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No update on Adam McQuaid, Shane Hnidy ready to go for Bruins

05.04.11 at 11:42 am ET
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Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid was not on the ice for Boston’s morning skate Wednesday at TD Garden, a sign that he could be out of the lineup for Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals vs. the Flyers. McQuaid left the game in the first period Monday with a sprained neck suffered while trying to hit Flyers forward Mike Richards.

Coach Claude Julien would not offer an update on McQuaid’s status, but in the seemingly likely event that the rookie does not play, veteran Shane Hnidy would take his spot.

“Same as yesterday,” Julien said of McQuaid’s status. “Day-to-day. Nothing more to report on Adam’s situation. I know Shane Hnidy is a guy ready to play, and he’s certainly a possibility in our lineup tonight.”

Hnidy has played in one game this postseason, filling in for an ill Zdeno Chara in Game 2 of the quarterfinals vs. the Canadiens. Hnidy played 4:13 in that contest. After the morning skate, he said he is ready for Wednesday should his number be called.

“The same as any other game,” Hnidy said of his preparation. “I’ve been taking warmups, and it’s the same. I’m prepared to play, and you never know what’s going to happen, so my preparation doesn’t change. I get ready for the game physically and mentally and once gametime comes, I go from there.”

Mark Recchi was the only other regular absent from morning skate, though he has been a participant in morning skates throughout the playoffs.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Adam McQuaid, Shane Hnidy,

Why Tim Thomas vs. James van Riemsdyk is the best show in this series

05.04.11 at 11:15 am ET
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One player nearly evened the series by himself. The other put on perhaps the best pressure goaltending performance of these Stanley Cup playoffs.

James van Riemsdyk had to settle for scoring twice and watching his Flyers fall into another 2-0 hole against the Bruins while dominating every shift he was on the ice.

Tim Thomas saved 52 of 54 shots, including all 10 in overtime, as he single-handedly made sure van Riemsdyk and the Flyers came to Boston in another desperate situation.

Tonight, the two of them will be asked by their teammates to keep it up in this Eastern Conference semifinal series.

Looking back at Game 2, there were several moments that could have put an entirely different perspective on Game 3 tonight. If JVR beats Thomas with six minutes remaining in regulation on a break in on net, the Flyers win. If JVR beats Thomas on a phenomenal shot off a faceoff with just over four seconds remaining in regulation, the Flyers win. If Thomas doesn’t make a save on Philly’s No. 21 on a clean look from the left circle 10 minutes into OT, the Flyers win.

Thomas was ready for every possible scenario on Monday, including that dramatic end of regulation, which also saw Danny Briere miss by a hair of putting Thomas’ save on van Riemsdyk into the net for the game-winner.

‘€œThis is one of the most dangerous faceoff teams in the offensive zone or our defensive zone that we play against,” Thomas said. “They have a lot of different things that they do. They actually already scored once this series in the first game on a play. So I knew even with a few seconds left that the faceoff could be dangerous.

“The way it worked out it came off the faceoff and for just a second there it went behind a screen for me and I found it just as the guy was throwing the first shot to the net but I saw it so late that I couldn’€™t control the rebound. I saw the rebound go over to Danny Briere’€™s feet and in that one hundredth of a second I thought it might be over because he’€™s one of those guys that gets them and you know. He fumbled it for just a second, just long enough for Seidenberg to dive over and block one. I was still waiting for that buzzer and I don’€™t know if by the time it hit me if the buzzer had gone off or not but it was relief when the buzzer happened.’€ Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, James Van Riemsdyk

Mark Recchi on D&C: ‘The pressure’s all on them’

05.04.11 at 10:06 am ET
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Bruins forward Mark Recchi checked in with the Dennis & Callahan show Wednesday morning, hours before the B’s host the Flyers in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

The Bruins have a 2-0 lead as the series moves to Boston. A year ago, the B’s led the Flyers 3-0 in the series before losing in seven games. Recchi said the Bruins have not avoided discussing last year. “We know that. We’ll talk about it. There’s no question we’ll address it,” Recchi said. “We’ll get ready. Our thing is: Hey, focus on what we do. Don’t focus on the big picture, focus on tonight. Focus on what we do as a team. Don’t focus so much on them and what’s going on on the outside, what people are saying, what people are talking about. Get in our bubble and let’s get ready for tonight.”

