Big Bad Blog AT&T
WEEI.com Blog Network

Tyler Seguin’s shot broke Milan Lucic’s toe in practice

06.20.11 at 12:00 am ET
By   |   Comments

Bruins left winger Milan Lucic admitted Sunday at the team’s breakup day that Tyler Seguin broke his right big toe with a slap shot at a practice during the team’s championship run. Lucic, who said he had played the end of the regular season and into the playoffs with a sinus infection, said it was painful for him to play through it, but that he wanted to remain in the lineup.

“Against Tampa, just before Game 2 at practice, Seguin hit me in the toe with a slap shot, so I had a broken toe for the last 13 games, which sucked big time — which really, really sucked,” Lucic said.

“You don’t realize how much you actually push off it until you break it,” he added. “I don’t know if you guys had seen me limp a little bit, but I was limping a little bit. I definitely had to deal with that, especially in that Tampa series. That was kind of tough to deal with.”

Lucic said the injury “heals on its own” and will not require surgery. The 23-year-old did not miss any time in the postseason and totaled five goals and seven assists for 12 points in the playoffs. He led the B’s with 30 goals in the regular season.

Read More: Milan Lucic, Tyler Seguin,

Tomas Kaberle wants to return to Bruins

06.19.11 at 11:59 pm ET
By   |   Comments

Bruins defenseman Tomas Kaberle, who is set to become an unrestricted free agent July 1, said Sunday at TD Garden that his preference is to return to the Stanley Cup champions.

Kaberle was acquired on Feb. 18 from the Maple Leafs in exchange for the Bruins’ first-round pick, center Joe Colborne and a 2012 second-round pick. The defenseman struggled with the B’s through the end of the season and into the playoffs but turned in a fine performance in the Stanley Cup finals vs. Vancouver and led all B’s defensemen in playoff points.

“Obviously we’€™re going to talk the next few days,” Kaberle said. “Everything was hectic the last couple of days. Hopefully we can sit down or we can talk to my agent and it will be nice to be back here.”

Asked for clarification on whether Boston is his first choice, Kaberle responded, “yes.”

Kaberle had a $4 million salary cap hit last season.

Read More: Tomas Kaberle,

Stanley Cup toes the rubber at Fenway with help from the Bruins

06.19.11 at 6:00 pm ET
By   |   Comments


brightcove.createExperiences();

Zdeno Chara, Tim Thomas and the rest of the 2011 Stanley Cup champion Bruins were paraded around the warning track for 10 minutes prior to Sunday’s Red Sox game against the Brewers.

Chara and Thomas were on the lead duck boat of four that were in the processional that began by entering through the center field wall about 15 minutes before first pitch.

Chara was holding up the Stanley Cup for nearly the entire time during the procession around Fenway.

After making one round around Fenway, the players departed in the center field triangle and made their way to the infield with the Stanley Cup, in addition to the Eastern Conference trophy and the Conn Smythe trophy, earned by Thomas as the MVP of the Stanley Cup playoff run.

The pre-game ceremony was capped off by all members of the Bruins throwing simultaneous first pitches to the Red Sox players, who stood in a line from dugout to dugout behind home plate.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Boston Red Sox, duck boats

Andrew Ference happy to share Cup with Boston, surprised by Kevin Bieksa’s comments

06.18.11 at 5:39 pm ET
By   |   Comments

Andrew Ference had waited all 32 years of his life, including a devastating Game 7 loss in the Stanley Cup finals with Calgary, before finally winning the Cup with the Bruins.

The city of Boston has waited 39 years. The fans win.

To be able to bring the Cup to Boston has been special for Ference and his teammates, who feel they can identify with fans now more than ever. It’s what they have in common, Ference feels, that makes the city’s celebration of the Cup even more special.

