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Andy Brickley on M&M: Keith Yandle, Mark Streit, Dan Boyle possible Bruins targets as trade deadline approaches 04.03.13 at 12:34 pm ET
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NESN’s Andy Brickley spoke with Mut & Merloni on Wednesday about what the Bruins could do in the last few hours before the 3 p.m. trade deadline and where he sees Jaromir Jagr fitting into the lineup.

Brickley said he thinks the Bruins would do best to add a defenseman before the deadline, and that the three names he’s seen thrown around most are Keith Yandle, Dan Boyle and Mark Streit.

“I’ve been a big Yandle fan for a long time because he’s a local kid, and you’ve always got to pull for them,” Brickley said. “Boyle’s a proven winner, won a Stanley Cup. He’s a right-handed shot who would fit nice on a power play right now with Dougie Hamilton, who’s really your only right-handed shot you can put on the back end if you’re playing with your four forwards. Boyle can run a pretty good power play. But I think Streit’s the guy that’s probably the most attainable when you talk about what you’re going to give up to get what you want. I think those are the three names that are probably pretty attractive to Boston right now.”

Brickley noted that the Bruins haven’t been afraid to deal high draft picks and top prospects in the past to get the players they want, especially during their 2011 Stanley Cup run.

“Maybe you have to deal a current asset that’s not a future first-round pick if the expectation is that conditional second turns into a first in that deal for Jagr,” Brickley said. “I do like the fact that the Bruins are willing to make those kinds of trades. When you take a look at ‘€¦ how they constructed that 2011 Cup team, they dealt first-rounders, whether they were future first-rounders or current first-rounders that were at some point in their development. In the [Mark] Recchi deal they dealt that kid [Matt] Lashoff. He was a first-rounder. The [Rich] Peverley deal, two first-rounders, [Mark] Stuart and [Blake] Wheeler. The [Nathan] Horton-[Gregory] Campbell deal, that was [Dennis] Wideman and a first-rounder, and even [TomasKaberle, that was two first-rounders, [Joe] Colborne and a future first-rounder. So they’ve shown that they will do what they need to do when they target those certain players.”

Jagr seems likely to start out playing on David Krejci‘s wing, although Brickley noted that sometimes linemates don’t click even if the pairing seem logical.

“I think it’s only natural that they try to hook him up with David Krejci, but sometimes that doesn’t work out,” Brickley said. “I would never make the analogy that [Michael] Ryder is a Jaromir Jagr, but when Ryder was acquired by Boston, the expectation was that he was playing with a top-two centerman, whether it was [PatriceBergeron or Krejci or a healthy Marc Savard, for that matter. He probably did his most damage in the playoffs playing on the third line with [Chris] Kelly and Peverley. So you never know what kind of chemistry you’re going to get when you hook certain players up.”

Following are more highlights from the conversation. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page. For more Bruins coverage, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

On whether the Bruins need to add a forward or defenseman at the deadline: “I don’t know if it’s a necessity because I think this is still a pretty strong team if everyone’s healthy on their back end. I’d like to see them, and I think everyone would like to see the Bruins do that. The players in the room would certainly like to see another defenseman of NHL quality, somewhere in a top-five as far as their rating.

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Read More: Andy Brickley, Jaromir Jagr, Tuukka Rask, Tyler Seguin
Barry Pederson on D&C: Jaromir Jagr ‘a star, not a superstar’ 04.03.13 at 9:55 am ET
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NESN’s Barry Pederson talked to Dennis & Callahan on Wednesday about the impact Jaromir Jagr could have on the Bruins, what he’ll have to do to fit into the B’s system, and Patrice Bergeron‘s situation after leaving Tuesday’s game with an injury.

Pederson said he thinks Jagr will thrive in a supporting role, similar to the one he played in Philadelphia last year, not to mention in Pittsburgh when he first broke into the league.

