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Alberts not worried about trades

10.07.08 at 10:25 pm ET
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"Hey Z...Don't let them send me to Altoona."

"Hey Z...Don't let them send me to Altoona."

Life hasn’t exactly been a bunch of icing-topped cupcakes for Andrew Alberts over the past month of his hockey life.

The 27-year-old defenseman got off a slow start after essentially getting tossed into a Bruins training camp that featured games within the first 72 hours of preseason’s actual kick-off, and he only just recently felt as if he was his normal hard-hitting, defensively-reliable self. Quarterbacking the power play or stealing the breath away from an arena crowd with his skating ability aren’t ever going to be in Alberts’ bag of puck tricks, but — as everyone’s favorite hoodie model/football coach is so fond of saying – he is what he is: a bruising 6-foot-4, 220-pound defenseman that’s at his best when he’s making the opposition think twice about going in the corners and utilizing his physical strength to steer players away from the front of the net.

McFilthy...

McFilthy...

It’s certainly true that Alberts hasn’t been quite the same since suffering a concussion at the hands of the McFilthy and McNasty Philadelphia Flyers mid-way through last season (for those unclear which dirty Scott Hartnell hit I’m talking about…here it is), but he truly felt like he’d begun to put things together last weekend.  Albie stepped up and unloaded a few shots, notched a few body hits and started feeling in the flow during a Saturday tune-up against the Islanders, but then he took a frustrating step back in Sunday’s preseason finale when he was a step behind the action, careless with the puck and finished with a -2 on the evening.

“It was a busy preseason with a lot of travel. Last year I got into a couple of

McNasty? Really?

McNasty? Really?

games at the end, but I wasn’t as prepared as I should have been,” said Alberts. “It took a while to get adjusted to thinking quickly on the ice and game situations, but it’s coming along. I thought I played my best game on Saturday [against the Islanders] but Sunday wasn’t very good.

“Obviously there’s so many good young guys here this year pushing for a spot, and it seems like it’s by far the most that we’ve had here in the three years that I’ve been here,” added Alberts. “Right now we have numbers and names being thrown around a lot. All you can do is come to the rink, do your work and not worry about things you can’t control. It’s up to the staff.”

The Bruins are roughly $250,000 under the salary cap with the 23 players currently earmarked to make the trip to the Pepsi Center in Colorado for the Oct. 9 season-opener, but Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli is surely looking to clear up more capital space under the cap. Alberts is a logical candidate to be moved because he’s in the last year of his rookie deal and his $1.25 million would give Chiarelli the kind of salary cap breathing room he covets. His name has been tossed around in trade talks with several teams, but none of these “hot stove” hockey rumors have gained much traction. Many of Alberts’ teammates lamented the annual tense, stress-filled uncertainty that accompanies the regular season roster deadline, but have made peace with that side of the hockey business.

“The toughest part about it as an athlete is remembering that there’s a facet of this job that’s all about economics,” said B’s blueliner Aaron Ward. “There’s so much that goes into making up a team. i think now moreso than ever players are uneasy about where they fit into a team. Your salary along with your personality and your skill has to fit into the team. No longer are you just simply good enough.”

Rosters must be “good enough” by 3 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon, so the answers for both Alberts, the Bruins and…well…the media will be forthcoming shortly. Alberts hopes to be in Boston when the ice chips clear, but he’s also well aware that the business of hockey could whisk him away to some other hockey city sooner rather than later. 

“You guys know more than I do,” said Alberts. “I try not to listen to the radio or look at papers, and I just come to the rink every day and do my job. I have friends texting me all the time asking if I’m going to Vancouver or going to Chicago, and telling what’s being said out there. I tell them I really don’t know anything.

“We’ll see what happens,” added Alberts. “There’s nothing you can really do. It’s part of the game.”

Read More: Aaron Ward, Andrew Alberts, Boston Bruins, Peter Chiarelli

Cut-down day for the Bruins

10.07.08 at 12:21 pm ET
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Would you like #18, Mr. Wheeler?

