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Bruins’ winning streak ends in a shootout

11.25.11 at 3:57 pm ET
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The Bruins’ winning streak was halted by the Red Wings Friday, as the B’s fell to Detroit, 3-2, in a matinee decided by a shootout. The Bruins had won their previous 10 games.

Todd Bertuzzi scored in the third round of the shootout to give the Red Wings the win after the Red Wings and Bruins had gotten goals from Pavel Datsyuk and Nathan Horton, respectively.

Though the Bruins dominated early, Valtteri Filppula gave the Red Wings a 1-0 lead on a give-and-go with Henrik Zetterberg. Daniel Paille tied it in the second period, but Pavel Datsyuk answered back when he beat Tuukka Rask 35 seconds later to give Detroit the lead back.

Patrice Bergeron tied the game once again for the Bruins in the third period when he picked Zetterberg’s pocket in front and beat Jimmy Howard with a powerful wrist shot to knot the game at two.

The Bruins will return to action Saturday, when they host the Jets for the first time since the Thrashers’ relocation.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

- Remember during the playoffs when Pierre McGuire compared David Krejci to Datsyuk? Just as it seemed at the time when Krejci was leading the Bruins in scoring, that’s proven to be a bit of an exaggeration. Datsyuk showed off his other-worldly skill set when he kicked the puck to himself in front of Rask to set up his goal, his sixth of the season.

It was an off-day for Krejci, meanwhile. Though he had a pair of takeaways, he did not have a shot on goal the entire day was was won just two of 12 face-offs. He also took a hooking penalty to negate what would have been an abbreviated power play for the Bruins in the second period. Krejci’s been hot of late (two goals and six assists for eight points over the previous nine games), Friday wasn’t his day.

- Johnny Boychuk was a minus-2, as he was the only Bruin on the ice for both of Detroit’s goals. The Dennis Seidenberg-Joe Corvo pairing was out there for both Bruins goals.

- He’s still far and away the Bruins’ best option on the power play, but Tyler Seguin is now 1-for-4 in shootouts this season.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- Another strong showing from Rask. The 24-year-old net minder, who was coming off three straight victories, didn’t have much of a chance on either of the Red Wings’ goals. Detroit’s first goal was a work of art, a beautiful give-and-go that saw Zetterberg feed Filppula to get the Wings on the board, while few goalies could be counted on to stop Datsyuk’s wizardry on his goal (see below). Rask lucked out when Danny Cleary hit the post with around seven minutes remaining in a tie game.

- No first goal? No problem. As Michael Berger pointed out on Twitter, the Bruins had allowed the first goal in five of the previous 10 games despite winning them all. This time around, it took a second consecutive third-period comeback, though Friday’s matchup provided far more of a challenge than Wednesday’s bout in Buffalo.

In general the Bruins came out with more pep in their step than had been seen in recent matinee games, and their 13-6 shots on goal advantage through 20 minutes. Though the Red Wings seemed to have seized control of the game in the second period, the Garden was an absolute mad house in the final 20 minutes.

- It was clear right off the bat that Chris Kelly was once again sharp as a tack Friday. The third-line center had two takeaways and won a face-off on his first shift, and later drew an interference call on Jonathan Ericsson to give the B’s their first power play of the day. Though Kelly did not register a point Friday, he has five goals and four assists
for nine points this month.

- Paille had his first point since he was hit in the face with a Steve Staios slap shot on Nov. 7. Nathan Horton picked off a puck from Howard behind the net, feeding it to Paille, who beat the scrambling Howard with a back-hander. It was Paille’s first point since donning the cage he is wearing to protect his healing face.

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