned so much from him on and off the ice, it’s a great feeling that we’ve accomplished this as a team.”

The mark that Recchi has left on the Bruins is obvious, and while nobody can make a player like Marchand into a saint, the lessons Recchi taught the Bruins’ young winger will never be forgotten.

“The amount he’s pushed me and helped me grow as a player, I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for him,” Marchand said. “Everything that I learned from him on and off the ice, it’s unbelievable. It was such an honor to be a part of this, going through it with him and to have played with a guy that I watched growing up. [He’s] a hall-of-famer, one of the best guys to ever play the game. It’s truly an honor to have played on his team.”

The Bruins may have lost one of the game’s best winners, but they have a room full of those after Wednesday.

With Tim Thomas rising to the occasion, one goal all Bruins needed

06.16.11 at 5:08 am ET
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VANCOUVER — Admit it, Bruins fans. After Patrice Bergeron took Brad Marchand‘s pass in front of the net with just over five minutes left in the first period and sent it past the right leg of Roberto Luongo, you started thinking about the Cup. Who needed three more goals?

In some sick, twisted way, that’s just what Bruins fans — supporters of the very team that had gone 39 years without winning the Stanley Cup — had been conditioned to believe. When Tim Thomas is the man in net, it’s only human to believe that one goal could be enough. Playing in the biggest game of his career, Thomas capped a historic season by shutting out the Canucks on their own ice and helping the Bruins to that elusive Cup.

“I was hoping someone else would score so I wouldn’€™t have to shut them out,” Thomas said with his signature grin when recalling Bergeron’s first goal. “I was happy going into the game, talked about not getting too high. If we do score, you can’t act like you’ve won the Stanley Cup because you will get an emotional high and it will end up showing on the ice.

“I was just trying to stay level. It was just one goal. It was a huge goal, the game-winning goal, but at that time, there was still a lot of game and a lot of work left to do.”

There was a lot of game left, but as the Canucks failed to convert on chance after chance (Alexandre Burrows really bit the bag when Zdeno Chara gift-wrapped a game-tying goal in the second period) and Thomas stoned them everywhere he could, it became clear that the Thomas’ season was destined to end just the way it began: with a reminder that when he’s on, there isn’t a match for him. He proved in these playoffs that he was this season’s best goaltender, and despite some high-scoring games against the Lightning, he never let up.

“No matter if we had slow starts, no matter if we didn’t play our best game, we always had a chance with Timmy, because Timmy is great,” Claude Julien, who gave Thomas the second start of the season in Prague, said after Wednesday’s win. “These finals, seven straight games and there wasn’t a bad game from Timmy, only exceptional ones.”

Thomas did fear that his play may have begun to waver in Game 6. Given that it was a contest in which he only allowed two goals (one of which was in garbage time), even when Thomas didn’t feel like his dominant self, he still got the results of a Vezina and Conn Smythe winner.

“Right off the opening face-off there was a guy that whacked it backhand from the outside blue line right off the opening face-off and I just lost it,” Thomas said of Game 6. “It was up in the air and I went into full panic mode in my mind. Then Vancouver put the pressure on and whizzed the puck around the crease four or five different times, shot just wide. I was on my heels there for a second, and that was the first time that I’d gotten nervous during the finals.

“So, yeah, I was scared. I won’t lie. I had nerves yesterday and today. I faked it as well as I could, and I faked my way all the way to the Stanley Cup.”

Thomas may have faked confidence, but when it comes to a miraculous season in which he led both the regular season and postseason in save percentage and GAA, there was no faking that production.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Mark Recchi, Patrice Bergeron, Stanley Cup Finals
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