Would you like #18, Mr. Wheeler?

The days leading up to the regular season are always a difficult time mixed with happiness and melancholy in the world of an NHL team, and the past several weeks have been more so for the Black and Gold given their depth situation. The Bruins haven’t boasted a team this deep or talented since prior to the NHL lockout, and the new salary cap wrinkle with regard to rookie bonus money has complIcated matters.

The emergence of 22-year-old rookie Blake Wheeler made it imperative that Bruins General Manager Peter Chiarelli clear room for the $2.85 million cap hit that Wheeler’s contract carries due to the rookie bonus money built into his deal. With that move in mind, forward Peter Schaefer ($2.1 million), Jeremy Reich ($487,500) and Nate Thompson ($500K) were all placed on waivers and young blueliner Matt Hunwick ($750K) was assigned to the Providence Bruins. It’s hard to imagine Thompson and Reich clearing through waivers given their hockey value and the affordable price tags that go along with them.

Chiarelli dilligently attempted to jettison Schaefer during the last few weeks of training camp, but Schaefer’s salary combined with last season’s underperformance (9 goals, 17 assists and countless DNP-CD’s in 63 games after notching 50 points and 46 respectively over the previous two seasons with the Ottawa Senators) left the Bruins GM without much a market. Give credit to both Chiarelli for essentially admitting that the signing of Schaefer turned out to be a free agent mistake, and to owner Jeremy Jacobs for agreeing to potentially swallow the entirety of Schaefer’s $2.1 million deal should he go unclaimed. It was obvious to everyone that Claude Julien wanted Big Wheeler on his roster from jump street, and both Chiarelli and Jacobs made difficult, appropriate decisions to make it happen.

According to an excellent site on NHL Salary Caps called Hockey Buzz the Bruins are now only $242,501 under the $56.7 million salary cap for the 2008-09 season, so expect another move potentially involving Andrew Ference,P.J. Axelsson or Andrew Alberts. Both defenseman and Axe would draw interest around the league and each is being paid in excess of $1 million — a sum that would give Chiarelli the room he’s looking for under the cap. I spoke with Alberts about recently hearing his name in trade rumors with both Vancouver and Chicago, and I’ll have a little something up on the blog about that in two shakes of a hockey stick.

In the meantime, here’s some thoughts from Chiarelli earlier this afternoon while addressing the B’s media corps about the roster moves:

PC: So we’ve made some roster moves to get us down to 23 on our roster. We’ve released Peter Schaefer and he’s on waivers today, and he’ll be designated for reassignment pending whether he’s claimed or not. We’ve put Jeremy Reich on waivers, so we’ll see if he clears in another 24 hours. Nate Thompson and Matt Hunwick. Nate will go on waivers too for 24 hours too, and Matt is a pure assignment with no waivers.

Was that a difficult decision with Schaefer or was that something that was pretty cut-and-dried? PC: Yeah, it was difficult. I have had a history with him in Ottawa and I brought him in here, but it wasn’t working out. I know he’s a good player and these things happen. We talked yesterday and we had a good talk. He may end up in another NHL city or he may end up in Providence.

Was there a lot of dissapointment on his end when you talked to him? PC: He’s been around the league for a while and I think he knew what was coming especially given the play of Blake Wheeler. He pretty much expected it is what he told me. He was disappointed that it didn’t work out here.

Was there a lot of trade feelers put out there before it came to this? PC: Oh yeah. It’s tough now. What happens is right now you’re looking at the roster and generally you’re really happy about it because you see all these competitions where somebody wins and somebody loses. So it’s tough now moving guys. But that changes in a week to a month when teams start not playing well.

Would you be open to using him on re-entry or is that not an option? PC: That’s something that down the road we might look at, but right now no. I need all the cap space I can get.

Did he have any insight as to why things didn’t work out with him here? PC: Yeah, but that will remain private. If you catch up with him he may say it, but I’m not going to talk for him.

