Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network

Jeremy Jacobs has no intention of selling Bruins to buy NFL’s Buffalo Bills: ‘I kind of like where I am’

05.20.14 at 2:14 pm ET
By   |   Comments
Jeremy Jacobs said Tuesday he has no plans to sell the Bruins to buy the Buffalo Bills. (AP)

Jeremy Jacobs said Tuesday he has no plans to sell the Bruins to buy the Buffalo Bills. (AP)

When Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs expressed interest in buying the Buffalo Bills in April, after the passing of longtime owner Ralph Wilson, Bruins fans wondered if that meant the end of his stewardship of the NHL franchise.

Tuesday, during a 25-minute address to reporters at TD Garden, Jacobs made it clear that he has no such intentions and is quite happy as the owner of the “Original Six” franchise.

“Well, I can’€™t buy the Bills, because I own the Bruins,” Jacobs said, referring to the NFL by-laws that prohibit owning teams in different cities. “That’€™s not a bad place to be. I kind of like where I am.”

Jacobs is among the wealthiest and most successful businessmen in the world, owning the Delaware North Companies, with an individual net worth of approximately $3.1 billion. Jacobs was initially among a group of several Western New York businessmen reported to be interested in the Bills. Another businessman reportedly interested was real estate tycoon Donald Trump.

Jacobs has owned the Bruins since 1975. Jacobs also represents the club on the NHL‘s Board of Governors and serves on its Executive Committee. At the NHL Board of Governors meeting in June 2007, Jacobs was elected Chairman of the Board, replacing the Calgary Flames‘ Harley Hotchkiss.

Jacobs made changes in management of the Bruins, with the retirement of veteran team president Harry Sinden from active management of the team into an advisory capacity. New management included Peter Chiarelli and head coach Claude Julien. Cam Neely, who was on the dais Tuesday with Jacobs and Jacobs’ son Charlie, was also lured back to the new organization and subsequently named as President of the team.

Since 2008, the Bruins have made playoffs every year, winning the Stanley Cup in 2011, reaching the Cup finals in 2013 and winning the Presidents’ Trophy this past season as the team with the best record and most points (117).

Read More: Boston Bruins, Buffalo Bills, Cam Neely, Charlie Jacobs

Report: Canucks to hire Jim Benning as general manager

05.20.14 at 2:12 pm ET
By   |   Comments

According to TSN’s Darren Dreger, the Canucks will hire Bruins assistant general manager Jim Benning as their new GM this week.

Benning has been an assistant GM under Peter Chiarelli since 2006, and it became evident he wasn’t long for Boston this season when he was interviewed for the Sabres general manager job this season. Though he missed out on the Buffalo job, he was long believed to be the front-runner in Vancouver once Trevor Linden was named Canucks team president. Dreger’s report suggests that Benning could try to hire former Predators coach Barry Trotz to replace the recently fired John Tortorella.

Bruins president Cam Neely said Tuesday that a potential loss of Benning is the cost of being successful.

“We have given permission for Jim to talk. He has talked to a couple different teams,” Neely said. “That’€™s what happens when you have success. Teams look at other organizations that have success and start inquiring about your management group. It’€™s something that a lot of good organizations have had to deal with over time and we are dealing with that right now.”

Said Jeremy Jacobs: “I think that it speaks to what’€™s now become sort of the Boston model. People do want to copy what you’€™re doing because of the success we have seen and we didn’€™t win this year, and got to the Finals the year before and all. These are enviable positions to be in. I love being here after a season like we just had. Disappointment in the playoffs and our objective is the Cup, it isn’€™t necessarily to have the best team during the regular season as it is to win the Stanley Cup. We will continue that objective and I think we will continue to grow from here.”

Benning will still have a connection to the Bruins, as his nephew, Matt Benning, was a sixth-round pick of the team in 2012. Matt Benning is currently a defenseman at Northeastern University.

Read More: Jim Benning, Matt Benning,

Brad Marchand knows he’s underperformed, hopes Bruins don’t trade him

05.17.14 at 3:30 pm ET
By   |   Comments
Brad Marchand's future in Boston is no sure thing. (AP Photo)

Brad Marchand‘s future in Boston is no sure thing. (AP Photo)

When teams win, every player is appreciated in some way, shape or form. Even Tomas Kaberle ended up positively impacting Boston’s Stanley Cup run with a big assist on Michael Ryder‘s first goal of Game 4 against the Canadiens, and when the Cup was raised, all was forgiven.

When teams lose, it’s a different animal, and underperforming players might have reason to worry about their future.