Flyers coach Peter Laviolette said after Game 2 that the pressure is on the Bruins now because they are expected to win. Recchi isn’t buying it. “The pressure’s on them,” Recchi countered. “They have to come in here and win. We went and did our job. They had home ice. The pressure’s all on them. If they don’t win, they’re down 3-0. They can talk all they want about last year and all that, [but] the pressure completely is on them right now.”

Tim Thomas has stood out in goal for Boston and has drawn comparisons to Dominik Hasek for his unconventional yet successful style of flopping all over the crease. “They found a way to stop pucks,” Recchi said of Hasek and Thomas. “It doesn’t matter how, they found a way. There’s a method to their madness, too. Timmy might look like he’s all over the place, but he really knows what he’s doing in there. He’s really controlled, and actually probably controlled in his mind in how he wants to play.”

At 43 years old, Recchi is in his 22nd NHL season. Asked about his ability to continue to produce as the oldest player in the league, Recchi said: “It’s all how you rest and prepare. I’ve got lots left in the tank. ‘€¦ Once playoffs start, I just basically play right now. I don’t do a whole lot of practicing. I just try and keep myself sharp as much as possible.”

Recchi said he does his best to play through pain. “Regardless of my age, I want to be counted on,” he said. “And I want the coach to know that I’m going to be there. And I want my teammates to know I’m going to be there for them all the time.”

Read More: Dominik Hasek, Mark Recchi, Peter Laviolette, Tim Thomas

Bruins-Flyers: Three points heading into Game 3

05.04.11 at 6:58 am ET
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Everyone knows what happened after Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals last year: a Flyers Game 4 victory followed by three more in what ended up being one of the most devastating ends to a season in Bruins history.

This time around, the Bruins have set about righting that wrong, if it’s possible, and they’re off to the best start they could have through two games: a 2-0 series lead. Even if they take Game 3, it won’t be anything new for a team that was in the same position a year ago, but they’ll be sitting pretty.

It looks like they’ll have to play Game 3 without Adam McQuaid, as the rookie defenseman sprained his neck trying to hit Mike Richards in Game 2. Expect Shane Hnidy to be in his place for the veterans second game this postseason. Hnidy played just 4:13 in Game 2 of the quarterfinals vs. the Canadiens when he filled in for an ill Zdeno Chara.

Injuries and substitutions aside, Wednesday’s game is a pivotal one. As the B’s saw last week, winning Game 3 when you’re down 2-1 can change plenty, and that’s what the Flyers will aim to do. On the other hand, if the B’s can grab a 3-0 series lead, they’ll be in good position to do what 99% of teams do with 3-0 leads. Here are a few quick points on where things stand entering a big game at the Garden:

KREJCI REMAINS KEY

Sure, the L’s didn’t start coming until game four, but the Bruins suffered a major loss in Game 3 last season when David Krejci broke his wrist. Without Krejci, the B’s weren’t the same team, and it had a lot to do with why Philadelphia was able to crawl back to make it a series.

This year, and after a pedestrian first round vs. the Canadiens, Krejci has been as a big a force as anyone else (except for perhaps Tim Thomas) through two games. After having difficulty finishing plays vs. the Habs, Krejci has lit up the Flyers to the tune of five points in two games, including the game-winner in overtime in Monday’s Game 2.

With Marc Savard making only a 25-game cameo, Krejci was the de facto top center on the team most of the year, yet he didn’t always play like it. Krejci’s a guy who runs hot and cold, but he’s showing that he’s using the right faucet when it counts.

The Bruins aren’t going to sit back and play the “what if” game with what they could have done with a healthy Krejci last year, but so far they’re finding out what they can do with him this year.

THE WINNING WAY: CIRCUMVENTING REGULATION, POWER PLAY?

Four overtime games, zero power play goals, and only one win in which they’ve outshot their opponent. Those are some of the interesting details of the Bruins’ postseason thus far, but they’ll take the results.