So with these moves how much room do you have under the salary cap? PC: We’re still pretty tight. This may not be our final roster. There may be one more move before we leave tomorrow, but we’ll see how the rest of the day plays out.

Can you give us any indication as to what that move might be? PC: Ummm no. Not yet.

From the standpoint of depth within the organization, can you be hurt if somehow they all get claimed? PC: It speaks to two things: One that we’ve had all these difficult decisions and in my years here we haven’t had those kinds of difficult decisions, so it means that we have depth. We have teams calling about these players. Organizationally we’re in a good spot. But if we lose these players then our depth gets tested. But we have had some good perfromances in camp by guys that we’ve already released and sent down that I’d be comfortable with in certain instances.

Speak to how the loss of the bonus cushion has affected your decision-making? PC: Well it certainly has, but those are the rules we’re playing with this year. It might have saved a job or two, but I look at it like you’ve got to ice the best team possible. That’s how I look at it.

Speaking of Blake, preseason is obviously a very short window but do you feel like he’s good enough to be with this team over the long haul? PC: We still may have one more move, but Blake has made the team. We’re going to take it slowly. I liken it to Looch a little bit last year, but he’s a couple of years older. I want him to continue working hard and continue practicing hard and see a progression. The level of play really picks up now, so we’ll see how he does.

Did going through the development of Lucic last year help you trust your judgement a little more with Wheeler this year? PC: A little bit, but there’s a three-year age difference and that’s big at this point. What it does speak to is the coaching staff and their ability to help develop these young guys.

Is Wheeler making the team more or a surprise than Lucic last year? PC: Don’t forget that Blake was the fifth pick overall during his draft year, so he comes with a pretty thick resume. I guess as a third party you woud look down at this and expect him to make it rather than Lucic, with all things being equal.

How do you see the goaltending heading into the season? PC: I’m happy where they’re at. They both had good camps. Our objective was to have a strong duo and I think that’s what we’re getting.

Do you think in this day and age that any NHL team needs two goaltenders to get through a season? PC: I think it certainly helps. You can see the wear and tear with a couple of goalies that played a ton of games and you could see it impacted their playoff performance. So it definitely helps.

Read More: Andrew Alberts, Blake Wheeler, Jeremy Reich, Matt Hunwick

Don’t mess with the Looch

10.02.08 at 10:02 am ET
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Milan Lucic left a lot of hockey carnage in his wake last season

Milan Lucic left a lot of hockey carnage in his wake last season

Milan Lucic quickly became a bone-shattering, haymaker-throwing fan favorite in his first season donning the Spoked B sweater as a 19-year-old rookie. But the puck pugilist left Boston last April hungry for greater  personal and team success before heading back to the welcoming embrace of the Great White North of Vancouver for a summer of relaxation and off-season off-ice workouts.

While the hulking 6-foot-4, 220-pounder heads into his second NHL season expected to again project a looming physical presence and act as a battering ram on skates also capable of dropping the gloves when the situation dictates, Lucic spent the summer working on diversifying his game. He’s already shown a pretty good, soft pair of hands for a big guy and enough offensive instincts to register as a threat with the puck.

 The big winger is hoping to reach somewhere in the neighborhood of 15-20 goals as his offensive puck game continues to mature and improve along with the rest of his Bruins teammates. There’s no identity crisis brewing with the 20-year-old big B’s lug, however. Looch fully understands that much of his on-ice demeanor should be like something out of the pages of an Incredible Hulk comic book: Lucic mad! Lucic Smash!

“I’ve got to stick to what I do best and that’s really straight-line hockey. There’s no reason to take the physicality out of my game at all because I’m more successful when I’m physical and creating momentum,” said Lucic, who finished second on the team with 89 penalty minutes last season. ”You’ve got to keep the [fighting] in your game because you want to be that physical presence on the ice and you want to have an impact on the game.”