“He’s coming to a good team that he’s just trying to make great,” Pederson said. “He’s probably a star, not a superstar. He’s definitely a top-six forward, and I think the other thing it does for this team is it brings in competition. For the coach, he doesn’t have to do a lot of yelling, or say a lot of things in the press. Just, ‘OK you’re not going on the top two lines, I’ve got another forward here, a Hall of Famer that wants to come in here and play.’ ”

Pederson played with Jagr on the Cup-winning 1990-91 Penguins team in Jagr’s first season in the NHL. He said Jagr had his own “Euro fashion” off the ice, but that on the ice he exhibited the qualities that have kept him among the league’s top players to this day.

“He came over with all kinds of raw talent,” Pederson said. “You have to remember, on that team, with [Mario] Lemieux there, he was the guy that was kind of making all those eyes turn. But what I remember about [Jagr] the most at a young age was how gifted he was, lower body down. Similar to a Ray Bourque where you have those strong legs and that big butt, you couldn’t knock him over. He had a great release. He’d go to those dirty areas and had a knack for getting in front and scoring big goals.”

Despite Jagr causing some locker-room controversy in his earlier days, Pederson said he believes Jagr has matured into a veteran leader.

“I think you’re going to be surprised as to what you’re going to hear in the dressing room,” Pederson said. “When you read all the accounts of Philadelphia ‘€¦ they think they really missed his presence in the locker room. I think he’s really matured as a person and i think that’s really going to show here.”

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Read More: Jaromir Jagr, Patrice Bergeron,
Breakdown of possible Bruins trade targets: Jaromir Jagr, Ryane Clowe, Mark Streit, etc. 03.29.13 at 2:01 pm ET
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With Jarome Iginla off the market, the Bruins still are hoping to bring in an impact player before the April 3 trade deadline, likely a defenseman to bolster their depth there or a top-nine forward. Here’s a look at who they may be considering.

Martin St. Louis, F, Lightning

Despite having the third- and fourth-highest scorers in the league, Tampa Bay is outside the playoff picture looking in right now, and consequently, rumors have swirled about a possible St. Louis trade. St. Louis, 37, has eight goals and 34 assists this year in 33 games, and his 42 points are good for fourth in the league behind Steven Stamkos.

Tampa GM Steve Yzerman told ESPN.com’s Pierre LeBrun Friday that St. Louis will not be traded. With Iginla off the market, though, many see St. Louis as second prize, another forward who’s past his prime but can clearly still make a significant impact. He is signed through next season with a $5.625 million cap hit and a no-trade clause.

Here’s a look at St. Louis scoring a hat trick in his 900th career game, against the Devils on Feb. 4, 2012.

Jaromir Jagr, F, Stars

Plenty of teams would love to bring in Jagr at the deadline for a playoff run, but the Stars reportedly would like to re-sign him. Jagr’s 25 points (14 goals and 11 assists) are a team high, and he’s making $4.55 million on his current one-year deal.

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Read More: Jaromir Jagr, Jay Bouwmeester, Mark Streit, Martin St. Louis
Pierre McGuire on M&M: ‘I don’t think Calgary paid attention to doing their due diligence’ 03.29.13 at 12:10 pm ET
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NBC’s Pierre McGuire joined Mut & Merloni on Friday to talk about what went wrong with the Jarome Iginla trade and what the Bruins can do now that Iginla is off the market.

McGuire said Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli did nothing wrong to jeopardize the Iginla deal. Rather, Flames GM Jay Feaster mishandled the trade — not the first time Calgary’s management has made a visible mistake this year.

“I don’t think Calgary paid attention to doing their due diligence. I really don’t,” McGuire said. “Jay Feaster, I’m sure, told Peter Chiarelli, ‘You guys have won the sweepstakes. You have Jarome Iginla. I’m sure he told them that, because I was in Boston to do that game, and there’s no way there was that much information that was so fluid around the Bruins dressing room when I got to the rink at 4:30, that you didn’t know that this deal was going down. So ‘€¦ then Jay Feaster didn’t prioritize. He should have called [Iginla’s agent] Donny Meehan before he called Peter Chiarelli.

