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Inside the Bruins locker room

05.04.10 at 3:02 am ET
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Bruins players Marc Savard, Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron, Miroslav Satan and Tuukka Rask talk about their Game 2 win over the Flyers in the Eastern Conference semifinals.

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Claude Julien press conference

05.04.10 at 3:02 am ET
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Bruins coach Claude Julien speaks to the media following the B’s Game 2 win over the Flyers.

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Carcillo: ‘Men don’t bite’

05.03.10 at 11:02 pm ET
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There are moments that define every series.

On Monday night, the bad boy of the Philadelphia Flyers claimed he was bitten in a scrum after a second period whistle. The Bruins said Dan Carcillo was just looking for attention by trying to pull the teeth out of the mouth of Marc Savard.

After Milan Lucic scored with just 2:57 left in regulation, it was the Bruins who had taken a bite out of the heart of the Flyers with a 3-2 win, taking a 2-0 series lead to Philadelphia for Game 3 Wednesday night.

But afterward, the hottest topic was that moment when Carcillo and Savard became entangled in a scrum with 14:05 left in the second period.

Carcillo was asked point blank if he was bitten on the finger, as was first reported on TV by TSN in Canada during the game.

“I did get [teethmarks],” said Carcillo, who said he was not bleeding after. “Last time I’ve been bit was in grade school. It’s not a good feeling.”

“It’s pretty cowardly.” said Carcillo, who laughed at Savard’s claim he was trying to pull Savard’s teeth out. “Yeah, that’s what I do when I get in a scrum. I try to pull people’s teeth out. Whatever, man, he bit me.”

Was Carcillo surprised that he was allegedly bitten?

“Yeah,” Carcillo said. “Guys don’t bite. Men don’t bite.”

But even Carcillo’s own teammate, Mike Richards, found the accusation a little hard to believe.

“I don’t know,” Richards said thinking out loud. “Maybe he bit himself. I have no idea what happened there.”

Carcillo was the focal point of what was a very physical second period. Earlier in the game, with 6:50 left in the opening period, Carcillo ran at Steve Begin with a high hit near the head in the neutral zone. Begin retaliated with a cross check, and the Flyers were awarded a power play.

Read More: biting, Bruins, Dan Carcillo, Flyers

Lucic’s winner give Bruins 2-0 series lead

05.03.10 at 9:45 pm ET
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Summary — The Flyers twice came back from a one-goal deficit before the Bruins reasserted their will in the third, paving the way for a 3-2 win and a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinals. Milan Lucic scored the game-winner in the third to wrap up the victory for the Bruins. Tuukka Rask won his third straight playoff game with 24 saves, and once again out-dueled Brian Boucher, who took the loss by allowing three goals on 27 shots.

With the game tied at two heading into the final minutes of the third, David Krejci battled behind Boucher and sent a bouncing puck of a Flyers’ stick into the slot where Lucic settled it down and banged it home for the game-winner at 17:03.

After a strong start to the first period for the Flyers, the Bruins tampered the Philadelphia heat when Patrice Bergeron won a face off to the right of Boucher straight to the stick of defenseman Johnny Boychuk. Boychuk slipped a wrist shot with enough vigor on it through traffic to the top of the net and Boston had its second early lead of the series at 5:12.

Philadelphia came back late in the first when it used its aggressive two-man forecheck to break down the defensive pair of Matt Hunwick and Dennis Wideman coming out of the Bruins defensive zone. The trio of Ville Leino, Danny Briere broke down the exit and pushed the puck around the back of the net to Mike Richards who circled in from the circle to put the puck to the far side of Rask to make it 1-1 at 17:06.

Miroslav Satan continued his hot postseason in the second period when he put the Bruins back up at 9:31. The Flyers had been aggressively attacking the point of action on the puck to disrupt the Bruins flow in the offensive zone. Krejci was able to create a seem of space on the half wall and kick the puck to Wideman and then onto Blake Wheeler, who caught Satan on the dot on Boucher’s left and put a wrist shot into the net to make it 2-1.

Boston was guilty of one of hockey’s greatest pet peeves — allowing a goal in the last minute of a period. Leino and Briere rushed down the wing with a little give-and-go game that ended with the puck on Briere’s and a wrister above Rask to tie the game at two with 21.8 seconds left in the second.

Three Stars

Danny Briere — The feisty forward has pushed the Flyers attack through the first two games of the series and was instrumental in their first two goals with an assist in the first and a lamp-lighter in the second.

Miroslav Satan — Scored his fourth goal of the playoffs and extended his point streak to five games. Also had an assist on Lucic’s game-winner. The forward has nine points in the Bruins eight playoff games thus far.

Tuukka Rask — Solid when he needed to be in holding the Flyers to two goals and sending the series back to Philadelphia with the Bruins up two games.

Turning Point – Boston took control of the momentum in the second half of the third period when the Flyers took a couple of penalties to Arron Asham and Briere, as the Bruins turned the play around and held on after a fury of a Philadelphia attack through the late second period and beginning of the third.

Key Play — Lucic’s game-winner. The hulking forward scored his first of the playoffs in a big way when he settled the bouncing puck, turned and fired to beat Boucher low to his stick side.

Read More: Brian Boucher, Danny Briere, David Krejci, Johnny Boychuk

2nd Period summary: Bruins vs. Flyers Game 2

05.03.10 at 8:49 pm ET
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Meet Boston’s newest public enemy No. 1: Dan Carcillo. He figures to be a central figure in the third as the Bruins and Flyers are tied, 2-2, after 40 minutes.

After four-plus periods of wide-open play and scoring chances, the second period of Game 2 finally felt like the Flyers-Bruins of the 1970s.

There were hard hits, late hits and retaliatory penalty calls.

