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Steve Montador out against Blackhawks this afternoon

03.07.09 at 12:24 pm ET
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Bruins defenseman Steve Montador is out for this afternoon’s matinee showdown against the Central Division’s second-place Chicago Blackhawks. Montador came down with the flu on Friday, and Shane Hnidy will jump back into action as the sixth defenseman.

Tim Thomas will again get the start in net for the Bruins.

Steve Montador doubtful for Saturday’s matinee

03.06.09 at 1:13 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — A spirited Bruins practice this morning with a good deal of skating and only one Bruins player missing: Steve Montador. The newly acquired defenseman was suffering from some flu-like symptoms and wasn’t able to make it to practice at Ristuccia Arena after traveling to Boston late Wednesday night to make it for Thursday’s morning skate prior to last night’s loss.

“Because he’s got that flu today and there’s the one o’clock game tomorrow (against the Blackhawks) I’d be very surprised if he’d be ready to go,” said B’s coach Claude Julien. “We’ve got some healthy guys. I don’t think there’s any reason to be a guy out there that isn’t 100 percent tomorrow. I’d put him as doubtful.”

In the first of the many competitions for ice time that Julien will have at his disposal with the depth provided by both Mark Recchi and Montador, Matt Hunwick and Blake Wheeler were splitting time on the left wing of David Krejci’s line — and there’s a possibility that Wheeler could be headed for a Saturday scratch in favor of the hustling, hump-busting Hunwick.

“We’ve looked at different scenarios and we’ll continue to expierament with that going forward,” said Julien. “Today we have Hunny, who we can use at forward and at defense, and we made lines of four for the last couple of lines. I think you’ll see (Hunwick) practicing at both position and we’ll use him at both positions as well.

“Certain players are struggling a little bit and somehow you have to create that competition from within,” added Julien. “I’m just hoping our team can play more like we did in the third period (Thursday) night. The fact that we’re struggling to win games and that every game seems to such a big challenge has taken away a bit from that energy and enthusiasm. If we can bring what we had (in the third period) for 60 minutes, then you’re going to start getting positive results and the emotion and everything else will start to come back.”

Hunwick impressed with his speed and physical intensity during his short stint at forward over the last week. Wheeler finished with 10:35 of ice time in last night’s loss, his lowest total of time on ice since he hit the bench in the second period against the Philadelphia Flyers back on Feb. 7.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, Claude Julien, Matt Hunwick, Steve Montador

Sounds of the game… Coyotes 2, Bruins 1

03.06.09 at 12:03 am ET
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Well, a home ice loss to the 14th-best team in the Western conference was not exactly what Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli and coach Claude Julien had in mind when the Bruins dealt for Mark Recchi and Steve Montador on Wednesday at the NHL trade deadline.

The Bruins came out and laid a massive egg against the overhauled roster of the Phoenix Coyotes and fell 2-1 at TD Banknorth Garden.

There are a number of reasons this loss is troubling. First, it comes on the heels of a 4-2 loss to Philadelphia on Tuesday night. Second it comes just a day after the team made two big deals for the stretch run. Third, the return of Milan Lucic to the lineup was expected to give the Bruins a little extra jump. That never materialized.

And finally, the New Jersey Devils are coming fast and this is another loss that brings the No. 2 seed a bit closer to being able to overtake the No. 1 Bruins, who are stuck on 93 points, just six ahead of Jersey.

It’s looking more and more like when the Bruins host the Devils on March 22 at the Garden, first place in the East could be on the line.

But before looking ahead, the Bruins must look back on what was a painful Thursday night on Causeway. And you could sense the frustration, starting with head coach Claude Julien.

Julien said his team, all of sudden, can’t finish on scoring chances.

Julien said when it comes to playing a full 60 minutes, talk is cheap.

Marc Savard said the Bruins were a little too cute on the ice with the puck.

Milan Lucic said the Bruins have to find a way to play 60 minutes.

Even as a newcomer, Steve Montador knows to expect boos when the team isn’t playing well.

Montador said the team is trying to look ahead and gain momentum.

Aaron Ward summed up the Bruins problems.

Phoenix coach Wayne Gretzky said his Coyotes put forth a good team effort.

Gretzky said his team had a good road effort in Boston.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Milan Lucic, Phoenix Coyotes, Steve Montador

Amid second-half slide, B’s searching for answers

03.05.09 at 11:37 pm ET
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Frustration appears to be bubbling over in the Bruins dressing room as the inconsistent performances stack upon each other, and those immediately chasing the Spoked B in the Eastern Conference standings keep gaining ground in disconcerting clumps.

Things hit a new low last night, as the Bruins clearly got back to their difficult-to-play-against ways but couldn’t muster up enough lunchpail offense in a 2-1 loss to the Phoenix Coyotes at the TD Banknorth Garden.