“Instead, he told Boston they had the player, and Donny Meehan gets the call from Feaster saying he’s been traded, and Donny Meehan says, ‘No, no, that’s not how this works.’ ‘€¦ I think the biggest reason there was no trade call made was when Jay Feaster called Donny Meehan and said, ‘By the way, we’ve moved Jarome to Boston,’ Donny Meehan said, ‘No you haven’t, because Jarome wants to go to Pittsburgh.’ ”

Iginla’s press conference after the trade made clear that he was headed to Pittsburgh no matter what Chiarelli did, McGuire said.

“When you heard him talk, he said, ‘How can you blow away now playing with the two best players in the world?’ ” McGuire said. “With all due respect, he wasn’t talking about [DavidKrejci and he wasn’t talking about [PatriceBergeron. Both guys are great players. He was talking about Crosby and Malkin.”

With Iginla off the table, McGuire said he thinks the Bruins should focus on acquiring a defenseman, and mentioned 35-year-old Islanders blueliner Mark Streit as a possibility.

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Read More: Jarome Iginla, Peter Chiarelli, Pierre McGuire,
Offense comes back to life in 6-5 shootout loss 03.28.13 at 12:03 am ET
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Because six Bruins failed to beat Peter Budaj in a shootout, the clearest takeaway from the Bruins’€™ 6-5 loss to Montreal on Wednesday was another blown third-period lead. However, the reason the Bruins had a lead to blow was that the offense came alive for the first time in a week and half, with five different players scoring.

In their last five games before Wednesday, the Bruins had 10 goals (and one of those came in a shootout). Against Montreal, they knocked Carey Price out of the net with four goals in the second period and finished the game with 41 shots.

‘€œIt was nice to see us score some goals tonight,’€ Bruins coach Claude Julien said. ‘€œWe’€™ve been a little dry lately, and we managed to score five, so that was nice to see.’€

Perhaps it was a bad omen when Dougie Hamilton was the first Bruin on the board, as they’€™re now 0-4 when he scores. Still, Hamilton cut Montreal’€™s lead in half just 39 seconds after P.K. Subban had made it 2-0, and his goal sparked a momentum shift in the Bruins’€™ direction.

Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line reappeared with a vengeance, recording a total of nine points between Bergeron, Brad Marchand and Tyler Seguin. Each scored a goal, and Bergeron added three assists. Seguin had two and Marchand one.

That was especially encouraging for Marchand, as the second-chance goal he scored to tie the game at two was only his second in the last 12 games. After a shaky start to the game, Nathan Horton also broke a drought, scoring for the first time in six games and only the second time in the last 15.

The Bruins’€™ last two goals came on rushes, with perfectly timed passes through the slot, but their first three came from persistence on second and third chances. Despite being pulled after allowing four goals on 26 shots, Price made the Bruins work for their first three. They were equal to the challenge, winning races to rebounds and maintaining possession in the zone until they found clear shooting lanes.

Although Bergeron’€™s line, the Bruins’€™ most productive this year, ended up playing together by the middle of the game, they didn’€™t start the night that way. Julien started Daniel Paille with Bergeron and Seguin instead, and Marchand said the change, however brief, helped him.

‘€œMaybe just to let me know I’€™ve got to simplify a little bit,’€ Marchand said. ‘€œAt times, when you play with each other for a while, you start only looking for each other, and try to make pretty plays instead of doing things that work, which is keeping it simple and taking pucks to the net. And that’€™s what worked for us tonight.’€

Read More: Brad Marchand, Dougie Hamilton, Montreal Canadiens,
Barry Pederson on D&C: ‘I think [Bruins] are going to make a deal’ 03.27.13 at 9:45 am ET
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Barry Pederson of NESN joined Dennis & Callahan on Wednesday morning to discuss what the Bruins might do before the trade deadline, what price they should pay for a player like Jarome Iginla, and why Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic are struggling to produce.

“I think they believe, the way they are constructed right now, they feel they have the potential to win, but I think there’s a lot of question marks,” Pederson said. “They need to get their offense going. They need to get their power play going.”

Pederson said the Bruins could be justified in giving up Malcolm Subban, another highly regarded prospect and a draft pick for Iginla if they’re confident they can sign Iginla to a multi-year deal. He also brought up Martin St. Louis as a possible trade target for the Bruins.

“I think he’s got a lot more to give and he would probably like to win another Cup,” Pederson said of St. Louis. “I just love his game, and I think the Bruins’ fans do as well. He can play all three positions. He may be small in stature, but as we have seen, he is a guy that gives it. He’s got great intensity. He brings offense. He makes your power play better. I think he would love to play in this system with this team. And they’re in the selling mode. That’s another name to me that’s very intriguing. [Compared to Iginla] I think the price with St. Louis would be a little bit more.”

Whether or not the Bruins deal for one of the bigger names on the market, Pederson said he thinks GM Peter Chiarelli will either do something to bolster the top six forwards or add depth to the defense, or both.

“I think they’re going to make a deal,” he said. “[AdamMcQuaid‘s injury puts you in a tough position. Chris Kelly, you don’t know how he’s going to come back from that injury ‘€¦ The other thing we have to remember is, this is the first time since the last collective bargaining agreement that next year’s salary cap is going lower. If you’re a seller, you may be better off now making a deal now than waiting for the summertime when everybody has to do it.”

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Read More: Barry Pederson, Jarome Iginla, Jaromir Jagr, Martin St. Louis
Pierre McGuire on M&M: ‘Boston, Pittsburgh and Montreal are the three best teams in the Eastern Conference’ 03.22.13 at 12:31 pm ET
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NBC commentator Pierre McGuire spoke with Mut & Merloni Friday about where the Bruins stand among the top teams in the East, what problems Dougie Hamilton could be facing, and what might happen with Jarome Iginla before the trade deadline.

“I would say Boston, Pittsburgh and Montreal are the three best teams in the Eastern Conference,” McGuire said, noting that the Penguins‘ fourth-line forwards contribute on offense and that the Bruins have a similar degree of depth.

“You go watch Danny Paille play — he’s having a great year for Boston. He’s a fourth-line player. His skill level is pretty excessive too, for a depth player. Gregory Campbell‘s skill level’s not so bad. Rich Peverley‘s skill level’s not so bad. So the Bruins can match [the Penguins] in terms of depth skill, and that’s one of the things you’re going to have to have if you’re going to win in the East.”

McGuire said fatigue could be a factor in the struggles of both Milan Lucic and Hamilton. Lucic’s game has been less physical this year, and McGuire said that’s been a trend across the NHL.

“Early on we were seeing the physical teams be physical,” McGuire said. “I would say right now, we’re starting to see some guys let up a little bit. I was talking to Mario Lemieux about this the other day in Pittsburgh, and he said one of the hard parts about the 48-game schedule is that as you get to the halfway point, it’s more than that, because you haven’t had training camp and you are fatigued and you are breaking down.

“There’s a little less physical play, there’s more speed play, there’s a lot more open ice. ‘€¦ I’m not saying that’s the problem with Milan, but I do think fatigue is becoming a very real issue for a lot of players around the league.”

Peverley’s benching has been seen by some as Claude Julien‘s attempt to send a message, but McGuire said he doesn’t think that’s the case.

“Sometimes the games go a lot slower when you’re upstairs and you get a chance to see, maybe you do have more time to make a play, maybe you do have a different outlet and a different decision you can make,” McGuire said. “It’s not really so much about message-sending, I think it’s more getting the player refocused and re-energized.

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Read More: Dougie Hamilton, Pierre McGuire, Rich Peverley,
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