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Countdown to Game 7, 8 a.m.: What they’re saying in Montreal

04.27.11 at 8:04 am ET
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By now, you likely have read about Game 6 (and 7) from a Boston perspective. But what are they saying in Montreal after the Canadiens’ 2-1 victory Tuesday night?

In the Montreal Gazette, Dave Stubbs writes that Bruins forward Milan Lucicfinally stepped out of invisibility” and “found a way to put his mark” on the series. For those who, like Lucic, disagree with the five-minute major and game misconduct penalty, Stubbs writes that’s “beyond ridiculous.”

Also in the Gazette, Pat Hickey takes Boston Herald writer Stephen Harris to task for criticizing the Canadiens after Game 5 for icing the puck too much. Hickey writes that the Bruins are just as boring and defensive-minded as the Habs. However, Red Fisher writes that this series is an example of what makes hockey beautiful.

If you want to hear Dennis & Callahan’s initial thoughts on the Game 6 loss from Wednesday morning’s show, click here for the audio. And here’s Jon Meterparel‘s breakdown of the game.

Countdown to Game 7

Countdown to Game 7, 7 a.m.: Another look at the Milan Lucic hit

04.27.11 at 6:55 am ET
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So you want to see what all the hubbub is about regarding Milan Lucic‘s hit from Tuesday night? Well, see for yourself.

As mentioned before, the great Jerry Thornton expertly broke down the 10 best reasons you should be glad you might be rooting for the Bruins tonight instead of the Canadiens. Here is a sample:

10. We’ve got other options

I and everyone I know would love to see the Bruins win the Cup. Hell, I know some hardcore puckheads who want it so bad they’d sacrifice anything — their health, personal wealth, the feel of a woman’s touch — just to see it happen. But if doesn’t, the sun’s still coming up tomorrow. The Boston hockey public will do what we’ve always done. We’ll flip to the Celtics‘ playoffs and check the Red Sox standings and set our Patriots draft board and move on with our awesome, successful, enviable lives.

Once the Habs are bounced from the playoffs, their fans will do what they’ve always done: Wallow in misery, demand the coach be fired and the goalie get traded and start counting the days til the 2011-12 season. Because what else do they have in their empty, joyless lives? The Alouettes? The jaunty Alouettes of Canadian football? Puhleeze. Twenty-yard end zones, three downs and 60-yard lines are an abomination and against the Laws of Nature. Plus, as George Steinbrenner once pointed out, Montreal is supposedly one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world but it can’t even support a Major League Baseball team. And making me agree with a pompous gasbag (rest his soul) like King George is by itself enough to make me hate Les Habitants.

9. Our iconic legendary goalie is eternally cooler than their iconic legendary goalie

Ken Dryden was a massive, coolly efficient, articulate, cerebral Ivy Leaguer with movie star looks. Gerry Cheevers was a short, squat slob who blew snot rockets on the ice, was balding in his mid-20s and spent every waking off-ice hour at the racetrack. He also took ridiculous chances leaving the crease and skating up ice with the puck and swung his stick at opposing forwards like the bride in ‘€œKill Bill’€ fighting off the Crazy 88s. But we’re three decades after they both retired and Cheesie still is inspiring T-shirts, sports memorabilia figurines as well as the song ‘€œI Feel Like Gerry Cheevers (Stick Marks on My Heart)’€ by the band Chixdiggit. Dryden is remembered as the guy who almost nodded off in the booth as Al Michaels was calling the end of the Lake Placid Miracle on Ice game.

You’ll have to click here to read the rest.

<a href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=581fe24db2″ mce_href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=581fe24db2″ >Countdown to Game 7</a>

Countdown to Game 7, 6 a.m.: Bruins fans, it’s time to move on

04.27.11 at 6:08 am ET
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All throughout Wednesday, we will be updating the blog as to the latest and greatest when it comes to all things Bruins and Canadiens as they head into Game 7 at the TD Garden. Let’s start with everything you would want to know about Game 6:

The Bruins weren’t going to use the officiating as a crutch when breaking down their Game 6 loss. Mike Petraglia, who was in Montreal, explains.

Petraglia also caught up with Mark Recchi, who, like most Bruins fans, was bemoaning a lack of a power play by the B’s.

Guess who is waiting the Bruins if they win Wednesday? D.J. Bean lets you know. Spoiler: It’s the Flyers.

Speaking of Bean, he breaks down Game 6 from the Bell Centre while taking a good, hard look at what is facing the Bruins in Game 7.

And to help all Bruins fans get in a better frame of mind heading into the decisive showdown Wednesday night, Jerry Thornton offers 10 reasons why you should feel lucky you’re rooting for the Bruins and not the Canadiens.