The B’s are in no way welcoming more OT games, but given that they’ve won all four they’ve played so far, they’ve got to like the reputation they’ve developed. Contests like Game 2 are ones they most certainly won’t win every time, as Thomas faced 32 shots in the third period and overtime, while the B’s mustered just 12 shots. As they say, a win’s a win. You’d think the B’s would just rather win the way they did in the 7-3 fashion in which they took Game 1.

As for the power play, the mystery of when “the streak” will finally end (they’re at 0-for-29 thus far in the playoffs), is growing in legend. Will it get to 30? 35? It looked better late in the second period Tuesday, and perhaps with the confidence of winning will come the confidence to get this ugly streak out of their heads. The B’s just need to make sure their power play looks more like it did in Game 2 than it did in Game 1, when the Flyers were easily gaining possession and sending it the length of the ice.

THOMAS HAS BEEN IN OCTOBER FORM IN THE PLAYOFFS

Blaming the goaltender would be absurd, but it would be fair to say after the first two games of the quarterfinals that Thomas wasn’t quite where he was earlier in the regular season. The rebounds were big, and the Habs were game-planning around them. Since then, the B’s netminder has played to the lights-out standard he set way back in October. The line of thinking back then was that if the Bruins could get that kind of performance in the postseason, they’d be tough to beat. Well, they’ve gotten that performance, and they sure are tough to beat.

As Brad Marchand pointed out after Game 2, the Bruins had no business winning that game. The Flyers came out harder, played a fantastic game and got 54 shots on Thomas. Yet Thomas was the exception to the rule that if a team can come out flying at home, they should win.

Consider that James van Riemsdyk, who had two goals in the first 9:31 of Game 2 but was stopped on his following bids, should have had even more than the hat trick he didn’t get (we make too many Ovechtrick jokes in this space, explaining the absence of an obvious reference here), but Thomas shut him down on a night nobody else could. Regardless of what an opposing team can throw out there, it seems Thomas, when at his best, trumps all. He may not have the numbers from the first month of the season, but he is playing like it and giving the B’s a great chance to win each night.

Wednesday, it will be interesting to see how each team comes out. The Flyers should be desperate to avoid a 3-0 deficit, but it would be hard to top the effort they gave in Game 2. The Bruins should come out stronger if they don’t want to leave it up to their goaltender again. Even if it does fall in Thomas’ hands, he proved in Game 2 that he can handle it.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, David Krejci, James Van Riemsdyk

Tim Thomas and the Bruins know ‘It’s better to be on this end’

05.04.11 at 6:57 am ET
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The Bruins and Flyers are back in Boston for Game 3 tonight at TD Garden (7 p.m.) and there’s no extended wait between Games 2 and 3 like there is with the Celtics and Heat. And that’s probably a good thing on many levels for the Bruins.

There’s little time to think about being up two games in the series, having dominated the Flyers in pretty much every aspect of the game – except the power play, of course. There’s little time to answer questions about what it’s like being on the flip side of the 2-0 equation just one series after wiping out the deficit and beating the Canadiens in seven games.

These Bruins aren’t about to complain about being up two games despite losing to the Flyers in a similar position last year and overcoming the 0-2 hole in the last round.

‘€œWell it’€™s good to be on the other side this round,” Game 2 hero David Krejci said. “We can control our own things and bring it back to our building. We are going to use our fans as our seventh player and just go out there and take it game by game. Hopefully we can win the third one and go from there.’€

‘€œLike Dave said, it’€™s better to be on this end,” added Tim Thomas, who stopped 52 of 54 shots Monday, including all 10 in OT. “We do know from the way that we were able to come back last series though that a 2-0 lead in a series doesn’€™t mean that the series is over. We still have a lot of work in front of us. As long as we take the same approach one game at a time, one period at a time, one shift at a time I think that’€™s the right approach. So that’€™s the way we will approach it going forward.’€

2010 met 2011 in the post-game following Game 2 when a reporter asked Bruins coach Claude Julien if he realizes how tenuous a two-game lead can be. Sure, it’s a great spot to be in heading home but the Bruins know what the Canadiens did.

