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Peter Chiarelli: Post-concussion symptoms accompanied progress with Nathan Horton

04.11.12 at 12:53 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli met with the media towards the end of Wednesday’s practice to discuss the team’s decision to shut Nathan Horton down for the playoffs.

Horton, who suffered his concussion on a Jan. 22 hit from Flyers forward Tom Sestito, was having a rough time in his recovery. He tried skating days after the concussion, but was shut down after suffering a setback. Horton returned to the ice last week, but he continued to feel post-concussion symptoms and the B’s didn’t want him to put pressure on himself to rush back.

“We felt it just wasn’€™t in the long-term interest of Nathan to be having the specter hanging over him of trying to come back during this playoff season,” Chiarelli said. “He’€™s made one step forward, and then two steps back and we just made the determination, upon consultation with our doctors, with Nathan, that it would be prudent to shut him down for the playoffs and continue to rehab for next year.”

The one step forward/two steps back is what made the decision clear for the Bruins.

“He’€™d be improving and then he’€™d have some symptoms,” Chiarelli said. “They weren’€™t huge symptoms, but they’€™d always come up at some point after three, four, five or six days of positive stuff.

“It was a frustrating exercise for Nathan, it was a frustrating exercise for us because we’€™ve been through this rehab before with players and I’€™ve seen all kinds of rehab patterns now because usually you can see when the player has color, and when he’€™s animated, you think he’€™s turned the corner and then they have a bout of post-concussion symptoms and they manifest themselves in different ways. With Nathan, sometimes it’€™d be just a fogginess, sometimes he wouldn’€™t feel right and sometimes there’€™d be a big headache. But it was always after three, four or five days of positive progress.”

Chiarelli added that Horton, who had 17 goals and 15 assists for 32 points in 46 games this season, was “relieved” when the decision was finally made to shut him down. The GM said Horton will rehab in off-hours and “might take a couple weeks off.”

“I think with Nathan, he gets within the group and he looks back at his contributions this past year and last playoffs and he starts getting anxious and that probably compounds it, too,” Chiarelli said. “I think he felt a sense of relief, and again talking to Nathan over the course of the last couple of weeks, he doesn’€™t look bad ‘€“ he looks good actually. But he gets these bouts ‘€“ the fogginess doesn’€™t feel right and you have to be very careful.”

Chiarelli was asked whether he is confident that Horton will be ready for next season, but as the B’s have learned in the past, you never know with concussions.

“Yeah, I am but who knows? Who knows?” he said while shrugging. “IGoing into two weeks ago you had asked me [about[ him playing this playoffs, I [would say], ‘€˜You know, there’€™s a chance.’€™ And then he had a couple of setbacks and then you have to take a step back and kind of look at the whole thing and that’€™s what we did.”

One thing that Chiarelli was adamant about was whether this concussion, which was initially termed “mild,” had anything to do with the concussion he suffered less than seven months earlier on a hit from Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals.

“Totally unconnected, totally unconnected and the symptoms were completely different,” Chiarelli said. ‘€¦ “It was clear to me it was totally unconnected to the first concussion.”

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Aaron Rome, Peter Chiarelli, Tom Sestito
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