Archive for June, 2013

Blackhawks buy full-page ad to thank Bruins, Boston

Friday, June 28th, 2013

The feeling throughout the Stanley Cup finals was that there was mutual respect between the Bruins and Blackhawks, a mostly unspoken appreciation for the opposing team’s style and work ethic.

Now, four days after Chicago won the series in six games, that continues to be the case.

The Blackhawks bought a full-page ad in Friday’s Boston Globe to thank the Bruins, the city and “especially the citizens of Boston” for the hospitality given to not only the Blackhawks, but also their fans who visited Beantown during the finals.

“Hockey is a tough game,” the open letter opens. “As impressed as we were by the strength, talent, and competitive spirit of the Boston Bruins on the ice, we were deeply touched by what happened off the ice.

“From Boston’s political leadership to every member of the Bruins organization; from the players to the people on the streets, you demonstrated respect, good sportsmanship, and a genuine love for the great game of hockey.”

The letter, signed by Blackhawks president/CEO John McDonough and Wirtz Corporation chairman Rocky Wirtz, ends this way:

“Like the rest of the world, Chicagoans have been reminded in recent days of Boston’s strength. Please know we tip our hat to your city’s big heart and gracious spirit. You lead by example and have set the bar very high for others to follow.”

Chicago also is hosting its Stanley Cup victory parade Friday.

Brad Marchand: ‘We had a good opportunity and it slipped through our fingers’

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Brad Marchand wasn’t hiding much on Wednesday during breakup day for the Bruins at TD Garden.

Marchand made it clear that he’s still pretty depressed about what happened on Monday night, when a 2-1 lead with less than 90 seconds left turned into a 3-2 loss in the matter of 17 seconds.

While there will be several veterans departing (Andrew Ference, Jaromir Jagr, Jay Pandolfo), the core of a talented young team will remain intact. That was reassuring but only small consolation Wednesday.

“Well, it’€™s definitely a little reassuring that we know we could potentially have a good team,” Marchand began. “I mean, things always happen, trades and everything like that, but for the most part the foundation is there. But I don’€™t think it changes what happened, we had a good opportunity and it slipped through our fingers. That was a tough game to swallow.”

But with names like Tyler Seguin, Torey Krug, Dougie Hamilton, Matt Bartkowski and Marchand himself, the team figures to make deep runs in the Cup playoffs a habit.

“I mean, you look at a lot of guys on our team are locked in here and they definitely did a great job of making sure were going to have a very good team for a while,” Marchand said. “And we’€™re very, very fortunate to be a part of this organization and this team. We definitely have a good group in here.”

With so much talk about injuries on Wednesday, did Marchand suffer any injury?

“Just my heart,” he quipped.

How is this year’s loss different that 2012 first-round exit to the Capitals?

“It’€™s definitely a lot better than losing in the first round, but it’€™s still disappointing,” Marchand said. “Whether you lose in the first round or the finals, you didn’€™t win. So it’€™s definitely different in ways where we made it here and had the opportunity but still didn’€™t win.”

Now Marchand and the Bruins begin a short summer break before September rolls around.

“It’€™s definitely going to be a little bit different,” he said. “We finished so late and we start a week early, so, I mean, were going to have to take a little bit less of a break and try to get back right into things quickly and get prepared for that training camp.”

Marchand was held without a point in the six games against Chicago and didn’t score a goal in the final eight games of the playoffs.

“They’€™re a good team,” Marchand said of the Blackhawks. “They were tough to play against, and things just didn’€™t go right. It would have been nice to contribute a little more.

“It was a different year. Missing up until Christmas time and coming back in, it was a different season. But you always want to try to improve in all areas of your game. I thought this year I was a little bit better defensively and tried to focus a little bit more on that, but definitely still areas to improve.”

Peter Chiarelli on Patrice Bergeron: ‘Of course he was at risk’

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

The only thing Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli felt certain of when it came to Patrice Bergeron Wednesday was that Bergeron was putting himself at some risk by playing with a broken rib and torn cartilage in Game 6 against Chicago.

Chiarelli confirmed that Bergeron, who also suffered a separated shoulder in the first period of Game 6, went to the hospital after the Blackhawks won the Cup and remained there for observation after it was determined that he had a small puncture in his lung.

Chiarelli said that Bergeron took a shot for the pain in his ribs before Game 6, “freezing” the area in pain.

“Of course he was at risk. Anytime anyone gets frozen up they’€™re at risk,” Chiarelli said. “Not for future injury, but from a pain perspective, and certainly he was at risk from the lung perspective, but it was a small puncture and he’€™s fine now.”

What was not clear from Chiarelli or Claude Julien on Wednesday is exactly when he suffered the puncture.