But the young left winger also knows that he flashed glimmers of offensive skill while putting up 9 goals and 18 helpers in 77 games. More will be expected of him — along with a bevy of his fellow young Bruins teammates – in Bruins Season 2.0, and Lucic targeted a few specific areas of offseason improvement with that in mind. With more shifts skating alongside offensive-minded linemates and a large helping of PP time, the big man’s point totals should rise right along with his PIMs.

With all that swirling around in his mind, Lucic recognized that his initial burst of skating speed wasn’t up to NHL snuff and is an area that could and should be improved. Big Looch was perfectly fine once he got those pistons firing in his skating legs and was churning at maximum power, but he felt like the explosive first step was missing.

“You know more of what to expect [coming into this season], but because I’m a young guy I’m still learning. In that sense, I think speed-wise I could have a quicker first step,” said Lucic.  ”Once I get going then I’m there but I really felt that first step was something I needed to work on.

“I feel like it’s there, but we’ll see where I’m at when the games really start. Hopefully I keep getting the minutes that I was getting last year. You do a lot of plyometrics and quick-feet stuff with the ladder and also explosive sprinting. I was doing parachute-work as well and going 40-meter sprints, 30-meter sprints, 20-meter sprints, 50-meter sprints with the parachute and then you rip the parachute off.”

Where did Lucic get the idea to use parachutes and other track-and-field style techniques to make himself a better hockey player, you ask?

This guy could use the power of the Looch

This guy could use the power of the Looch

Enter Ian Gallagher, Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Vancouver Giants. Gallagher has worked with Lucic from the time he was barely old enough to drive, and both coach and player tailored his off-season workouts around track exercises designed to improve his explosion and fast-twitch muscles. It was an easy assignment for Gallagher, who works with a large group of hockey players in the summer and always looks forward to his time with the blue collar kid from Vancouver.

Part of Gallagher’s joy comes from the tireless work ethic that Lucic lugs to the table with him, and the other huge part is some of the amazing feats of strength that the physical specimen puts on in the weight room. The legend started when Lucic was playing Junior Hockey in Canada for the Giants and it continued on into his first season with the Bruins.

“He certainly did a lot of his power speed-work and he’s getting older now…so his game is coming along appropriately fast. The first step is all about power that allows you to go from a stationary position to full exertion very quickly. So plyometrics are a big staple of his program and power cleaning is a big staple of his program. Change of direction is big with a lot of diagonal sprints where they’re stopping and going quickly.

“There was steady growth for Milan over the summer. He’s got great genetics and he’s a very committed person. He came back very motivated and very willing to improve, and his scores improved over the summer as you expect somebody would that’s got the proper motivation. Nothing surprises me with Milan though because he’s got a real disposition for growth.”

So just how eye-popping are the genetics of the tall and strapping winger, who defied the odds to crack the Bruins NHL roster as a 19-year-old last season and truly created an impact in Boston’s comeback campaign last year?

“He’s got a great frame to put on muscle mass and handle it. He’s got great levers and he’s got a very strong core and a good musculature to him that allows to excel,” said Gallagher. “His leg mass is tremendous. His leg press is well over 900 pounds for eight reps and his power clean for reps is 275 pounds, which are both really football player-like numbers.

“Which is a little amazing because he’s got a very unassuming musculature to him. Because you look at his arms and there’s not a heck of a lot of mass to them, but his core is just so bloody powerful. His legs are massive and his trunk is massive, and when he gets those big muscles going it demonstrates itself in a powerful way when he collides with somebody or when he’s shooting the puck. I think it’s one of his biggest assets.”

Those assets haven’t worked up to full-speed yet this preseason, but it’s only a matter of time before the 20-year-old turns those physical attributes into points and PIMs for the B’s this season.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Ian Gallagher, Milan Lucic, Vancouver Giants

Bay’s Tale of the Whale

09.28.08 at 6:15 pm ET
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Here’s a little baseball/hockey cross-promotional nugget given the fact that I cover both Boston baseball and hockey in my little sports journalism world. Any time there’s a Canadian on the Red Sox roster, any idle conversation I have with them usually turns to pucks at some point — and Sox left fielder Jason Bay is no different. Bay is a native of Trail, British Columbia and I naturally assumed, before talking to him about the game on the frozen sheet, that he was likely a big Canucks fan and that maybe he was a charter member of the Cam Neely Fan Club. Natural for a guy from B.C., ne-c’est, pas?