Countdown to Game 7

Powerless: B’s aren’t about to complain about officiating on the eve of Game 7

04.27.11 at 12:15 am ET
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After getting what many observers clearly felt was the raw end of the deal from the men in striped shirts Tuesday night, the Bruins still were not about to take a page out of the book of Mike Gillis.

He is the Vancouver Canucks general manager who lambasted the NHL and its officiating crew on Monday, just about 24 hours before its Game 7 Tuesday against the defending Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks Tuesday night.

Yes, the Bruins were put on not one but TWO 5-on-3 disadvantages and the Canadiens scored both times in a 2-1 win to force Game 7 less than 24 hours later in Boston. Yes, the major penalty to Milan Lucic for boarding seemed harsh, even if Jaroslav Spacek was bleeding from the head. And yes, the Bruins can’t really complain about the power play since they yet to convert a single one of 19 chances in the series.

But these Bruins know they still have Game 7 ahead. They figure that eventually the breaks have to even out – with the whistles and on the scoresheet, right?

But still it was a crushing blow to lose your top scorer with more than half the game remaining in a 1-1 contest in Game 6. But that’s what happened when Lucic was shown the gate when Spacek showed the officials blood from the hit just under five minutes into the second period – and just moments after the Bruins had tied it.

“Well, I’€™m not going to comment on it, and simply not for not getting any information, but I haven’€™t had any chance to really look at it closely,” Julien said cleverly. “And you see quick replays here and there but it’€™s something that I need to see here before I’€™m able to comment on that.”

“I can’t comment because I heard it but haven’t seen a replay at all,” added Mark Recchi. “Strange game and a lot of strange things happened out there but it’s part of it. I think 5-on-5 we were a very good hockey team tonight and we have to take that positive and go home and have our home crowd. We’ve been in this before. We have to stay focused, stay relaxed, stay positive and go from there.

“I’m not going to focus too much on what happened. It’s over now. We have to worry about [Wednesday] and can’t dwell on it and have to embrace what’s coming up [in Game 7].”

Added Patrice Bergeron, “I didn’t get a good look at it so I can’t comment on it but obviously, losing Looch, he means a lot.”

Then there was this from Tim Thomas that summed up the Bruins’ frustration.

“It was no harder than any other game,” Thomas said with a wry smile. “Obviously, when it’s 5-on-3, it’s harder to keep the puck out of the net. I’m not a forward. I don’t make or take those type of hits. I’ve already heard from some of the guys on their take on it but I don’t have one. I’m just a goalie.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Milan Lucic

Mark Recchi with the cold, hard truth: Bruins’ power play ‘needs to be a lot better than that’

04.26.11 at 11:02 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Moments after losing Game 6 to the Canadiens, 2-1, on a pair of 5-on-3 goals, Bruins veteran Mark Recchi admitted he and his teammates need to do a better job of cashing in on their power play chances. While the Canadiens scored a pair of two-man advantage goals, the Bruins were 0-for-4 on the power play, making them scoreless in 19 chances during the series.

“We had opportunities but it wasn’t good enough for power play on our end,” Recchi said. “Five-on-five, we were terrific. They got a couple of 5-on-3 goals. We have to be a lot better, obviously. We’re not getting any sustained pressure to top it off. We’re getting one shot and it’s getting blocked half the time. We’re not getting pucks on net and so it’s one-and-out kind of thing. You have to find your way back in [the offensive zone] and then one-and-out again. We have to sustain pressure. Our power play hasn’t been that bad all year and then for right now, it hasn’t been good in this series. We get the opportunity [Wednesday], we have to step up.”

Recchi was on the Bruins last year when the team lost its last Game 7 on home ice to the Flyers, 4-3. He and the Bruins have a chance at redemption with a win on Wednesday. If they beat the Canadiens, they will again draw the Flyers in the Eastern semis starting this weekend in Philadelphia.

“It’s a big one [Wednesday],” Recchi said. “We’ll go get some rest and be ready. If we play like that 5-on-5 and if we get opportunities on the power play [in Game 7], we have to be a lot better than that.”

Recchi actually has the chance to do something about it on the ice. Claude Julien can only watch from behind the bench as the team continues to look totally out of kilter.

“Well, let’€™s put it this way, our power play is struggling,” Julien said. “I think we’€™ve talked about that every day so far. They scored two goals five-on-three. Five-on-four they weren’€™t a threat and neither were we. Five-on-five I thought we were obviously a team that held most of the control if the game and that’€™s what we have to do. We have to stay disciplined, stay away from the penalty box like we talked about at the beginning of the series.

