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Bruins gain important two points in Toronto

04.03.10 at 9:50 pm ET
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Summary — The Bruins continue to look for ways to apply pressure in the playoff race in the Eastern Conference, and they got a much-needed pair of points in Toronto on Saturday with a 2-1 overtime win against the Maple Leafs at Air Canada Centre.

Miroslav Satan scored the game-winner in overtime with 1:35 left when he deflected a Zdeno Chara blast from the point into the net to light the lamp and end the game. Tuukka Rask got the win for the Bruins with 27 saves out dueling Jonas Gustavsson’s 28 stops in the process.

Toronto took the early lead when Colton Orr found a Dion Phaneuf rebound in the slot in front of Rask at 5:10 in the first period. He put it in the back of the net while getting pushed to the ice to give the Leafs the early 1-0 lead.

Boston came back after getting outshot 14-5 in the first period to tie the game in the second. David Krejci took an outlet pass down the left wing, took the puck to the top of the circle and torqued a backhand shot on Gustavsson. The puck slipped through the crease to where Satan was waiting on the other side to bang home the rebound for his seventh of the year to even the game at 8:01.

Bruins’ defenseman Mark Stuart did not play and was sent back to Boston with cellulitis in his hand and Dennis Seidenberg left the game in the first with a cut on his arm and did not return.

Three Stars

Miroslav Satan — Got his seventh and eighth goals as a Bruin which tied the game then won it in overtime.

Tuukka Rask — The man behind the mask has been the Bruins best stalwart of late and stood tall against the Leafs to earn the vital two points.

Zdeno Chara — The Bruins captain was had to dig deep with the Bruins very shorthanded on defense after Dennis Seidenberg left the game with a cut to his arm and Mark Stuart was shipped back to Boston with cellulitis in his hand. Chara logged 32:53 of ice time and led the team in blocked shots to help keep the puck out of the net.

Turning Point – Phil Kessel had a self pass off the wall at center ice in the that created a 2-on-1 with Tomas Kaberle midway through overtime. Kessel had space and tried to center the puck, but it was broken up in front of Rask to end the threat. Less than a minute later, the Bruins came back to score the game winner of Chara’s shot and Satan’s deflection.

Key Play — Chara set up from the point and delivered one of his patented slap shots that deflected off of Satan’s stick with enough power to flash passed Gustavsson to earn the vital two points.

Read More: Colton Orr, David Krejci, Jonas Gustavsson, Miroslav Satan

Second period summary: Bruins vs. Maple Leafs

04.03.10 at 8:45 pm ET
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Giving David Krejci some new wingmen has paid off, for a period at least.

Boston got back into the game with its first goal in 88:01 of game play. Captain Zdeno Chara started a break out when he hit the open Krejci in the neutral zone going down the left wing. Krejci broke through the zone and got to the top of the face off circle before torquing his body and throwing a backhand wrist shot on Gustavsson that rebounded through the crease to Miroslav Satan perfectly positioned on the other side for the bang back score.

An opportunity came for Boston via the power play when Christian Hansen took an interference call at 10:45. The Bruins had good puck control on the man-advantage (which has not always been the case this season) though the Leafs penalty kill blocked a series of shots including two by Rickard Wallin on consecutive Chara shots from the point to kill off the penalty.

Dennis Seidenberg did not return after cutting his arm in the first period and are now quite shorthanded on defense combined with the loss of Mark Stuart to cellulitis. Regardless, Boston played much better in the second period and outshot the Leafs nine to eight and trail the game in the category 22 to 14.

Read More: David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Jonas Gustavsson, Miroslav Satan

First period summary: Bruins vs. Maple Leafs

04.03.10 at 7:51 pm ET
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If there was ever a must-win game, Saturday at Air Canada Centre in Toronto is that kind of game for the Bruins.

The results will be twofold. Foremost, the Bruins are only a point ahead of the Thrashers and tied with Flyers for the final two playoff spots in the Eastern Conference. Secondly, if Boston wants to get a top two pick in the NHL Entry Draft this summer, they have to beat the team whose pick they own to keep them down in the standings.

So, you would think that the Bruins would be motivated and jump on the division rival Leafs early, right?