Play some Brass Bonanza...or else!

Play some Brass Bonanza...or else!

While Bay admitted his dad, David, was a Big Boston Bruins fan going back to the days of Bobby Orr and that fascination continued through the days of Neely and Ray Bourque, Jason proudly trumpeted the Hartford Whalers as his favorite team. That’s right: the Whale. Former Whalers forward Ray Ferraro is also a native of Trail, a fishing town of about 8,000 people, and all the kids in the town grew up idolizing Ferraro and therefore followed the travails of the Whale. Bay was 12 years-old when Ferraro finally shed the Green, Blue and White Whalers sweater in a trade for New York Islanders D-man Doug Crossman midway through the 1990-91 season after six plus seasons proudly donning the Whale-Tail.

“Trail is a pretty small place and Ray was having some of his big years with Hartford when I was growing up, so just about everybody in my hometown was a Whalers fan,” said Bay, who is also lifelong friends with Edmonton Oilers center Shawn Horcoff. “What is that song they play at the games…Brass Bonanza? Yeah, I got a kick out of that the first time I heard them playing it at Fenway Park.”

Bay never made it cross-country to the Hartford Civic Center for a game before the Whale morphed into a Hurricane, but he is hoping to get to a Bruins game at some point this season before returning home to Canada for the off-season. So if you happen to see a random Ray Ferraro Whalers sweater at a B’s game this winter, look a little more closely to see if it’s British Columbia’s best baseball player.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Boston Red Sox, Cam Neely, Doug Crossman

Some Saturday postgame thoughts

09.27.08 at 5:31 pm ET
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A few hockey thoughts after watching the Bruins fall by a 4-3 score to the Washington Capitals in their first home game of the hockey exhibition season:

*Blake Wheeler is the real hockey deal and there doesn’t seem to be any way to keep the 22-year-old

Could Wheeler be this preseason's Milan Lucic?

Could Wheeler be this preseason's Milan Lucic?

Minnesota native off the B’s roster this season. The 6-foot-5, 208-pound beast showed tenacity and an instinctual nose for the puck in the areas around the paint, and also flashed a very good set of hands while faking out defenders and popping in his first goal of the preseason. The best part of the goal was watching Caps defenseman Karl Alzner hanging off the mighty forward like a piece of carry-on luggage as he banged home the rebound.  Wheeler and Bergeron displayed pretty good early chemistry in their very first game skating together, and the rookie is quickly becoming the rising star of this camp. A fellow hockey hack thought he saw a little Tomas Holmstrom in him, but when I look at him and watch him play…I must admit I see a lot of Mike Knuble, possibly my favorite Bruins player during my time covering the team. “It doesn’t seem like he’s young,” said Bergeron after the game. “He seems like a veteran out there. I’m very impressed with the way he’s playing.”

*Veteran pick-up Stephane Yelle showed many of the “little hockey skills” that he’ll be offering the Bruins this season, provided he makes the final roster. Yelle screened Jose Theodore on Boston’s first goal of the game — an Andrew Ference strike from the point, won 8 out of his 12 faceoffs after starting out with five straight wins in the circle, and set up a bevy of prime scoring chances down the stretch. Saturday afternoon was a big game for the 34-year-old and the Yelle/Sobotka/Nokelainen line began taking on the makings of a formidable energy line over the course of the season.

Umm dad...you never said anything about the minors.

Umm dad...you never said anything about the minors.

