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Bruins playoff tickets available April 7

04.01.10 at 12:03 pm ET
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In the event that the Bruins make the playoffs, the team announced on Thursday that tickets for the first two home games in the first round will be available on April 7 at 11 a.m.

With six games remaining in the regular season, Boston sits in a three-way tie with the Flyers and Canadiens for the final three playoffs spots. With tie-breakers of the equation the Bruins technically have the seventh seed if the playoffs started today (and would play the Buffalo Sabres). The Thrashers sit two points behind the trio with 80 points. Boston has a game in hand on the Canadiens and Atlanta.

Here is the release from the team:

The Boston Bruins announced today that tickets for the club’s first two home playoff games of the 2010 Stanley Cup Playoffs will go on sale at 11:00 a.m. ET on Wednesday, April 7.

Tickets will be available for purchase at the TD Garden Box Office, on www.bostonbruins.com, and via Ticketmaster.

The Bruins currently sit in seventh place of the Eastern Conference.  The dates and times for the two games will be determined by the National Hockey League once the final seeding for the Stanley Cup Playoffs is set.

If the Bruins do not qualify for the 2010 Stanley Cup Playoffs, full refund of the face value ticket prices will be given for all playoff tickets that were purchased.  Various fees associated with purchasing tickets will not be refunded.

Bruins sign Colborne, Caron

03.31.10 at 12:10 pm ET
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The Bruins on Wednesday morning announced the signing of four players, including first-round draft picks Joe Colborne (2008) and Jordan Caron (2009).

Here is the release from the team:

Boston Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli announced today that the club has signed forward Jordan Caron, forward Joe Colborne, goaltender Michael Hutchinson and defenseman Steven Kampfer to entry-level contracts.

The 19-year-old Caron split this season between Rimouski Oceanic and Rouyn-Noranda Huskies of the QMJHL (Quebec Major Junior Hockey League) after being traded from Rimouski to Rouyn-Noranda on Jan. 9, 2010. The 6-foot-2, 202-pound forward registered 17 goals and 16 assists for 33 points in 23 games with the Huskies and he earned 9-11-20 totals with the Oceanic in 20 games. He currently leads playoff scoring in the QMJHL with six goals for the Huskies and has notched a total of 13 points (6 goals, 7 assists) in the Quebec League playoffs. Caron skated with the Canadian squad that earned a silver medal at the World Junior Championships this past January. A native of Sayabec, Quebec, Caron was drafted by the Bruins in the first round (25th overall) of the 2009 NHL Entry Draft.

The 20-year-old Colborne skated in all 39 games with the University of Denver this season, earning 22-19-41 totals. He recently tallied a power-play goal in the Pioneers’€™ 2-1 loss to the Rochester Institute of Technology in the East Regional semifinal of the NCAA tournament. He finished the season first on the team in power-plays goals (11), first in total goals (22), tied for second in points (41) and second in shots (116). Colborne has played 79 games in two seasons with the Pioneers, registering 32 goals and 40 assists for 72 total points. The Calgary, Alberta, native was drafted by the Bruins in the first round (16th overall) of the 2008 NHL Entry Draft.

The 20-year-old Hutchinson has appeared in 46 regular-season games this season with the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League, registering a .913 save percentage and a 2.86 goals-against average. The goaltender has started all five playoff games this month and has posted a .901 save percentage with a 2.84 GAA. Hutchinson and the Knights recently defeated the Guelph Storm in the opening round of the OHL playoffs, winning the series 4-1. They will face the Kitchener Rangers in a second-round playoff series beginning Thursday. The 6-foot-3, 185-pound Barrie, Ontario, native was drafted by Boston in the third round (77th overall) of the 2008 NHL Entry Draft.

The 21-year-old Kampfer skated in 45 games for the University of Michigan this season, recording three goals, 23 assists (26 points) and 50 PIM. The Wolverines were recently defeated by Miami (Ohio) in the NCAA tournament’s Midwest Regional final. Kampfer finished his senior season ranked third on the team in plus/minus with a plus-18 rating and fourth on the team in shots with 115. Over four seasons with the Wolverines, Kampfer played in 147 games, registering 7-54-60 totals and 134 PIM and was named to the CCHA All-Tournament Team in both his junior season and senior season. The 5-foot-11, 197-pound native of Jackson, Mich., was selected by the Anaheim Ducks in the fourth round (93rd overall) of the 2007 NHL Entry Draft. He was traded from Anaheim to Boston on March 2 in exchange for a conditional fourth-round draft pick.

Hat trick: Statement made?