Not so much.

Toronto took the early lead at 5:10 into the game when Colton Orr, much more known for his bruising than goal scoring, pushed a rebound off a Dion Phaneuf shot pased Tuukka Rask to open the scoring.

Four minutes later the Leafs would have a big chance to make it a two-goal advantage when Michael Ryder went to the penalty box for hooking at 9:15. He was followed there 23-seconds later by Dennis Seidenberg who took a boarding call to set up 1:37 of two-man advantage ice time for Toronto.

The Bruins registered the kill and came back down the ice to put pressure on Leafs’ goaltender Jonas Gustavsson but a shot hit the cross bar and bounced back out of the crease to end the threat.

During Seidenberg’s penalty he had to leave the box with a cut on his forearm that needed medical attention. Defenseman Mark Stuart is not with the team after getting sent back to Boston with cellulitis, a skin infection, in his hand. Andrew Bodnarchuk has been recalled from Providence on an emergency basis.

Toronto has been the better team through the first 20 minutes and lead the Bruins in shots by nine, 14 to five.

Read More: Colton Orr, Dennis Seidenberg, Jonas Gustavsson, Mark Stuart

Ryder, Wheeler among prominent line changes

04.02.10 at 1:57 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — There was a little bit of a new look to the lines at Bruins practice at Ristuccia on Friday.

The normal line groupings by sweater color were blown up by coach Claude Julien. Instead of the normal David Krejci, Blake Wheeler, Michael Ryder line wearing grey, Krejci was joined by Marco Sturm and Miroslav Satan in white sweaters to make the All-European line. Wheeler still skated in grey just this time with Vladimir Sobotka and Brad Marchand. Milan Lucic took Sturm’s spot on the line with Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi.

That left the normal red, checking, line — Steve Begin, Shawn Thornton, Daniel Paille and Trent Whitfield.

Oh yeah. And Ryder.

“Whoever plays together I think we can definitely play together and get shots on net,” Ryder said by the way of a non-committal response when asked if he saw the red sweater as a demotion.

Julien admitted that the shake up was definitely part of a wake up call that the coaching staff is giving to certain players, like Ryder, Wheeler, Sturm and Lucic, who have been pretty stale of late.

“You saw it today, making some changes, we have got to find some ways of making consistency here,” Julien said. “There is a lot of stuff being done to get those guys going but at the same time we have to make changes on the ice. We are struggling to score goals and, you know, you got certain guys who just aren’t going while and you hope that making changes will either spark them, wake them up or at least give some different lines some better opportunities.”

The situation is getting serious for Ryder. He has one goal since Feb. 13 and has been held without a shot in three of his last four games. For a guy who is supposed to be the sniper, that is not the way things are supposed to work. He admitted that it was in his mind that the demotion to the red sweater could further lead to a demotion where he has no sweater, red, grey or Black and Gold.

“Definitely, it could happen,” Ryder said. “When you are looked at to score goals and you’re not scoring it is definitely in mind but I just have to keep working hard right now and step it up even another notch.”

For Ryder, he would have to step up a first notch before “stepping it up even another,” which he said twice in his five-minute scrum with reporters. He also said that he has been focused on battling though shooting the puck has not been his top priority.

“It makes a difference when everybody on your line is shooting the puck, getting chances and getting more opportunities you have a better chance of scoring,” Ryder said. “I was not thinking about shooting a lot. Sometimes you just have to pound those areas and if you get out of position you don’t get that shot. Now it is just about battling hard and trying to get to those areas and get pucks on net.”

Wheeler was also held without a shot last night and is now on a line with two young players who have been on the fringe of the roster (or in Providence) for most of the year.

“Well, you know, it is sometimes good, almost refreshing to see new faces, play with new guys. Changes like that are always welcome,” Wheeler said. “Anytime you go the majority of two games and zeroes goals, one at the end  of the Devils game, change is probably a good thing.”

Wheeler had the Bruins best opportunity with a short-handed 2-on-1 break with Krejci as his trailer but let the opportunity fizzle out in front of him without putting the puck on net. He explained the play Friday morning.