*You can’t take the Boston out of the Boy with Chris Bourque. In his last game at the TD Banknorth Garden he won a Beanpot Championship for BU with an OT goal during his one-and-only season in the Scarlet and White, and he did it again on Saturday afternoon with a forceful wrist shot from the high slot with less than three minutes to play. It was a proud moment for the 22-year-old with daddy Ray in the crowd of 13,000 plus (not sure how many were actually disguised as yellow seats, but such is life). ”It’s kind of like going back to the glory days. It doesn’t even seem real right now,” said Bourque. ”This is basically where I learned how to skate, here and in the other building. This is my first game in Boston being in the NHL. It’s just a little weird, but it’s pretty exciting.”

 Bourque had a tiny cup of coffee with the Capitals last season, but is pushing to stick with Washington in his pivotal fourth pro season. “I view it as a big year. I feel that I am ready for the next step. That’s what I’m trying to prove right now in training camp,” said the younger Bourque.

The Bruins will now take off for Vermont for three days of practice and team-building exercises in Stowe, but I’ll be hoping to keep you busy with some bloggerific stuff over the next few days. Have a good Saturday night and we’ll check in tomorrow while I’m double-dipping at Fenway Park.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, Chris Bourque, Mike Knuble, Patrice Bergeron

A few minutes with the Captain

09.27.08 at 11:10 am ET
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Z says 'I must break you!'

Z says 'I must break you!'

 Towering Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara held a State of the Chara Address with the media following Saturday’s morning skate, and talked about — among other things — the status of his surgically repaired left shoulder and his impending return to the lineup. Chara hopes to play in one of the remaining four preseason games on Boston’s schedule.

Chara is aiming to be back on the ice when the Bruins open the season in Colorado on Oct. 9, but only time will tell with Big Z. Here’s a few of the 6-foot-9 blueliner’s thoughts from this morning:

How are things shaping up for you in camp and how is your shoulder feeling? ZC:I’m feeling better. Every day is better. We’re making progress and it looks good right now. Obviously today was not a good day, but if I’m not keeping up the pace that I’m at right now things should be pretty good. I’m not putting any timelines, but it’s getting better every day.

Where do you see the most progress? ZC: In the strengthening. That’s one thing where you see the most because you are working most of the time to get the range of motion back, and once you get that then you have to make sure you’re getting your strength back. Obviously the timing on the ice, you can’t really jump one right in front of the other and you have to follow the steps of the rehab. Obviously it doesn’t make sense to lift the weights before you have the range of motion, so slowly it’s getting better.

Do you see yourself getting into a game before the preseason starts? ZC: That’s what I’m shooting for. I really want to play before the regular season and we’re going to have to make that decision when it comes to that time. I can’t really make decisions or promises right now, but I would like to get at least one game in.

What does one game do for you? ZC: Obviously it’s not much, but it’s better than none of the games. You’d like to get a little bit of that camp tempo and timing, and being around the guys and trying different situations. Obviously getting to the system that we’ll be playing. It doesn’t do a whole lot, but it’s better than nothing. It’s timing. Having the puck in a game-speed and tempo and reacting with split-second decisions that you don’t have on the ice when you’re practicing.

It must help to already know the system, though? ZC:Yeah, but still if you’re not playing in hockey games for a long period of time then you need some time in games to feel it and everybody kind of feel comfortable with each other when you’re playing.

Coach Julien said that last year was really about learning the system and this year might be more about the D joining the rush and stepping up in certain places. ZC:Yeah, you can see that the hockey is improving so much that you’re always trying to add another aspect to your system. I think that one of the things that we need to add or improve is to have defenseman more involved in supporting the attack while at the same time being in a good position defensively. But you’re right in that last year we were kind of buying into the system and now everyone should know where we’re playing last year and tweak a little bit here and there while we’re getting used to each other. That’s what training camp is here for: to build on what we were doing last year and then follow that step.

If you don’t play in any preseason games would that preclude you from playing in that first game against Colorado? ZC: I’m not going that far ahead. Like I said I want to play and we’ll see.