The straggling, struggling Black and Gold sit mired in a 3-6-2 slump over their last 11 games, and have degenerated into a mystified hockey team searching for answers amid a series of passionless periods, 80-foot fluke goals and bang-bang shots at open nets that inexplicably sail over the inviting crease.

The catalyst for the current 11-game slide back to the pack? Travel back to a Feb. 10 loss to the San Jose Sharks on their home ice where Jumbo Joe Thornton and Co. clearly turned on the jets in the third period and left the B’s scrambling for confidence after getting beaten down by the Western Conference powerhouse.

It was a national Versus game billed as a potential Stanley Cup Finals matchup between the Beast of the East and the Best of the West, and it ended with a stunning collapse from which the Bruins still haven’t fully recovered. Instead of a crowning moment punctuated by the triumphant Bruins leaving the arena with NHL bragging rights, Claude Julien’s boys have dropped into an undeniable rut that has some in the hockey world wondering whether this team was truly as good as its nearly letter-perfect first half.

Perhaps the overwhelming nature of that third period simply humbled a young, fearless puck bunch and splashed a bit of doubt into the minds of a group of brash young hockey players.

Boston has flashed glimpses of the dominant squad that simply slammed the hammer down on opponents during the first three months of the year, but it’s becoming apparent the San Jose defeat damaged the exposed psyche of a young, talented team attempting to make their first big statement.

Despite their current freefall, the Bruins have maintained the top spot in the East and have blowout wins over the Ducks and Panthers within the erratic stretch. But even Boston’s best players are starting to search for answers just out of their reach. The New Jersey Devils remain six points behind the B’s in the East, and they’ve won 8 of their last 10 and regained their Hall of Fame goaltender in the same breath.

Is it time to worry yet?

“What’s frustrating is that we know how we can play, and we can dominate when we’re at our best,” said center Marc Savard. “We didn’t put any pucks in the net and maybe we’re being a little too cute at times. We’ve got to try to nip this in the butt right now. We’ve got a big weekend ahead of us and we all know that. We’ve got to start pulling points out of games, and we all know that.

“It’s not for the lack of effort,” added Savard. “We’re trying. I know the fans come out all year. We heard the boos off the second, and we don’t want that. We want to go and show them what we can do, and want it to be a long run here. It was frustrating for us too.”

The Big, Bad hockey club put forth a grating, physical brand of hockey, outhitting the young Desert Dogs by a 31-10 margin during last night’s defeat, and Milan Lucic, Mark Recchi and Chuck Kobasew were all — at different times — camped out in the middle of the high-traffic zones attempting to redirect pucks, screen the goaltender and manufacture any kind of goal. There just wasn’t enough of it happening to make a difference.

It was exactly the kind of things that hockey purists preach to escape a rut, but nothing worked for a club that’s clearly squeezing the daylights out of their hockey sticks.

“I wish I had the magical answer for what’s going on, but it’s simple things right down to plain effort from every single player,” said blueliner Aaron Ward, who was part of an aggressive corps of defensemen that time and again pinched and crashed into the offensive zone without ultimately cashing in. “You’re out there and you hear the fans booing, and it’s justified right now to express displeasure for our performance. You watch video postgame and that’s simply not the way we need to be playing the game.

“I’m laughing, but it’s pretty (discouraging) to sit here and wonder what’s going on,” added Ward.

Several players talked afterward about “being too cute with the puck” and “not playing a full 60 minutes of hockey,” but they also appeared frustrated to hear boos cascading down to the ice from the 16,818 in attendance in the closing seconds of a flatter-than-flapjacks second period.

The worst part?

The B’s knew they deserved the Garden catcalls after seizing control of the game early on the strength of Chuck Kobasew’s goal, and then simply allowed things to slip out of their fingers later in the first — and then stumbled right on into an uninspired second period.

The B’s have become a shadow of their first-half selves as the postseason pressure cooker looms closer with every passing day, and the time has come to pack away the rookie walls, nagging injuries, and line chemistry questions into the excuse box in the Garden attic.

The time has come for the Bruins to regain the confident identity of the season’s first half and simply start willing themselves to goals and wins against whatever lines up across the ice from them. The time has come for the B’s to heal up the damage of month-old wounds and protect what they’ve worked so very hard for over the course of a long hockey season.

If they don’t — and fast — then things will get far worse than they were against the Coyotes on a random Thursday night in March.

“I just feel that talk is cheap,” said Julien. “The same thing with standing up front here and trying to explain to (the media). Talk is cheap right now. We have to go up there and then execute. I can stand here and give you all of the excuses. There shouldn’t be excuses. There’s got to be reasons to want to turn this thing around.”