“It is disappointing,” Wheeler said. “It was a play in the game that could have made it different and obviously you expect more out of yourself and I just didn’t make the play, that is all there is to it.”

After Recchi called out some of his teammates for not giving their best effort Thursday night and two games with only one goal, changes to the lines in some way or form were to be expected on Friday. In the dogfight that the Bruins find themselves, it will definitely take all 20 skaters to make sure their last five games are not their last of the season.

“In a way it is not that complicated, if guys work their butts off things will happen, no matter who they play with,” Julien said.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, Claude Julien, Marco Sturm, Michael Ryder

Julien vs. Ryder: Two takes on same problem

04.02.10 at 11:33 am ET
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Claude Julien was pulling no punches following Thursday’s 1-0 head-scratching loss to the Florida Panthers at TD Garden.

“There’s no doubt we have some players who could’ve been much better for us,” the Bruins coach said. “And a lot of those players are the players we need to help us get through this. You can’t stand here and say, ‘We were outstanding.’ We just lost the game. If everyone were as good as they could be, we would have won this game.”

And if punches equate to shots on net, Michael Ryder wasn’t throwing any.

And therein lies the fundamental problem Julien had with his team and the player he considers his best shooter on the team.

“Ryder is probably our best shooter and ends up with zero shots,” Julien said. “Those are the things we needed from those players.” Julien. “I thought Ryder played a much better game in New Jersey and we needed more out of him [Thursday] as well.

“He’s one of a few more that we needed more out of.”

But Julien made it a point to say that Ryder was hardly alone. There’s Blake Wheeler, without a goal in nine games.

“The chances… Wheeler goes on the 2-on-1 and doesn’t get shot.” Julien on Wheeler’s short-handed chance in third period.

But Ryder said the effort is still there.

“If I had an answer maybe we could figure it out,” Ryder said. “It’€™s definitely disappointing when you’€™re supposed to have the advantage at home and you can’€™t find a way to put wins together. We have one more game left here, I think, and it’€™s a big game. We have to make sure we get a win there. Right now every point counts and we are on the road for Toronto and Washington. Two big games and we have to find ways to put the puck in the net.”

Ryder has just one goal in his last 18 games.

“It has been a tough year overall for us scoring goals,” Ryder said. “We got that time of year where you have to find ways [to score]. It’€™s getting into the grind with only five games left. We need to start getting some wins and getting ourselves some space. But we did a lot of good things tonight that we can look at. It’€™s just a matter of us still throwing pucks at the net and maybe getting more traffic or maybe bearing down a little bit more.”

Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Michael Ryder, NHL

Always believe in BC

04.02.10 at 11:09 am ET
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In one week, Scott Clemmensen will be wrapping up his NHL season as the back-up goalie to Tomas Vokoun with the Florida Panthers.

His season will end on the same weekend his alma mater will be looking for its second NCAA hockey championship in three years as the Boston College Eagles take on the Miami Redhawks in the national semifinals on Thursday in Detroit.

It was in 2001, Clemmensen’s senior year at the Heights, when he led the Eagles to their first NCAA hockey title in 52 years.

Drafted by the Devils in 1997, Clemmensen had a successful career at BC before becoming the first player born in Iowa to play in the NHL.

He played his first NHL game in 2004 and spent parts of several seasons with the Devils and Maple Leafs before signing on as a free agent last summer with Florida.

On Thursday night, he turned away all 36 Bruins shots for a 1-0 win, his first shutout of the season.

“I was hoping I got my first shut out before April,” Clemmensen quipped. “Better late than never.

“They came at us pretty good. We killed penalties really well. I got kind of lucky on some saves here and there. I know they are a little bit of a snake bitten team right now and that played to my advantage. A couple of those saves I got pretty lucky.”

To do what he did on Thursday took on added significance because of the building he was in.

“I will always have a special place in my heart for Boston,” he said. “I love this city and obviously BC alumni here in this building. I have a lot of good memories in this building as well. A couple bad ones too, so I am trying to stock pile as many as I can. While I’€™m still playing that is the time to do it.”

He even took time to look up in the rafters for some of the banners he’s responsible for.

“Absolutely. I looked at both sides of the scoreboard during the national anthem,” he said with a proud smile. “Both sides have it; Beanpot champs and Hockey East champs. I expect it every year really.”