“But I would have liked to have a five-on-three, maybe our power play would have scored as well. But it wasn’€™t the case and again, it’€™s one of those games where we tried, we worked hard, we had our chances and we weren’€™t able to bury them. But certainly not down or disappointed in our game except for the fact those five-on-threes ended up costing us the game.”

Now, it’s Game 7 – the ultimate test in hockey that the Bruins haven’t won since beating Montreal’s Patrick Roy and his case of appendicitis in 1994 at the old Boston Garden. They have lost their last four attempts, including home games in 2010 vs. the Flyers and 2009 vs. the Hurricanes.

“Just focus on getting ready,” Recchi said. “You’ve gotta relax and you’ve got to get ready to play a one-game series now. We worked all year to get home ice and we’re going home and we’ll go get a lot of rest, and focus on what we have to do, make little adjustments but for the most part we’ll just save our energy and get ready.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Mark Recchi

Flyers await Bruins, if the B’s can make it happen

04.26.11 at 10:51 pm ET
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MONTREAL — The question of whether the Bruins will make it to the Eastern Conference semifinals remains unknown, but their opponent should they win Game 7 has been revealed. The Flyers beat the Sabres, 5-2, in Game 7 of their series to advance to the second round. Should the Bruins beat the Habs in Game 7 Wednesday at TD Garden, they would head to Philadelphia, where they would be hosted by the No. 2 seeded Flyers.

There is painful history between the two clubs for the Bruins, of course. Last season, the teams met in the conference semifinals, and after leading the series three games to none, the B’s let the Flyers win the next four, including a Game 7 in which Boston held a 3-0 lead.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs,

Canadiens beat Bruins to force a Game 7

04.26.11 at 9:40 pm ET
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MONTREAL — The Canadiens have forced a seventh game of the Eastern Conference finals, as they took a 2-1 victory over the Bruins Tuesday night at the Bell Centre. Game 7 will be played Wednesday night in Boston.

With both Shawn Thornton (serving a too many men bench minor) and Dennis Seidenberg (Slashing) in the box, Micahel Cammalleri gave the Habs a 1-0 lead on a blast from the circle at at 10:07 of the first. Seidenberg would make it 1-1 just 48 seconds into the second period, though Brian Gionta would score on another two-man advantage at 5:48 to give the Habs the lead once again.

Milan Lucic was given a five-minute major and game misconduct in the second period for boarding Jaroslav Spacek. The Canadiens defenseman would remain bleeding on the ice for a few moments, though he did return to the game.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR BRUINS

– Once Lucic was tossed from the game, the Bruins didn’t get much from the top line. David Krejci and Nathan Horton combined for just one shot on goal (as many as Lucic had before being ejected), and it seemed Claude Julien was giving looks to multiple forwards in Lucic’s absence, including Michael Ryder, Brad Marchand and Daniel Paille. It was Paille who played with the line for much if the third period.

– It’s hard for a team to win when they are on the wrong end of two separate 5-on-3s. The Habs found themselves with a two-man advantage in both the first and second periods, and scored on both of them.

Denting the B’s chances at a comeback late in the third was a high stick called on Chris Kelly with 3:10 remaining in regulation. The penalty box, as it tends to be, was an enemy Boston’s Tuesday night.

– As great as Patrice Bergeron has been for the Bruins this series, Tuesday was not a night to remember for the B’s center. He negated an early B’s power play (not that it’s such a bad thing) by going off for goaltender interference late in the first. He also caused one of the two-man advantages by flipping the puck over the glass in Boston’s zone.

– While the Canadiens were able to take advantage of special teams, the B’s weren’t. Their power play looked especially dreadful in going 0-for-4 on the night. Through six games, they are now 0-for-19 in this series.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR BRUINS

– Nice play by Dennis Seidenberg early in the second period to step out from behind the net and beat Carey Price on a quasi-wraparound. The goal was his first of the postseason, but with the goal, he now has points in each game at the Bell Centre this series. He had one assist in both Game 3 and Game 4.

Rich Peverley came ready. The third-line winger led the team with five shots on goal and picked up an assist on Seidenberg’s tally in the second period. The 28-year-old now has four points ( 1 G, 3 A) in the last four games of the series.

– The Habs appeared to score the first goal early, as Tim Thomas had no idea where the puck was when it wad mere inches from his blocker. Gionta came flying in to whack it home, but an apparent earlier whistle negated the goal. The referees were more than generous with makeup calls going forward, so ultimately it didn’t pay off as much as it could have.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, David Krejci, Milan Lucic,
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