“I just feel like everybody feels like we do,” Ference said Saturday. “We’ve waited our whole lives to win it, and put in a lot of work and dedication and we finally get to raise the Cup, but all the hockey fans here have put in their hard work, too, supporting the teams and waiting so long. It’s amazing how many people come up and introduce themselves as season ticket-holders for x-number of years. That’s hard work. That’s support and that’s incredible dedication to the sport and to the team. Of course they’re as excited as we are, so it’s amazing.”

Ference, who took the Cup through Boston in a stroller, earlier in the week, said it was total blur when he raised the trophy for the first time.

“It really happened so quick, and even the whole time on the ice is just kind of a blur and busy. You’re in disbelief. It was great on the ice, but it was more fun almost in the locker room after to real savor it. On the ice, you’re really just hoping for a good picture so you can put it on the wall.”

LAY OFF THE JACKET

Ference said Saturday that his team drew no motivation from the lack of respect it received during the Stanley Cup finals, but did not that he was surprised that players such as Kevin Bieksa bad-mouthed them to the media.

Bieksa, of course, made fun of the 1980’s jacket that Ference bought on eBay for $35 — a hideous sight to any eyes — that one player wears after each game to denote the team’s most valuable player. Bieksa called the tradition childish, asking, “Don’t Pee Wee teams have that?”

“It just surprised me that he would say that publicly,” Ference said Saturday. “How does that benefit them? I don’t know. Even if you think it, you can chirp us all you want in your own locker room. Publicly, it’s just more surprising. I didn’t care, it doesn’t hurt our feelings. We love it and what it represents. Yeah, just to say some things publicly were surprising because it does absolutely no good for your own team.”

The Bruins got the last laugh, of course, as the Stanley Cup ended up wearing the jacket as the team celebrated in the visitors room at Rogers Arena Wednesday.

NOT ALL VANCOUVER FANS ARE BAD

Aside from a chorus of boos for commissioner Gary Bettman, the Canucks fans were respectful of the Bruins when they won the Cup, cheering as Zdeno Chara lifted the historic trophy, and getting louder for the likes of Tim Thomas and Vancouver native Milan Lucic. The Green Men, who famously harass opponents, even held a “Congrats Milan” sign. Ference said he and the Bruins appreciated how they were treated by the fans, and that the riots that ensued don’t typify all those who root for the Canucks.

“As much as bad stuff happened from some people there, there’s still some great, great hockey fans that respect the game,” Ference said. “You don’t want to taint everybody from what a few people messed up after the game.”

Read More: Andrew Ference, Kevin Bieksa,

With playing days over, Mark Recchi hopes to find a way to manage

06.18.11 at 4:18 pm ET
By   |   Comments

Mark Recchi has competed in his last NHL game, as he assured the media Saturday morning that he will not come out of retirement after winning his third Stanley Cup.

Recchi did offer a peek into where is mind is as he wraps his playing days, however.

“I’d like to stay in the game,” Recchi said. “We’ll see where that takes me. I’ll take a little time off. I’d like to stay in the game somewhat. I like more the management side. I like the building process, building a team. We’ll see where it takes [me].”

Recchi, who said he likes to “figure out the pieces of the puzzle,” said that Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli has done a fine job of that since coming to Boston in 2006.

“The pieces are all set there again,” Recchi said of the team’s future. “The way Peter set this organization up is incredible. They’ve got the No. 9 pick this year. They just keep stockpiling. It’s set up — the franchise — to be real successful for a long time. He did an incredible job.”

For Recchi to go from the ice to a front office would be nothing out of the ordinary, as many current NHL general managers are former players. While Chiarelli never reached the NHL as a player, president Cam Neely used his role as a means of winning his first Stanley Cup after a Hall-of-Fame playing career with the Canucks and Bruins.

Speaking of the Hall, it’s safe to say that is also in Recchi’s future. The 43-year-old finished his career with 577 goals and 956 assists for 1533 points. His 1652 regular season games place him fourth all time, behind only Gordie Howe (1,767), Mark Messier (1,756) and Ron Francis (1,731). He is 25th all-time with 61 playoff goals.