‘€œWell, you know, it is a nice position to be in, especially when you win the first two on the road,” Julien said. “There is no doubt that it is the perfect scenario for the first two games on the road, but we are not thinking about that. We are thinking about this year. Probably half the players were not even here last year, so we can bring up whatever we want. Our goal here is to focus on what is happening this year. What happened last year is last year, so it hasn’€™t really been on our minds. We have absolutely learned from that. We are using those kinds of things as a learning tool.

‘€œThey took a two to nothing lead and we never gave up. I believe teams that make is this far are teams that have a lot of character. We know they are not going to give up, and we know has what happened with this team. They are capable of bouncing back just as they did in the last round, so we have to be ready for them. We need to understand that the second half of tonight’€™s game was not good enough for this hockey club. We hold ourselves responsible for higher standards, and we are going to have to be better.’€

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, David Krejci

Bruins know they can’t get comfortable being up 2-0

05.03.11 at 2:04 pm ET
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It can be tempting to think a series is over once a team takes a two-game lead, but no one around the Bruins is thinking that way ‘€” or at least not publicly admitting it. After coming back from a 2-0 series deficit against the Canadiens in the first round this year and blowing a 3-0 series lead against the Flyers last year, the Bruins know this series is far from over.

“I’€™m not looking so much at where we are in the series more than what’€™s at stake in [Wednesday] night’€™s game and how well we have to play,” Claude Julien said. “The rest will take care of itself. If we play well, we’€™ll be up by another game. I don’€™t think there’€™s anybody in that dressing room, including the coaching staff and players, who’€™s sitting comfortably right now.”

Defenseman Andrew Ference concurred with his coach and said that feeling complacent or expecting anything to come easy would be a recipe for disaster.

“I don’€™t think we need to look too far back to know that guys aren’€™t going to be too comfortable with leads and to know that the playoffs are hard-fought and you have to earn victories,” Ference said. “I think it would be silly for anybody to think that the guys in this locker room are comfortable.”

In fact, the Bruins know there are still plenty of areas they can improve. One is obviously the power play, which is now 0-for-29 in the playoffs after going 0-for-2 Monday night.

“We’ve talked about that quite a bit,” Julien said of the power play. “I’m getting tired of it, actually. I think yesterday we certainly moved the puck a lot better. We spent more time in their end. We had some chances and we just didn’t bury them. To me, although we didn’t score, I thought our power play was better. If we can keep getting better, hopefully we’ll get the result here soon.”

Julien said his team will also have to do a better job of playing its game for the full 60 minutes and not getting away from the game plan. That was a problem in the third period of Game 2, when the Bruins got outshot 22-7 and only managed to force overtime because of the great play of Tim Thomas in net.

“We just totally lost focus on the things we had to do,” Julien said. “We kind of got caught in the run-and-gun type of game. Certainly that’€™s never served us well in the past, to play that type of game. Because of that, you saw some great scoring chances and you saw some breakaways. They had a lot of space in the neutral zone.

“Those are the kinds of adjustments we’€™re talking about. We have to get a little bit better as far as the 60-minute focus on the things we have do in order to minimize those scoring chances that they seem to have gotten yesterday.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Claude Julien,

Adam McQuaid day-to-day with sprained neck

05.03.11 at 12:45 pm ET
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Defenseman Adam McQuaid is day-to-day with a sprained neck, Claude Julien said Tuesday. McQuaid suffered the injury when he crashed face-first into the boards after missing a check on the Flyers’ Mike Richards in the first period of Monday night’s Game 2 victory in Philadelphia.

McQuaid was taken to an area hospital, but he traveled back to Boston with the team after the game. Julien said all the X-rays on McQuaid have come back negative.

If McQuaid can’t go for Wednesday night’s Game 3, Shane Hnidy would likely be his replacement. Steven Kampfer skated Tuesday for the first time since suffering a knee injury back in April, but Julien said he is “still going to be a while.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Adam McQuaid, Shane Hnidy, Steven Kampfer
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