As for the current edition of the Eagles, he’ll find time to pay attention next weekend.

“I hope BC wins it,” Clemmensen said. “I wish they played this weekend but they do not want to compete with basketball. We are going to have to wait and I wish coach [Jerry] York nothing but the best.”

Read More: Boston College, Bruins, Frozen Four, NCAA Hockey

Recchi doesn’t see everybody there

04.02.10 at 9:50 am ET
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After another frustrating home loss and the Bruins’ second straight game without a regulation goal, B’s coach Claude Julien and team leader Mark Recchi openly questioned the team’s desire and heart.

“We have to find ways to win these games,” Recchi said. “We did in New Jersey because we had everyone in. Tonight, we didn’t have everybody there, so the results are there.”

Julien added that he was frustrated to see the team’s best shooter, Michael Ryder, finish with zero shots on goal. “There’s no doubt we have some players who could’ve been much better for us tonight,” Julien said. “Ryder is probably our best shooter and ends up with zero shots. Those are the things we needed from those players.”

After the game, Julien said the ‘push’ has to come from within the dressing room.

And at 42 years young, it was Recchi pushing the hardest.

“We had a lot of good chances and we just didn’€™t score,” Recchi said. “I mean, we can’€™t ask for much more, effort-wise. I still don’€™t think we had 20 guys tonight, but you know, the guys that were going were generating a lot of opportunities and you got to put those in. We need ‘€“ like I said, this time of year, you need 20 guys, regardless, so that’€™s a little bit of a disappointment, but we definitely controlled the game and played the right way and we should have won this one.”

Recchi saw a Florida Panthers team that, while not in the playoff chase, would come in and play a conservative, hard-checking style. And, when the visitors went up, 1-0, in the first period, that’s exactly what the Bruins got.

“They played hard,” Recchi said. “We knew they were going to play hard. I mean, we’€™ve had some tough games against them this year and, you know, if anybody watches the games and I don’€™t know, I’€™m not sure how many guys do, but they play hard. They compete. They haven’€™t quit. They’€™ve got some young players that want to play well and you know, they’€™ve got some, obviously some leaders over there who are not letting those young guys quit and I don’€™t know if we underestimated them or not, but this time of year, I don’€™t think you should underestimate anybody.

“I’€™ve been on the other end where you’€™re spoiling opportunities and there’€™s nothing more enjoyable when you know you’€™re five games away from the end of the season and if you can hurt somebody’€™s chances of making the playoffs, that’€™s what you play for and that’€™s what those guys are playing for right now.”

Recchi was trying so hard on the ice, he thought he was rewarded midway through the second period when he re-directed a shot and raised his stick a bit prematurely, almost willing the puck in the net when nothing else was working.

“Yeah, I thought it went in, but obviously, it didn’€™t, but yeah, I thought it went in,” Recchi admitted. “We had a lot of good opportunities. Their goalie [Scott Clemmensen] made some good saves. You’€™ve got to give him some credit too, but, you know, a lot of pucks ‘€“ he’€™s a big kid and he played big, and a lot of pucks hit him and we weren’€™t able to capitalize.”

But again, it comes down to having everyone in and Recchi made it clear Thursday night that, with just five games left, that’s something he expects.

“In a game like this, if you have 20 guys, we don’€™t lose, and we still miss,” he said. “[In] New Jersey, we had 20 guys, and we win. It’€™s no secret this time of year. The teams that have guys that are ‘€“ and we talked about this after the last game ‘€“ you might not feel good, but this time of year, chances are you don’€™t feel great but, you know, you have to dig deep down and do it for your teammates, do it for yourself. You have to find ways.

“If you’€™re a goal scorer and you’€™re not scoring goals, you got to be physical; and you got to play great defensively, and if you’€™re a physical guy, then you know, you got to chip in at times, so there’€™s a whole bunch of factors that play into this and I think we have to, with five games remaining, I think we shouldn’€™t have to be talking about it, but the results are there. [If] we don’€™t have 20 guys, we don’€™t win, and [if] we do, we win.”

Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Mark Recchi, NHL
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