And there was the first true run at Marc Savard after a whistle.

Six minutes into the period, with the game tied, 1-1, Dennis Wideman fired a shot to the right of Brian Boucher, where Savard was standing. Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen and Carcillo went after Savard to protect Boucher.

Savard, frustrated, took a whack at Boucher after the whistle and was called for a slash.

Earlier, it was Carcillo who went up high on Steve Begin at center ice near the boards. Begin retaliated and was called for a cross-check. In both cases, the crowd fired up the Bruins penalty kill. After 40 minutes, the Bruins are a perfect 4-for-4 on the PK.

The Bruins exacted the best revenge when Miroslav Satan fired a shot five-hole on Boucher at 9:31 for a 2-1 Bruins lead. Dennis Wideman assisted on the goal and has a four-game playoff point streak while Satan has scored in five straight games for the Bruins, starting with Game 4 against Buffalo.

But these Fighting Flyers tied the game with just 24.8 seconds remaining when Daniel Briere came out of the penalty box and flew down the right wing, beating Rask with a laser wrister to the far side.

Read More: Bruins, Daniel Briere, Flyers, Stanley Cup Playoffs

1st Period summary: Bruins vs. Flyers Game 2

05.03.10 at 7:53 pm ET
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This game already has a different feel than Game 1. Like Game 1 there were two goals in the opening period and the Bruins did take the lead. But the Flyers fought back to tie it, 1-1, at the first intermission.

Aside from generating a scrum and a shot on Brian Boucher in the opening 15 seconds, the Bruins didn’t have nearly the jump or energy they had in Game 1. Shawn Thornton made his series debut on a line with Steve Begin and Blake Wheeler and immediately made his presence known by crashing the net.

Still, the Bruins managed to break the ice on a great combination of a face-off win by Boston’s best on the draw and a good shot through a heavy screen.

Patrice Bergeron won his offensive zone draw cleanly to the right of the Flyers goalie and drew it back to Johnny Boychuk. The young B’s blueliner, just above the circle, fired a quick wrister through a screen that Boucher didn’t see till it was behind him, beating the Flyers netminder to the short side at 5:12 even strength.

The Flyers responded with a screen-goal of their own when Mike Richards pulled a Wayne Gretzky-esque move with puck behind Tuukka Rask. Richards skated from the end line out to the left dot curled around and used a nice screen from Danny Briere to beat Rask with just 2:54 left in the opening period.

The Flyers were 0-for-2 on the power play but spent a lot more time in the Bruins zone than the opening period Saturday.

The Flyers also outshot the Bruins, 10-7, in the opening 20 minutes.

Read More: Bruins, Flyers, Johnny Boychuk, Mike Richards

Thornton prefers playing: ‘Watching hockey sucks’

05.03.10 at 1:24 pm ET
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Shawn Thornton is not the type to sit and watch his team mates go up and down the ice in an intense playoff game. Yet, in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Flyers, Thornton found himself a healthy scratch watching from media Level 9 of TD Garden, his heart trying to escape his chest every scoring chance the Bruins had on Philadelphia goaltender Brian Boucher.

“I want to be in every series. It is the best time of year, what you work for all summer and all winter long to get to this point. Watching hockey sucks. I would rather be playing,” Thornton said after the morning skate on Monday before Game 2. “I watched the second and third. The first I was working out. I can’t stand it. I almost had a heart attack. It is way harder to watch than it is to play. When you are involved you are in the flow but when you are up top or in the back room watching the game, every chance your heart jumps out of your chest, so it is tough but it is exciting as well. As I said before, I would rather be playing and that is one of the reasons because it sucks to have to sit there.”

Thornton will likely be in the lineup for Game 2, but not under the circumstances that anybody would find ideal. With Marco Sturm going down for the rest of the season (and the beginning of next) with two torn ligaments in his right knee, Thornton will resume his spot on the checking line and get down to business against the bruising Flyers attack. Thornton is a good Bruins citizen. He is always accountable, always present and always wants to play. There are more talented skaters among the Bruins forwards but he brings a lot of heart to the dressing room and the rink. He cannot see himself in the lineup as any type of reward because another one of the standout clubhouse guys has to face surgery and months of rehabilitation.

“I wouldn’t use the word rewarded. A good friend, good team mate is down. It is tough. I don’t like how it happened with the injury but I am going to get in the lineup and try to play as well as I can,” Thornton said.

A lot of people scratched their heads when Thornton was the man to sit as opposed to a player like Blake Wheeler, who has been ineffective around the goal and prone to turnovers through the end of the season and the playoffs. The thought was that, since the Flyers are so physical and aggressive, that Boston would need a player of Thornton’s talents to help counterbalance Philadelphia’s style. Former Bruins player and coach and current NESN and NBC hockey analyst Mike Milbury said on the Dale and Holley show recently that sitting Thornton would be a crime.

‘€œI would shed a real tear if I were a Bruins fan, if that happens,’€ Milbury said. ‘€œI don’€™t think his presence in the lineup is given enough importance by the people in management, frankly. I’€™ve seen him sort of get jerked around this year and I thought it was a mistake. If he doesn’€™t play tomorrow I think it is a mistake, and if he doesn’€™t play every game the rest of the way I think it’€™s a crime.’€

Crime averted though it took a catastrophe to happen.

Unlike Milbury, Thornton is not suited to the media level. He joked around with reporters that they had it easy on Level 9 but ultimately, it is just not his style.

“The game is so much easier on the ninth level. That is why you guys [the media] make so much money, huh? I kind of prepare the same way I would for any other game. It is easier up there, you can see things happen before they happen. It is a lot quicker on ice level so I just come out and do what I do,” Thornton said.

Read More: Marco Sturm, Shawn Thornton,
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