“There’€™s a freezing type of procedure, the nerve block, that Patrice opted to do so he could play in [Game 6], and at some point before or after the game, it could have been the cracked rib, there was a puncture in his lung,” Chiarelli said. “That’€™s why he was under observation following the game. It was a very small hole, and he’€™s fine. Patrice is fine. I don’€™t know when it happened.

“I don’€™t think he could have played if it happened during the game. I just, I don’€™t. I’€™m not a doctor, but I don’€™t think he could have played if it happened. He was aware of the risk going into it.”

Did Bergeron put his life at risk by playing?

“No, I don’€™t know exactly what had happened, but he couldn’€™t have played if it had happened during the game, so it may have happened after,” Chiarelli said. “We caught it and it was like he had a pain in his lung and we brought him to the hospital.”

It was Claude Julien who watched Bergeron closely from behind the bench throughout Game 6.

“If [punctured lung] had happened during the game, he wouldn’€™t have been able to recover as far as having that little puncture in his lung,” Julien said. “He wouldn’€™t have been able to recover, so the biggest speculation is that it didn’€™t happen during the game.”

“If it had happened during the game, he would have felt the pain and then he wouldn’€™t have been able to play, and the same thing, he would have been sent to the hospital and it would have been rectified,” Chiarelli said.

Zdeno Chara played with hip flexor

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli was not very forthcoming in regard to players’ injuries at Wednesday’s breakup day, though he did say that Zdeno Chara was playing through a hip flexor that was “pretty potent.”

Chara did not want to discuss his injury with reporters. Chiarelli added that he believes Nathan Horton (bankart procedure on his shoulder) is the the only player set to have offseason surgery.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Bruins won’t sign Jaromir Jagr or Andrew Ference, hope to keep Nathan Horton

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Breakup day often means the last day with a team for certain players, and the Bruins have a few.

Bruins general manager notified free agents Jaromir Jagr, Andrew Ference and Jay Pandolfo that they will not be re-signed by the team during Wednesday’s exit meetings. Ference and Jagr both told the media earlier that they didn’t expect to be back.

“I don’t think I will,” Jagr said. “Maybe if I would score 20 goals in the playoffs, it would be a different story. I was 20 short.”

Chiarelli told Nathan Horton that the team hopes to sign him and said that he will not be using amnesty buyouts. The Bruins’ cap situation will be very tight, even with Tuukka Rask and Horton the team’s priority free agents. Assuming they put Marc Savard on long-term injury reserve, the Bruins will have $9,180,833 to sign Rask and fill two forward spots, one of which they hope is Horton, as well as figure out backup goaltending plans. He did not rule out trading one of the team’s more substantial contracts as a means of opening up some cap space.

“We’ll find the right mix,” Chiarelli said, “but we do have some hard decisions to make, including deciding on re-signing players and deciding on retaining players.”

On other free agents, the team will take a wait-and-see approach with defenseman Wade Redden, while they have told backup goalie Anton Khudobin that they will address his situation once Rask is under contract.

Patrice Bergeron played with hole in lung

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said at Wednesday’s breakup day that in addition to Patrice Bergeron‘s broken rib, separated shoulder and torn cartilage and muscle tissue, it was revealed after Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals that Bergeron also had a small hole in his lung.

Bergeron was taken to the hospital following Game 6, where they discovered the hole in his lung. The team was unclear as to when or how the lung was punctured, though it was likely from a needle as a means of freezing the cartilage or from his broken rib. Bergeron left Game 4 briefly, left Game 5 and was taken to hospital and Chicago, and remains under observation in the hospital from his trip after Game 6.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Patrice Bergeron ‘under observation’ in hospital after playing through injuries

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Immediately after Monday night’s heartbreaking Game 6 loss that handed the Stanley Cup to the Blackhawks, Patrice Bergeron re-entered the hospital and remains there, the team announced Wednesday morning during break-up day at TD Garden.

Bergeron announced after the game that he was playing with a broken rib, torn cartilage and torn muscle from earlier in the final before suffering a separated shoulder during Game 6. The team said Bergeron was “under observation” at a local hospital.

Brad Marchand, Bergeron’s line-mate, spoke Wednesday about what it was like to watch Bergeron try and play through the injury in Game 6.

“You can’t say enough about him,” Marchand said. “He’s such a warrior. The fact he was able to play the whole game, every time I came to the bench, I was kind of nervous about him. I kind of watched him and I could see the pain and agony he was in. It was unbelievable to see him play through that. It just gives you that much more respect for him.”

Rich Peverley added, “It’s hard not to be in awe of him, as a player and a man.”

For more, visit the Bruins team page at weei.com/bruins.