Read More: Mark Recchi,

Shawn Thornton: The Cup is no ‘rec league trophy’

06.18.11 at 3:40 pm ET
By   |   Comments


brightcove.createExperiences();

Even the life of the party needs some time to chill. Whether your Shawn Thornton or the Stanley Cup.

That’s exactly what Thornton and his buddies did with Lord Stanley on Friday – a day before the biggest “Rolling Rally” in Boston history – as they just hung out in his Boston home and had a few beverages and soaked it all in.

“Just kept looking at it,” Thornton said. “Nothing was forced, it was just relaxing, pretty cool.

“The best part is I had it at my house [Friday] for about an hour, hour and a half, just me and the guy who lives downstairs, my neighbor and a couple of friends, just chillin’ out, having a couple of drinks. Being able to settle down, it was good.”

Thornton – who won the Cup in 2007 with the Ducks – had the Cup out at a couple of establishments as well in Boston. Safe to say, there was a little more attention paid to it in Beantown than Disneyland.

“When we had the Cup out the other day at Tia’s and Stella’s and a couple of other places, compared to Anaheim, we had it on the beach on Newport and there was like 20 people looking at it,” Thornton said. “Pretty much looked at it as a rec league trophy. Nobody knew any different. Having helicopters over Tia’s is probably a little bit different, yes.”

Thornton – who admitted to be “blurry” after the last two days of celebrating – wore Mardi Gras-type beads to Saturday’s rally, joining several other Bruins doing the same on the duck boats.

“They gave them to me,” he said. “I’m not throwing them unless you deserve them. That’s all I’m going to say.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, NHL, Rolling rally

Mark Recchi: ‘Nothing better’ than bringing Cup to Bruins fans

06.18.11 at 3:11 pm ET
By   |   Comments


brightcove.createExperiences();

Before moving on to the next phase of his career, Mark Recchi took a little time Saturday to savor his last Stanley Cup championship as a player.

He won with the Mario Lemieux Penguins in 1991. He won with Rod Brind’Amour and the Hurricanes in 2006. And now he’s hoisted the Cup with the Bruins.

“They’re all special in different ways,” Recchi said before getting on a duck boat and going for the three-mile joyride of his career. “To go out on top is something very special and you never forget. Regardless of what would’ve happened in Game 7, this was going to be one of the best groups I ever played with anyway. To get that chance to win with them is incredible.

“They were different. Obviously, ’91 was a long time ago. It wasn’t a parade, we were down at a point down in Pittsburgh. We had a parade in Carolina, which was really good, but not like today. This is something really special.”

The outpouring affected each and every Bruins player, coach and executive on the duck boats Saturday. For the 43-year-old Recchi, it was an amazing feeling.

“It’s incredible,” he said. “It’s such a great sports town anyway. With the Red Sox, Celtics and Patriots all winning in the last 10 years and for the Bruins to do it now – and it’s been a long time, 39 years – it’s great to be a championship city again. There’s nothing better.”

Recchi also said he felt overjoyed for Brad Marchand, Tyler Seguin and Patrice Bergeron and the younger players on this Bruins team, a team that could have its best years ahead of it.

“[2006] was the same thing,” Recchi said. “I was able to just watch the guys react, how react to things, how they feel under pressure. That’s the great thing about it. Now these guys start the playoffs, and hopefully, they get back into this position again and they’ll be able to enjoy it that much more.”

But all of the joy aside Saturday, he said he’s have absolutely no thoughts of extending his career one more season with the Bruins.

“No, that’s it,” Recchi said definitively, though he noted he would like to stay in the game in some sort of management role.

Has he officially contacted the Bruins about a front office gig?

“Oh no, I haven’t talked to anybody about that,” Mark Recchi. “We’ve been having too much fun.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Mario Lemieux, Mark Recchi
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule

Latest from Bleacher Report

Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines