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Photos: Bruins raise the Cup in Vancouver 06.16.11 at 12:24 am ET
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The Bruins blanked the Canucks, 4-0, in Game 7 at Rogers Arena to capture their first Stanley Cup since 1972. Click on the image below to launch a brief slide show of photos.

Bruins-Canucks Game 7 Live Blog: B’s win the Stanley Cup … talk about it 06.15.11 at 7:52 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — Join DJ Bean, Joey The Fish and many others from Rogers Arena for Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals. If the B’s win, they will hoist the Stanley Cup for the first time since 1972.

Bruins-Canucks Game 7 Live Blog

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Stanley Cup Finals,
Poll: Who will win Bruins-Canucks Game 7? 06.15.11 at 7:36 am ET
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What will happen in Wednesday night's Stanley Cup finals Game 7?

  • Bruins win close game in regulation (49%, 221 Votes)
  • Bruins rout Canucks (23%, 103 Votes)
  • I don't know, but if Alex Burrows scores the game-winner, I might smash my TV (10%, 44 Votes)
  • Canucks win close game in regulation (8%, 35 Votes)
  • Bruins win in overtime (7%, 34 Votes)
  • Canucks rout Bruins (2%, 9 Votes)
  • Canucks win in overtime (1%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 454

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Read More: Bruins, Canucks, Stanley Cup Finals,
Not tired yet: B’s chase Roberto Luongo, force Game 7 06.13.11 at 11:07 pm ET
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By DJ Bean and Scott McLaughlin

The Bruins weren’t ready to see their season end or willing to watch the Canucks raise the Stanley Cup on their ice Monday and it showed, as they chased Roberto Luongo at the Garden again in a 5-2 win at TD Garden to force a Game 7 of the finals. The Cup winner will be determined at Rogers Arena in Vancouver Wednesday night.

Brad Marchand opened the scoring at 5:31 with his third goal in the last four games. With nine goals this postseason, he has set the postseason record for a Bruins rookie.

Milan Lucic followed with a goal of his own at 6:06, and an Andrew Ference power-play goal at 8:35 ended Luongo’s night early in favor of Cory Schneider. Luongo has now gotten the hook in two games this series, both of which were at the Garden.

Michael Ryder and David Krejci chipped in goals as well, with Krejci’s coming on the power play in the third period. The Canucks got contributions on the scoreboard from Henrik Sedin (his first point of the finals) and Maxim Lapierre. Tim Thomas has now allowed eight goals over six games this series.

Wednesday night will be the Bruins’ third Game 7 in four rounds this postseason,as they eliminated both the Canadiens and Lightning in seven games. The Canucks beat the Blackhawks in seven games, their only seven-game series this postseason.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– Luongo was bad once again, and it seemed that all it took was Marchand’s goal, an absolute rifle glove-side, so open up the floodgates. The Bruins certainly have a way of getting to the highly-scrutinized Canucks netminder in Boston, as he has now allowed 15 goals in less than two games’ worth of play at TD Garden this series. The problem when it comes to the play of Luongo vs. the Bruins, of course, is that he has not had such issues in Vancouver. He’s allowed just two goals over three games and has posted two shutouts.

– The Bruins talked a lot about getting more traffic in front of the net after being shut out in Game 5, and they certainly did that Monday night. Their third and fourth goals came as the direct result of having bodies in front. Mark Recchi set a perfect screen on Ference’s power-play goal that chased Luongo from the game. A minute later Ryder got in front of Schneider and tipped Tomas Kaberle‘s shot into the top corner. Needless to say, continuing to get traffic to the net will be a key for the Bruins in Game 7.

– A couple of nice statistical nights for the defensemen. Kaberle had a pair of assists on the night, giving him 11 points this postseason — the most among Boston defensemen. Ference led all B’s in ice time.

On a more peculiar note (and this may not necessarily be bad), Dennis Sieidenberg didn’t see the ice from until 1:22 of the third period until 11:32 and was not on the bench for a time. We’ll see whether this was equipment or injury-related.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

– While the Bruins dominated the first period with relative ease, but Vancouver did come to life from there. The Canucks seemed to regain focus with Schneider in net and spent far more time in the Bruins’ zone. Three power plays will do that, but it should be taken as a sign that just because Luongo collapses, doesn’t mean the hole team does. The Canucks outshot the B’s, 11-8, in the second period and opened the third period by finally getting on the board.

Jannik Hansen thought he had made it 4-2 shortly after, though his shot rang off the post and bounced back as though it had gone in and out. Were it not for the Canucks handing the B’s a 1:13 two-man advantage (on which Krejci scored) with 13:49 to play, the Canucks could have really put a serious fight to make it a close one.

– The idea of a brother Sedin scoring on the power play was something people were prepared to get used to entering the series, but the Bruins had done an excellent job of keeping both the Sedins and the Canucks’ power play silent. Henrik got plenty fancy in beating Thomas for his third-period goal. The tally was his third goal of the postseason and his 22nd point, putting him in a tie with Krejci for the postseason lead in the latter category until Krejci scored to jump back ahead.

– For the first time in his NHL career, Patrice Bergeron was called for four penalties in one game, three of them in the second period. First he was whistled for goaltender interference when he steamrolled Schneider while trying to tip home a centering pass. Then he went off for hauling down Ryan Kesler behind the play. And in the final minute of the period, his elbow came up a little too high while throwing a hit on Christian Ehrhoff. In the third, he and Alexandre Burrows earned matching minors for extracurriculars after the Bruins’ fifth goal. The eight penalty minutes were a new career-high for Bergeron, beating his previous high of seven on April 18, 2009, against the Canadiens. That was also a playoff game — Game 2 of what became a four-game sweep.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, David Krejci, Stanley Cup Playoffs, Tim Thomas
Bruins-Canucks Live Blog: Maxim Lapierre cuts B’s lead to 5-2 06.13.11 at 7:28 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia, Joey the Fish and plenty others from TD Garden for Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals. It’s real simple for the Bruins: win or watch the Canucks hoist the Cup on the B’s ice.

Bruins-Canucks Game 6 Live Blog

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Stanley Cup Finals,
Who is the biggest villain on the Canucks? You be the judge 06.12.11 at 12:19 am ET
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You’re going to find this hard to believe, but there are about five area codes full of people in New England who don’t like certain members of the Canucks these days. Some of it stems from the fact the Bruins are in a 3-2 Stanley Cup finals hole. But it stretches beyond just the issues that face Claude Julien‘s team as it sits on the brink of elimination.

It has gotten personal.

Which Canucks player is the biggest villain?

  • Alexandre Burrows (63%, 239 Votes)
  • Maxim Lapierre (20%, 76 Votes)
  • Aaron Rome (9%, 36 Votes)
  • Daniel and Henrik Sedin (4%, 15 Votes)
  • Roberto Luongo (4%, 13 Votes)

Total Voters: 379

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So the question is this: Which member of the Canucks has raised your ire the most? The choices are …

ALEX BURROWS

Age: 30

Position: Wing

Reason for ire: Burrows got the animosity kicked into high gear in Game 1 when he (allegedly) chomped down on Patrice Bergeron‘s finger. Making matters worse was when the NHL offered no disciplinary action, leading to Burrows scoring two goals in Game 2, including the game-winner in overtime. Milan Lucic eased the pain of Bruins fans a bit in Game 3 by first pounding the forward’s head during a scrum, and then taunting him by offering his own finger. Yet, still, Burrows has already ingrained himself in Boston sports lore with his dastardly actions.

ROBERTO LUONGO

Age: 32

Position: Goalie

Reason for ire: Luongo was cruising along through the finals, simply serving as the other team’s goalie who had some good games, and (much to the delight of Bruins fans) some really bad ones. But then came the press conference following Game 5, when he uttered the following phrase regarding Max Lapierre‘s goal against Tim Thomas: ‘€œIt’€™s not hard if you’€™re playing in the paint,’€ Luongo said of the difficulty of the play. ‘€œIt’€™s an easy save for me, but if you’€™re wandering out and aggressive like he does, that’€™s going to happen. He might make some saves that I won’€™t, but in a case like that, we want to take advantage of a bounce like that and make sure we’€™re in a good position to bury those.’€ Matters were only made worse Saturday when Luongo not only didn’t back off the statement, but commented about how Thomas hadn’t complimented him (see video below).

MAX LAPIERRE

Age: 26

Position: Center

Reason for ire: Lapierre first entered Bruins’ fans radar in Game 2 when he took “Bite-Gate” to another level, taunting Bergeron by holding out his finger as an offering to pull a “Burrows.” Boston’s Mark Recchi enacted some revenge by executing the same sort of shenanigans in Game 3, presenting his own finger to Lapierre for a sampling. Then came the ultimate disgrace in the eyes of Bruins fans: Lapierre scored the game-winner in Game 5. In the eyes of Boston fans, simply unacceptable.

AARON ROME

Age: 27

Position: Defenseman

Reason for ire: He left his feet to deliver the crushing open-ice hit on Nathan Horton that resulted in a concussion and the Bruins losing one of their top scorers for the rest of the playoffs. Sure, Rome tried to reach out to Horton to express his concern for the winger, and the NHL suspended Rome for four games, a period that will cover the rest of the Stanley Cup finals.

None of that is of any consolation to the Bruins, who lost one of their top offensive players while the Canucks go without a third-pairing defenseman. Most New Englanders viewed the play as dirty, and with the B’s offense sputtering in Game 5, it certainly could have been a difference-maker in the series.

HENRIK AND DANIEL SEDIN

Ages: 31

Position: Forward

Reason for ire: The were supposed to represent the reason Bruins fans should be wary of going up against the Canucks, but have done little live up to their reputation. They have been pushed around, with nary a sign of fighting back with what can be a boatload of hockey wizardry. But besides the fact that the twins are being viewed as posers by many who follow the B’s, also not helping their reputation was the pregame introduction the pair executed prior to Game 2, in which they called Burrows a vegetarian.

Bruins-Canucks live blog: Maxim Lapierre makes it 1-0 06.10.11 at 7:51 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — Join DJ Bean and a cast of other from Vancouver for Game 5 of the Stanley Cup finals. The B’s are looking for their first series lead.

Bruins-Canucks Game 5 Live Blog

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Stanley Cup Finals,
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