03.30.10 at 11:05 pm ET
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It’s all right, Bruins fans. You can say that you thought Tuukka Rask would have bested Martin Brodeur in the shootout had another 19 seconds passed.

Goaltending ‘€” and a relentlessly irritating Bruins offense ‘€” took center stage Tuesday night as Patrice Bergeron notched the game-winner in the final minute of overtime to give the Bruins a 1-0 win over New Jersey. The way Brodeur was giving up rebounds and the way the Bruins seemed to just miss capitalizing on them time and time again, it was perfectly fitting that the game ended in the Bruins’ assistant captain collecting the change on a Mark Stuart shot from the point to give Boston a very important two points.

While the Bruins only got on the board once, their peppering of Brodeur (34 shots on goal) provided all the offense necessary to get past one of the game’s all-time greats.

Coming off the win, the Bruins remain in possession of the eighth and final playoff bid in the Eastern Conference. With a game in hand on the Thrashers, a playoff berth is the Bruins’ to lose. Just as interestingly, having played as many games with as many points (76 GP, 82 points), as the Canadiens and Flyers, a sixth seed and potential matchup with the Sabers rather than the Capitals remains in their grasp.

Here is the hat trick of lessons learned in a well-deserved win in which the Bruins defense allowed just 21 shots on goal in nearly 65 minutes:

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Read More: ilya kovalchuk, Martin Brodeur, Patrice Bergeron, Tim Thomas

Rask, Bergeron burn Devils

03.30.10 at 9:38 pm ET
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Summary ‘€“ Patrice Bergeron beat Martin Brodeur with 19 seconds left in overtime to give the Bruins two badly need points on Tuesday night.

On a night that Tuukka Rask seemed destined to be the hero, Bergeron stole the show after Rask was reinserted into the starting lineup, shut out the Devils, and strengthened his hold atop the list of goals against average.

Daniel Seidenberg and Michael Ryder both failed to secure possession for the Bruins in the midst of a rare flurry from the Devils in the final 30 seconds of regulation, but when the clock read 0:00 both Rask and Martin Brodeur had their shutouts intact.

The Devils appeared to be a lost cause offensively through the first two periods, mustering just 11 shots on Rask entering the third period, but back-to-back Bruins’€™ minor penalties, the Devils showed more life in the Bruins’€™ zone despite still not managing many shots. With Matt Hunwick in the box for a delay of game, Zach Parise made it 4-on-4. The teams swapped brief opportunities until the penalties expired, with the Devils coming the closest they would come to getting on the board second later.

David Clarkson nearly made it 1-0 Devils when he beat Tukka Rask glove-side but dinged his wrist-shot off the post. The third-period opportunity wasn’€™t Clarkson’€™s only flirtation with the scoreboard, as Brian Rolston skipped one past him in the second period on what would have been a solid scoring chance.

Ryder, in the midst of a cold streak, had the Bruins’€™ best opportunity to end it regulation when he beat two New Jersey defenders in the third period before being robbed on the goal line by an impressive display buy a sprawling Brodeur.

Rask handled surge from the Devils in the extra five minutes, stopping Parise on a 2-on-2 with about three and a half minutes in overtime. It as one of the Devils’€™ few legitimate scoring opportunities of the night.

Ilya Kovalchuk was positively brutal for the Devils. The play by the Bruins defense deserves much of the credit for the struggles the Devils encountered, but it seemed that whenever Kovalchuk found himself on the cusp of making a play he either made the wrong pass or forget the teams were playing with blue lines. He could have atoned for his lackluster play with about two minutes to go in overtime but fired one right at the chest of Rask for an easy save.

Three Stars

Tuukka Rask ‘€“ Shutout makes it less likely Tim Thomas will be seeing back to back starts again for the rest of the season.

Patrice Bergeron ‘€“ Made the game’€™s lone goal a memorable one.

Martin Brodeur ‘€“ Handled plenty of tough shots from the Bruins and was equally as impressive as Rask in a 33-save performance.

Key play ‘€“ Bergeron’€™s game-winner. Mark Recchi and Mark Stuart got the assists on the rebound from the stick side of the very busy Brodeur.

Turning point ‘€“ Brodeur’€™s save on Ryder’€™s deke. It signified that the Bruins couldn’€™t beat Brodeur with anything but consistent pestering, which was proven in the extra five minutes.

Read More: Bruins, Devils,

Second period summary: Bruins vs. Devils

03.30.10 at 8:30 pm ET
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The scoring sheet dictates that it’€™s been a clean game thus far, but at this rate the Bruins stand to capitalize on how sloppy the Devils have been.