Claude [Julien] and Peter [Chiarelli] both said that you had tried to do too much in your first year here, so you go into your second year trying to do a little less and you have great success. Do you guy into this year thinking that you’re going to build off that? ZC: You can’t really push and put pressure on yourself that you need to do more or prove something else, you just have to be on the ice and play well defensively, play hard and be hard to play against, be physical and be involved in the game and really react on the ice. You really need to just follow your instincts and really can’t think too much about other things. You just really just to have to go out the ice, play, enjoy it and react to things that are happening.

Difficult for you to watch instead of playing, even if it’s just preseason? ZC:Well, yeah. You want to play and it’s preperation for the season. It’s always frustrating when you’re not with the guys in the locker room right before the game and you’re not on the ice. You would like to play and it’s a little harder…but I also know that it’s not the most important time of the year. It’s just the preseason and the regular season is when things start to count.

Michael Ryder said that part of the attraction of him coming here was that he wouldn’t have you clobbering him six or eight times a year. Did he say anything to you about that? ZC: No, but it’s part of my game obviously to be physical and be involved and effective on the season. I was glad when Michael came to our team. I think there is a lot of potential and he is a great goal-scorer. I’m sure

Could you please tell Z to stop hitting me?

Could you please tell Z to stop hitting me?

he’s going to be working hard and he’s going to be a great addition to our team. We need a player like that, and I’m sure Claude knows him as well as anybody after having him in juniors and in Montreal. He knows him really well and knows what he’s capable of.

When you look at guys coming down like him coming down, or anybody, what’s more difficult for you: a guy with size and strength or a guy with speed and shiftiness? ZC: It’s hard to pick. You can’t underestimate anybody. You know with a smaller guy that he could be shifty, but you also know that a bigger guy can make a move too. The game has improved so much that even bigger guys can make moves and be really skilled. Michael, I think his strength is really when he’s in the high slot because he’s got a quick release. He’s been really effective in that area on top of the circles and in the slot, and he can find openings and put the puck in the net.

Read More: Claude Julien, Michael Ryder, Peter Chiarelli, Zdeno Chara

A Canadian man and his stick

09.26.08 at 3:18 pm ET
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Let’s drop the puck on this Bruins blog, which will become “Pucks with Haggs” in the very near future, with one of my favorite B’s-related moments from last winter. I have the NHL Home Ice Package and religiously watch TSN’s Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday, and always look forward to the dapper Don Cherry’s Coach’s Corner in between periods.

Casual Friday at the rink for Dandy Don

Casual Friday at the rink for Dandy Don

With that as the preface, the best Bruins rant from ”Grapes” came late in the season with the Black and Gold pressing for a playoff berth. Cherry caught a juicy bit of footage of center Marc Savard on the Bruins bench seemingly talking to his stick and patting the head of the stick like a pet schnauzer. Hockey players are obviously very in tune with their tools of the trade, but Cherry seems to be intimating that Savard was professing deep love to his hockey stick while waiting for his next shift.

I asked Savvy about this before the team departed for Halifax and here’s what he had to say: “I don’t really talk to my stick. It’s just been a habit my whole life because I really love my sticks. I do love my sticks, though, but I’m not telling them that I love them. I’m always checking my sticks and making sure they’re not broken and there’s no snow in the blade…or just taking care of it. I’m always taking care of her and making sure she’s ready to go. Maybe I was talking to Muzz [Glen Murray] beside me as I was fooling around with it. I didn’t really see it, but a bunch of my buddies that always watch Hockey Night in Canada told me about it [at this point defenseman Dennis Wideman chimes in from the next locker over and says that Savard taped the show and watches it all the time]…so I autographed a stick and sent it to him after the season was over. I signed it: To Don, take care of it for me.”

Was Savard really whispering sweet hockey nothings to his stick, or was he talking to Murray sitting next to him on the bench? You be the judge, and let me know what you think at jhaggerty@weei.com

Read More: Dennis Wideman, Don Cherry, Glen Murray, Hockey Night in Canada
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