Of the Bruins’ biggest names under contract, Brad Marchand might be most likely to hear his name pop up in trade chatter. He’s relatively young (26) and on a pretty good contract (three more years with a $4.5 million cap hit in each), but after an up-and-down regular season and a goose-egg in the goal column for the entire postseason, his future with the Bruins is no sure thing. If there is a bigger move for Peter Chiarelli to make, Marchand would be a logical candidate to be moved.

This isn’t the first time Marchand’s had to wonder about whether his time with the B’s was coming to an end. When Tyler Seguin was traded last summer, Marchand wondered if he might be on the move too. On Friday, he reiterated that point and said he hopes to stay in Boston.

“A guy as talented as Segs gets traded at such an early age and it’s an eye-opener for everyone,” Marchand said. “I don’t know. Hopefully I’m not going anywhere, but that’s up to management and the coaching staff. I guess we’ll see.”

Though Marchand is viewed universally as a pest, he’s one of Boston’s best players when at the top of his game. A plus two-way player, Marchand is fast, has underrated hands and kills penalties.

Yet when factoring in Marchand’s quiet end to the last postseason, the pesky forward has now gone 20 playoff games without a goal. That’s not good enough for a player who should be expected to score 25 to 30 goals a season (he scored 25 this season after recovering from a dreadful start that saw him score just three goals in the first 25 games of the season).

“It’s very tough,” Marchand said of his postseason shortcomings. “You really want to perform and help the team. Playoff time is when you need to be big and you need to produce. I wasn’t able to accomplish that this year. I’ll have to focus even harder for next year.”

Marchand was the victim of a horrendous call in Game 7 of the second round of the Canadiens, as he was called for goaltender interference when Andrei Markov cross-checked him in the head, sending him into Carey Price.

As frustrating as that “reputation call” may have been, Marchand — admittedly, to his credit — has earned the reputation to get those bad calls. Reputation calls aren’t given to players who take a lot of penalties; they’re given to players who get away with a lot of stuff that refs don’t always see, such as his punch to the head of Tomas Plekanec before a faceoff that went uncalled.

“It’€™s frustrating, but I dug that hole for myself and I’€™ve got to live with it,” Marchand said after Game 7.

If the Bruins were to move Marchand, it would be interesting to see what kind of return he would yield. After being eliminated by the speedier Canadiens and assuming they’ll have to face them at some point most years in the playoffs with the new playoff format, Boston should be in no hurry to remove more speed from its top two lines.

Still, depending on what the B’s could get back and whether it could save them some money against the cap (re-signing Jarome Iginla to anything but a one-year, bonus-laden deal seems to be their only bet at retaining Iginla unless they shed salary), anything might be worth exploring for Chiarelli.

Read More: Brad Marchand,

Peter Chiarelli unsure Bruins will retain Shawn Thornton

05.16.14 at 6:45 pm ET
By   |   Comments

 

Shawn Thornton‘s future with the Bruins is murky at best, as he was not told that he wouldn’t be re-signed Friday, but Peter Chiarelli did not tell him the team plans to retain him.

Thornton, a free agent, wants to play another two years. His preference is to play in Boston, so the sense is that if the Bruins will have him back, he’ll return. If they don’t want him, he won’t. Chiarelli told Thornton that he needs to look at some things before he decides whether the team will make him an offer.

“Thorty I thought had a kind of up and down year,” Chiarelli said. “He got, obviously, the incident with Pittsburgh and you know, there’€™s trends in hockey and the fisticuffs trend — again, this doesn’€™t characterize Thorty as just a fighter because he contributed on that [fourth] line.

“That line has had a lot of success in the past, but there is definitely, we’€™re trending away from that style. I had a discussion with Thorty this morning and I said, ‘€˜Look, give me a couple weeks to digest what’€™s happened and then we’€™ll go from there.’ That same comment applies to [Jarome Iginla]. I haven’€™t talked to the other [unrestricted free agents] yet but to Iggy and Thorny so far.”

Iginla is a free agent as well. He played this season on a one-year deal in which the Bruins were able to pay him bonuses that will go against next year’s cap in order to save money on this year’s cap. The team can keep doing that on Iginla, but only on one-year deals.

Iginla, who tied for the team lead with 30 goals in the regular season and led the team with five postseason goals, said he does not wish to negotiate publicly, so he was generally tight-lipped about what he wants. He did say that at age 36, he still feels he can play a while longer.

“I still want to play for a while before I quit. I’ll push myself to be better and there are no issues,” he said. “I loved playing here with the guys and there’s a great chance for next year for the Stanley Cup. They keep getting better with the young guys that they have, Dougie [Hamilton] and [Matt Bartkowski]. The core is still young. There’s lots of reasons. Very fortunate if I can be back here.”