Neither team has seen a player head to the penalty box thus far in a game the Bruins have continued to play well defensively in. The Devils seem more disruptive towards their own offense than toward that of the Bruins. In addition to struggling to stay onside multiple times and lacking shots on goal (just 11 through two), Ilya Kovalchuk absolutely killed a chance in the seventh minute, forgoing a clear shot at Rask for an ill-advised and zone-clearing pass to defensemen Paul Martin.

Former Bruin Brian Rolston wound up ahead of the pack on a bouncing puck along the boards in the Bruins’€™ zone but put too much mustard on a pass in front of the net to Clarkson, clearing the zone before eventually regaining and blasting a slapshot that was picked out of the air by Rask with just under four and a half minutes to play.

Though the Bruins continue to provide plenty of offensive pressure, they remain unable to capitalize, as a rebound from a low Mark Recchi shot bounced nearly all the way to the point before anyone touched it. Many of the Bruins’€™ 22 shots have been low on Brodeur, including one from Michael Ryder, in the midst of a cold streak. No. 73 had a solid opportunity on the doorstep about five minutes into the period that Brodeur held onto.

After two periods the Bruins are outshooting the Devils, 22-11.

Read More: Bruins, Devils,

First period summary: Bruins vs. Devils

03.30.10 at 7:45 pm ET
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The first period between the Bruins and Devils at the Prudential Center was highlighted by strong defense and sporadic yet unsuccessful offensive flurries. The Bruins ended the period with a 13-6 shots on goal advantage and had a handful of realistic opportunities against Devils netminder Martin Brodeur.

The period featured bookend scoring chances for the Bruins. Mark Stuart rang one off the post just over a minute into the period and Steve Begin was robbed in a scrum in front of the net with two and a half to go in a flurry that also featured a bid from Daniel Paille and Patrice Bergeron.

With just under nine minutes to go in the period, Marco Sturm and Mark Recchi were denied of a potential juicy rebound when Brodeur lost his balance saving a wrister from the stick of Dennis Wideman despite a screen from Bergeron.

Each goaltender displayed subpar stickwork with about six and a half minutes remaining in the period. Shortly after Brodeur mishandled the puck in a way reminiscent of the 2003 Stanley Cup Finals, Tuukka Rask was nearly caught playing out the puck out of his net before taking out Dean McAmmond himself.

Read More: Bruins, Devils,

Miller on Thomas: ‘It’s unfortunate’

03.30.10 at 1:45 am ET
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Don’t for a second think that Ryan Miller wasn’t happy when Tim Kennedy’s flukey wrist shot floated and fluttered past Tim Thomas at 6:08 of the second period to put the Sabres up, 3-1 against the Bruins.

But that doesn’t mean Miller couldn’t have at least a little compassion for a fellow goalie, with whom he came within an eyelash of winning a gold medal against Team Canada in Vancouver.

Tim Thomas was the goalie to allow that Kennedy score and it was Thomas who had to listen to the boos of fans as he skated off the ice, past the Bruins bench and down the hallway to take out his frustration on the cement walls on either side with his goalie stick which was betraying him on this night.

“I think it is unfortunate,” Miller said of the boos Thomas received. “It has been a tough season and fans in this town are tough. It’€™s the same as it is in Buffalo. We have had some tough seasons and I have left the ice under duress a few times. It is part of being a goaltender. You are not always going to have things go your way. You have to hang with it and be a good teammate. I know Timmy is doing the right stuff. He is a battler and it is just not going the way he wants it to right now.”

It was the sixth time this season and the sixth time in 28 starts that Thomas has been replaced in the middle of a game, which is one of the loneliest feelings any athlete in any sport can experience.

“You don’€™t like to see it,” Miller added. “We are competitive to a certain degree. I know he is a little frustrated but I don’€™t know if there was a whole lot he could do on at least two of those goals. I think if you asked him about the second one he would want to control the rebound differently.”

The first goal Thomas allowed – by Tyler Myers – was through a heavy screen, and he didn’t see the puck until it changed direction through Dennis Wideman and went past him for the tying goal. The second goal was the result of a bad rebound that Wideman failed to clear, which was picked up by Paul Gaustad and backhanded past Thomas to give the Sabres the lead for good.

“Again I think that was Tyler making a hard shot cross body. Tyler has a hard shot; he’€™s a big kid. Knocking down one of his wrist shots is all about you can do.”

The last straw came at 6:08 of the second when Tim Kennedy collected a loose puck to the left of Thomas and flicked it toward the net. Thomas appeared to get fooled by the lack of strength behind the shot, overplayed it and allowed it to flutter past him for a 3-1 Sabres lead.

Read More: Bruins, NHL, Ryan Miller, Sabres
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