Injury Ward: Milan Lucic came through with flying colors in his first game back from an “upper body injury” and was a physical presence with six crunching body blows against the Coyotes. Other than Looch, everyone else appeared to come through okay.

Player of the Game: Zdeno Chara. After the rare off-game on Tuesday night, Chara responded by playing with some snarl and absolutely beating down Coyotes all over the ice with punishing checks and intimidation tactics. A good rebound game for Big Z.

Goat Horns: Dennis Wideman. It was a bad night for Wideman, who turned a puck over in the D-zone during the Phoenix power play that quickly led to Scottie Upshall’s first Coyotes goal. The score deflated the team for a bit, and Wideman was on the ice for both of the Coyotes’ goals on the evening. Blake Wheeler has also continued to struggle in the final months, and was limited to little more than 10 minutes of ice time on a night when backchecking seemed optional among many of Boston’s forwards.

Turning Point: The Bruins basically crawled up and died for the next 30 minutes of play once Scottie Upshall banged home the Coyotes’ first goal — a power play score — off a bad Dennis Wideman turnoever. A hockey team simply can’t do that anymore in March and April.

Read More: Aaron Ward, Claude Julien, Dennis Wideman, Marc Savard

Bruins still trailing by a 2-1 score in third period

03.05.09 at 9:13 pm ET
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It’s been such an eventful third period that even the notorious TD Banknorth Garden “Dancing Man” — with his customary mustache and train conductor hat — was caught napping when the camera panned on him during the Romantics’ “What I like about you”. He finally got up and did a quick hand jive move after about 10 seconds staring off into space, but that’s a pretty good indicator of the energy Boston’s new look hockey club is giving off here in the third period.

3:05: Big flurry by Boston over the last few minutes with the Lucic/Savard/Kessel line reunited and putting some pressure on Bryzgalov and the Phoenix defense. The Coyotes goalie just smothered a loose puck in front — from a Lucic backhander — a second before Michael Ryder could pounce on it.

1:38: Great job by Shawn Thornton baiting rookie Viktor Tikhonov into an elbowing penalty in the waning minutes of the game. B’s will end the game on the power play, and have a great chance to tie it up.

The Coyotes lead the Bruins by a 2-1 score with 00:35.4 to go in the third period.

Reinprecht gives the Coyotes a lead in second period

03.05.09 at 8:15 pm ET
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12:08: Steve Reinprecht migrated to the front of the net in perfect receiving position for a Nigel Dawes dish from the sideboards, and ripped a quick shot up and over Tim Thomas to give the Coyotes a one-goal lead.

Seconds later Milan Lucic delivered a punishing hit to an unsuspecting Coyotes skater in their defensive zone. The Looch was moved back to a fourth line spot with Shawn Thornton and Stephane Yelle, and appears to be taking out some frustration on the ‘Yotes.

4:30: A series of solid saves by Thomas with Andrew Ference in the penalty box. Thomas made a quick reaction save on a Peter Mueller shot that was tipped in front of the net by Aaron Ward, and then Thomas hopped back into position to make stops on Steve Reinprecht and Nigel Dawes.

2:10: Milan Lucic just missed up and to the left of the net with a high redirect of a Patrice Bergeron wrist shot.

00:10: Clever little shot by Marc Savard from a carom off the back boards. Savard was at a bad angle, but threw the puck toward the bodies at the front of the net. The puck hit defenseman Kurt Sauer, but took a bad bounce away from the net rather than back toward the goal.

The Desert Dogs lead the Bruins by a 2-1 score after two full periods of play at the TD Banknorth Garden.

Kobasew and Upshall goals have B’s and Coyotes tied at 1-1

03.05.09 at 7:29 pm ET
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Chuck Kobasew put the Bruins up first with a slap shot from the high slot that — aided by a screaming P.J. Axelsson crashing the net — squeezed between Ilya Bryzgalov’s pads and trickled into the back of the net.

Minutes later Mark Recchi — skating on the top line with Marc Savard and Phil Kessel — camped out at his familiar spot by the post and redirected a Dennis Wideman shot that hit the crossbar and then deflected high up into the netting.

9:58: Zdeno Chara doled out the biggest hit of the net when he caught Coyotes forward Enver Lisin with his head down and crumpled the ‘Yotes winger into a heap. Several Phoenix forwards came after Chara following the hit, and Chara was called for interference.

7:59: Scottie Upshall can score against the Bruins — whether he’s a member of the Flyers or the Coyotes after getting traded yesterday. Joakim Lindstrom picked Dennis Wideman’s pocket behind the B’s net and fed Upshall for a backhanded bid that beat Tim Thomas for the power play score.

The B’s and Coyotes are tied 1-1 after one full period the TD Banknorth Garden.

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