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Jarome Iginla, Peter Chiarelli, Shawn Thornton,

Milan Lucic on handshake threats: ‘I’m not sorry that I did it’

05.16.14 at 5:27 pm ET
By   |   Comments

Bruins forward Milan Lucic said at Friday’s breakup day that he does not regret what he did in the handshake line following Game 7 of the second round, when he allegedly told Canadiens players that he was going to kill them.

Canadiens forward Dale Weise told reporters about the incident after the game, which drew criticism from Lucic both after the game and again on Friday.

“What’s said on the ice, stays on the ice and fortunately that code is broken and it’s unfortunate that it blows up to what it is now,” Lucic said Friday. “I’m not the first guy to do it, I’m not the last guy to do [it]. I’m not sorry that I did it. I’m a guy that plays on emotion and this is a game of emotions. Sometimes you make decisions out of emotions that may not be the best ones. That’s what it is. I didn’t make the NHL because I accepted losing and accepted failure. I think that’s what’s got me to this point and made me the player that I am. Other than that, there’s not that much to it. I’m not the first guy to do it and I’m sure I won’t be the last.”

Lucic was asked for clarification as to whether he wasn’t sorry.

“I can’t take back what I said,” he said. “I’m not apologizing for what was said in the handshake and, like I said, it’s just unfortunate that what was said on the ice gets leaked out and gets blown way out of proportion.”

Read More: Milan Lucic,

Bruins injury roundup: Matt Fraser played on broken foot

05.16.14 at 1:30 pm ET
By   |   Comments
Matt Fraser

Matt Fraser

As is customary on breakup day, word emerged on injuries the Bruins dealt with during the postseason. The bravest of the bunch proved to be Matt Fraser, who played the entire postseason with a broken foot.

Fraser, who was sporting a cast and crutches Friday, broke his right foot in Game 1 of the first round of the AHL postseason while playing for the Providence Bruins. He was dealing with the injury when he was called up in the second round by the Bruins and he scored the overtime winner in Game 4 of the second round for Boston.

Chris Kelly, who suffered a back injury late in the season, had a herniated disc and said it was the most pain he had ever dealt with. Kelly said he hoped he could have returned in some point in the playoffs but wasn’t sure. Kelly will undergo surgery at some point.

Milan Lucic was sporting a soft cast on his left wrist after suffering an injury in Game 7 of the second round against Montreal. He was set to receive an MRI on Friday.

Regarding Zdeno Chara‘s fractured finger, the Bruins captain said that he might not need surgery.

As for Dennis Seidenberg, the defenseman said his plan all along was to return this season after tearing his ACL and MCL on Dec. 27 and having surgery in early January. Seidenberg said he would have been able to play in the Eastern Conference finals had the team gotten there.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Chris Kelly, Dennis Seidenberg, Matt Fraser, Milan Lucic

Pierre McGuire on M&M: Bruins’ bad start ‘carried over to most of the rest of the game’

05.16.14 at 12:49 pm ET
By   |   Comments

NBC Sports analyst Pierre McGuire joined Mut & Merloni on Friday to break down the Bruins’ 3-1 season-ending loss to the Canadiens in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

The Bruins found themselves in trouble from the start in Game 7, after noticeably poor execution led to a quick Dale Weise goal to give the Habs a lead they wouldn’t relinquish.

“It started with a bad turnover by Matt Bartkowski, we showed it on television. That puck has to be in deep,” McGuire said. “I know it’€™s a simplification and people are probably saying, ‘What does that have to do with it?’ It had a lot to do with it, because you had all your forwards expecting to shoot it, and they don’€™t get back in time. Montreal makes a really smart move and Brandon Prust wins a footrace and gets it to Danny Briere, who eventually gets it to Weise, because Bartkowski’€™s looking at the puck.”

McGuire told Mut & Merloni on Wednesday that Game 7′s first goal would be significant, and he was proven right by the outcome of the game.

“I told you guys the other day the first goal was going to matter. The Bruins were never able to get it back on the rails,” he said. “Now, give Carey Price some credit, and the Bruins also didn’t have a lot of puck luck, but that was a bad start and it carried over to most of the rest of the game.”

McGuire said he could tell from his spot between the benches that the Bruins seemed deflated by the early goal.

“The coaches were pretty vocal, but not a negative way, a positive way, and Shawn Thornton was extremely vocal,” he said. “Outside of that it was a pretty quiet bench.”  Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Bruins, Canadiens, Pierre McGuire,
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines