Archive for July, 2011

Claude Julien optimistic about Joe Corvo’s impact with Bruins

Monday, July 11th, 2011

WILMINGTON — Bruins coach Claude Julien discussed the Bruins’ offseason moves and their prospects on the final day of development camp Monday. The B’s lost Michael Ryder and Tomas Kaberle to free agency, replacing them with Montreal’s Benoit Pouliot and Carolina’s Joe Corvo.

In the case of Kaberle and Corvo, Julien said the 34-year-old Corvo can help the power play, much like Kaberle was expected to when the B’s sent a package of commodities (a 2011 first-round pick, a 2012 second-rounder and center Joe Colborne) to Toronto or the defenseman.

“It’€™s not about replacing [Kaberle] but taking on his role,” Julien said of Corvo. “I think you look at Corvo, who’€™s got a really good shot. He’€™s a player that may be a little bit more physical and more engaged. We’€™re going to have to work with him as far as making him understand the way we play here. And I think the way we play will certainly help him a little bit, because we don’€™t want him running around. We want him playing well positionally.

“Again, he skates well and he’€™ll move the puck well. That’€™s where Kaberle ‘€¦ people that thought he underachieved a little bit. I think at the beginning we weren’€™t quite getting what we wanted. But once you saw him get a little comfortable, we’€™ve got to give him credit. He’€™s a smart player, he sees the ice well, makes good plays and that’€™s where his strength is. When you look at Corvo, his shot is going to be a lot better and hopefully on the power play which we did [get] some good shots from the back end, it will certainly help us.”

Corvo, for whom the Bruins traded a fourth-round pick, had 11 goals and 29 assists for 40 points last season. Kaberle had four goals and 43 assists for 47 assists with the Maple Leafs and Bruins in the regular season. He signed a three-year, $12.75 million deal with Carolina last week.

One last skate and scrimmage for B’s prospects

Monday, July 11th, 2011

WILMINGTON — The final day of Bruins’ development camp kicked off Monday morning with a final power skating session conducted by instructor Besa Tsintsadze. The session featured plenty of interesting drills, including one in which players had to position their sticks upright, spin around, and grab a hold of their sticks before they could move.

A scrimmage followed, with plenty of special teams work sprinkled in. Coach Claude Julien once again took to Ristuccia Arena to watch the prospects, and he had a rare offseason with the media. Check back for more from Julien and the B’s youngsters.

Babies in Black take scrimmage

Sunday, July 10th, 2011

WILMINGTON — With Bruins coach Claude Julien looking on from the stands, the organization’s youngsters followed their Sunday morning practice with a scrimmage. While a shootout and special teams work were mixed in, the black squad bested the white group by a 3-1 margin.

Forward Justin Florek factored into all three black goals, scoring two and assisting a Brian Ferlin strike. Third-round tough guy Anthony Camara scored the white squad’s only goal. The Bruins’ sixth-round goalies each allowed two goals, with 2010 sixth-round pick Zane Gothberg allowing a goal for each team and this year’s sixth-rounder Lars Volden allowing two goals.

Lars Volden recalls the save that brought him YouTube fame

Friday, July 8th, 2011

WILMINGTON — The Bruins may have two of the best goalies in the NHL, and now they have the man responsible for one of the most impressive (if not luckiest) saves you’ll ever see.

A simple YouTube search of “Lars Volden” will yield a video of the Noreweigen goalie absolutely robbing a Valerenga forward in 2009 while playing for the Stavenger Oilers of GET-Ligaen. Though the puck bounced off Volden’s right pad and through his legs, he hooked his foot back at the goal line to keep the puck out.

“It was a one-timer, it hit inside my [pad], and it bounced back,” Volden recalled. “I just felt something weird between my legs. I just turned around and kicked it out.

“It looks good, but it was a pretty lucky save, I think,” he added with a laugh.

Of course, the Bruins have set the bar high when it comes to making big saves. Tim Thomas‘ save on Steve Downie in the third period of Game 5 of the Eastern Conference finals was arguably the best save any NHL goaltender in this season. Volden tried to watch the Stanley Cup playoffs as much as he could before eventually being drafted by the champions.

“I followed it a little bit, but it’s so late with the time difference. When I got drafted, I didn’t have any words to say. I was so happy, and now I’m so proud to be a part of this organization. I’m really happy about it.”

While Volden is clearly thrilled to be with the Bruins, he may need to edit his list of favorite goalies. Roberto Luongo and Carey Price were the ones he said he enjoyed watching when asked Friday.

Zane Gothberg can’t mask his excitement

Friday, July 8th, 2011

WILMINGTON — In case you’re having trouble spotting Bruins goaltending prospect Zane Gothberg at Ristuccia Arena, it shouldn’t be hard. While Michael Hutchinson rocks a Bruins-themed mask, and Lars Volden looks like a souvenir from the Rolling Rock brewery’s gift shop, the colorful Gothberg wears a mask that that is uncharacteristically plain. Blank white, no design.

“This year, our team [the USHL's Fargo Force], we don’t fund really for custom goalie helmets,” Gothberg explained at the Bruins’ development camp. “I didn’t know if it would be a one or two-year span where I’d be playing for my team that I’m with now.

Now, he does know where he’ll be playing, and that means another year in the USHL. Recruited to play at the University of North Dakota, Gothberg, who graduated high school a year ago, needed to wait and see what UND’s goalie situation would be before he knew which year he would head to college. With starter Brad Eidsness headed back for his senior year rather than turning pro, Gothberg will wait until the fall of 2012 before finally playing college hockey.

“Both Brad Eidsness and [junior] Aaron Dell are superb goalie. Eisness is sticking around for his senior year, and Dell will be around for his junior year, so it is what it is, and you’ve just got to make the best out of the situation,” the 18-year-old said.

While waiting extra long for college may be tough, Gothberg doesn’t seem to have any complaints, but for the happy-go-lucky netminder, it complaining wouldn’t appear to be his bag.

He was the backup for the Force last year, with Colorado native Ryan Massa getting the majority of the starts between the pipes. Gothberg played 23 games, posting a 2.23 goals against average and a .908 save percentage. Next year, Massa will be gone, and it will be Gothberg’s show.

“It’s a little bit of a different plan,” Gothberg said of going back to the USHL, “but at the same time, I think it would be good for me to see a lot of rubber this upcoming year and be able to carry that momentum into the college level.”

It also gives Gothberg another year of experience after a debut season in the USHL in which he admitted there were adjustments. While he’s now made the leap from high school to a new league, he had to learn how to adjust along the way.

“It was a bit of a change,” Gothberg said. “Just the schedule away from the rink, there was a lot of down time for me, just because I had graduated high school. I had to make the most of my time, whether it was doing yoga or just working out and stuff, just being around the guys and stuff or just hanging out at the rink all day. It was a different change of pace, and on the ice too, it took me a couple of games, I’d say after my fifth start, to get kind of a groove and be able to play at that level consistently and on a daily basis.”

Gothberg is in his second development camp with the Bruins, as he attended last year’s as a sixth-round pick in the 2010 draft. Given that he has yet to even attend college, he figures to be at quite a few more. Being Bruins property for a long time shouldn’t be tough on Gothberg, as the organization gives him plenty of netminders to look up to. Like everyone else, he watched Tim Thomas‘ Vezina/Stanley Cup/Conn Smythe Trophy in amazement.

“Obviously everyone knows about Timmy,” Gothberg said. “It was pretty ridiculous. He’s a great, great goaltender. It’s such a weird style that he plays, but at the same time, he is fundamentally sound. He does battle his butt off, and he does make a lot of great saves. That’s what it comes down to, is just stopping the puck. It doesn’t matter how you do it.”

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While Gothberg’s mask could be considered dull, his personality, as documented last year, is anything but. When he isn’t providing one-liners for Jared Knight to post on his twitter account, he’s freely admitting to his musical guilty pleasures. Gothberg said last year that he has listened to Miley Cyrus to get pumped up for games, but these days, his tune selection is more Bruins themed.

Gothberg said his playlists have been heavy on Wiz Khalifa, the man responsible for “Black and Yellow,” the Bruins’ warmup song.

The 18-year old said that the original version of the song was “pretty impressive,” but that Brad Marchand’s attempt at spitting a few measures of it prior to the B’s championship parade was “awesome.”

Double session for Bruins prospects

Friday, July 8th, 2011

WILMINGTON — The Bruins continued their development camp Friday with a double session at Ristuccia Arena. After an on-ice workout consisting of skating drills, the prospects took the ice again for a practice session.

All parties were present for the B’s prospects, including goalie Michael Hutchinson, who had left the ice Thursday after a collision with Jared Knight.

Jared Knight on expectations and the Brian Wilson obsession

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

WILMINGTON — Given that Tyler Seguin made it to the NHL as a rookie, only two of three Bruins’ pieces of the Phil Kessel deal were present at the open of development camp at Ristuccia Arena on Thursday. While 2011 ninth overall pick Dougie Hamilton (the player chosen with the other first-round pick acquired in the trade) was surrounded by a large media scrum that lasted as long as the Bruins’ availability, Knight didn’t attract as much attention. This isn’t his first rodeo, so the getting-to-know-you stage of Knight’s relationship with the Bruins is a thing of the past.

The 32nd overall pick of the 2010 draft impressed in last year’s development camp and into the team’s training camp, the latter of which he was cut from on Sept. 24. After finishing the OHL season with 70 regular-season points (25 goals, 45 assists) and six more in the playoffs, Knight signed an amateur tryout agreement and played the final three of the games for Providence. He picked up a pair of assists in the AHL.

“Last year, I think I put a lot of pressure on myself,” Knight recalled Thursday. “I was a little nervous coming in. This year, I’m a little nervous, but not as nervous as last year. I kind of knew what to expect.”

Now, the fans that have packed the stands at Ristuccia are a familiar sight. Knight could certainly compete for an NHL this year, but knows that there’s a time for that, and that it isn’t over the five-day development camp. Assistant general manager Don Sweeney has cautioned the players about over-thinking things, telling them “the Bruins are here to learn about you, and you’€™re here to learn about the Bruins and how we do things.” Back for a second time, it’s a message Knight has listened to.

“For me, this is my second time coming in here, so I have a little more experience. Really in development camp, you just come in and you try to work hard and try to show your best,” Knight said. “Sweeney said ‘You’re not coming here to make the team, you’re coming to make a good impression.’ That’s what I’m going to do, just work my hardest and just play hard.”

With the retirement of Mark Recchi and the free agent departure of Michael Ryder to the Stars, the signing of Benoit Pouliot means there remains a forward spot open heading into next year. While it could, in theory, be filled by a potential return of Marc Savard, it also means one of the youngsters could seize it themselves. Jordan Caron figures to play more than the 23 games at the NHL level he played a season ago, and in the spirit of healthy competition, the Bruins would have to be pleased with a group of their prospects making cases to play in Boston.

THE BRIAN WILSON OBSESSION

While Steven Kampfer and Seguin are both on Twitter, there is no better tweeter in the Bruins’ organization than Knight (@JKnight97). Interestingly enough, though, Knight does not even use a picture of himself to represent his account. Instead, it’s a picture of San Francisco Giants closer Brian Wilson.

“I love Brian Wilson,” Knight said Thursday. “He’s a crazy guy. I love the way he pitches. Other than hockey players, he’s my favorite athlete. He’s pretty cool. He’s pretty weird. I watch some of his interviews. He’s kind of psycho.”

Knight’s idol doesn’t exactly come from far away, as Wilson hails from Londonderry, N.H. The Michigan native has yet to cross paths with Wilson, but perhaps with the notoriety of being an NHL player will come such an opportunity.

“I haven’t met him. That would be pretty cool to meet him,” Knight said. “That’s one thing I want to do, is meet him, because he’s just different than everyone else.”

Knight may be a big fan of Wilson’s, but he doesn’t seem willing to copy his look yet. Missing is the shoe-polish-colored beard on the clean-shaven 19-year-old.

“If I could grow a beard like him, I would grow something like that,” Knight said. “I can’t yet. Maybe one day.”