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Milan Lucic on handshake threats: ‘I’m not sorry that I did it’ 05.16.14 at 5:27 pm ET
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Bruins forward Milan Lucic said at Friday’s breakup day that he does not regret what he did in the handshake line following Game 7 of the second round, when he allegedly told Canadiens players that he was going to kill them.

Canadiens forward Dale Weise told reporters about the incident after the game, which drew criticism from Lucic both after the game and again on Friday.

“What’s said on the ice, stays on the ice and fortunately that code is broken and it’s unfortunate that it blows up to what it is now,” Lucic said Friday. “I’m not the first guy to do it, I’m not the last guy to do [it]. I’m not sorry that I did it. I’m a guy that plays on emotion and this is a game of emotions. Sometimes you make decisions out of emotions that may not be the best ones. That’s what it is. I didn’t make the NHL because I accepted losing and accepted failure. I think that’s what’s got me to this point and made me the player that I am. Other than that, there’s not that much to it. I’m not the first guy to do it and I’m sure I won’t be the last.”

Lucic was asked for clarification as to whether he wasn’t sorry.

“I can’t take back what I said,” he said. “I’m not apologizing for what was said in the handshake and, like I said, it’s just unfortunate that what was said on the ice gets leaked out and gets blown way out of proportion.”

Read More: Milan Lucic,
Bruins injury roundup: Matt Fraser played on broken foot 05.16.14 at 1:30 pm ET
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As is customary on breakup day, word emerged on injuries the Bruins dealt with during the postseason. The bravest of the bunch proved to be Matt Fraser, who played the entire postseason with a broken foot.

Fraser, who was sporting a cast and crutches Friday, broke his right foot in Game 1 of the first round of the AHL postseason while playing for the Providence Bruins. He was dealing with the injury when he was called up in the second round by the Bruins and he scored the overtime winner in Game 4 of the second round for Boston.

Chris Kelly, who suffered a back injury late in the season, had a herniated disc and said it was the most pain he had ever dealt with. Kelly said he hoped he could have returned in some point in the playoffs but wasn’t sure. Kelly will undergo surgery at some point.

Milan Lucic was sporting a soft cast on his left wrist after suffering an injury in Game 7 of the second round against Montreal. He was set to receive an MRI on Friday.

Regarding Zdeno Chara‘s fractured finger, the Bruins captain said that he might not need surgery.

As for Dennis Seidenberg, the defenseman said his plan all along was to return this season after tearing his ACL and MCL on Dec. 27 and having surgery in early January. Seidenberg said he would have been able to play in the Eastern Conference finals had the team gotten there.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Chris Kelly, Dennis Seidenberg, Matt Fraser, Milan Lucic
Report: Zdeno Chara played through fractured finger 05.15.14 at 7:56 pm ET
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Slovakian national team general manager Otto Sykora told reporters Thursday that Bruins captain Zdeno Chara would not be joining the Slovakian team at the World Hockey Championships because Chara required surgery on a finger he fractured during the second round of the NHL playoffs against the Canadiens.

Chara was slashed in the first period of Game 3 by Michael Bournival and left the ice briefly but returned to the game. Chara’s play diminished as the series went on, and he looked to be in pain after being slashed in the same area by Max Pacioretty in Game 7.

The final two games of the series were particularly bad for Chara, as he failed to take the body on Pacioretty in Game 6 on a play in which Pacioretty scored, while he had a pair of weak giveaways during a first-period penalty kill in Game 7 and saw Montreal’s final goal of the series go off his skate and past Tuukka Rask.

This marks the second consecutive season in which Chara had to play through an injury at the end of the season, as he struggled through a hip injury against the Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup finals last season.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Zdeno Chara,
Canadiens bounce Bruins in Game 7 05.14.14 at 9:49 pm ET
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The Presidents’ Trophy will have to do, as the Bruins were eliminated in the second round by the Canadiens Wednesday night. The Canadiens started stronger and finished better as they upset the No. 1 seeded Bruins by taking a 3-1 victory in the winner-take-all Game 7.

The Bruins had a nightmare of a first period, turning the puck over seven times and seeing Dale Weise sneak behind Matt Bartkowski and tap a pass from Daniel Briere past Tuukka Rask just 2:18 into the game. The Bruins were dominated throughout the first 20 minutes but survived — including the killing off of two penalties — having just allowed the one goal.

Brad Marchand was penalized for spraying Carey Price on the first shift of the second period, so the Bruins didn’t get a chance to push back until they killed off the minor penalty. That push came about four minutes into the period, but their best chances fell short as Price stopped Patrice Bergeron on a two-on-one and David Krejci shot the puck over the net after taking a drop pass from Jarome Iginla.

Boston’s push would prove to be for naught, as a collection of breakdowns led to David Desharnais feeding Max Pacioretty alone at the right circle and Pacioretty send the puck past a diving Rask to make it 2-0.

Though the Bruins had only one shot on a power play that they received less than two minutes later, they got another chance when Pacioretty was whistled for holding the stick at 16:05 and they capitalized when Jarome Iginla redirected a Torey Krug shot past Price to get the Bruins on the board.

The Bruins were forced to kill off a David Krejci holding the stick penalty late in the second period, which carried over into the first 1:14 of the third period. Iginla hit yet another post on a chance to tie the game about four and a half minutes into the third period. Iginla had plenty of space after getting the rebound of a Krejci shot, but his sliding bid hit the right post to contribute to Boston’s double-digit post count for the series.

The backbreaker came in the final five minutes, when Johnny Boychuk took an interference penalty in the neutral zone following a Krejci giveaway in the offensive zone. That led to a power play goal that saw a puck from Briere go off Zdeno Chara‘s skate and in to make it 3-1 with 2:53 remaining.

The Canadiens will advance to play the Rangers in the Eastern Conference finals. The Bruins will have the offseason to mull a promising season that ended short of expectations.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS Read the rest of this entry »

How much has first goal mattered in Bruins-Canadiens series? 05.14.14 at 1:40 pm ET
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The team that scores the first goal Wednesday night will win Game 7 and advance to the Eastern Conference finals, provided it is a 1-0 game.

Aside from that, the first goal, for all the hype that comes with it, has by no means been a ticket to victory. Though the team that’s scored the first goal has won each of the first six games this series, two of those games involved the winning team relinquishing their lead before winning the game later.

The Canadiens scored first in Game 1 and took a 2-0 lead before the B’s came back in the third to tie the game. The Habs eventually won in overtime. In Game 2, Boston scored first but allowed three straight goals before coming back with four in a row in the third.

Playing with a lead is extremely important, but it isn’t until a team has a two or three goal lead — especially if its early — that they can smother the opponent by sitting back and relying on the counterattack.

“I don’t think you can really pack it in at any point of the game,” Mike Weaver said Wednesday morning. “Boston’s notorious for coming back, even with six minutes left. They’re a team that keeps on coming at you, and you can’t let your foot off the pedal at any point in the game.”

Another good example of this is Game 6. The Canadiens took a 1-0 lead in the opening minute of the game on a Lars Eller goal, yet it wasn’t until they got a pair of goals late in the second period that they were able to put the B’s away. Much of the first two periods — especially early in the second — saw the Bruins match or outplay the Habs and generate plenty of chances.

“The scoring chances were there,” Daniel Paille said of how the B’s played down a goal. “It’s more about bearing down and not getting frustrated. We know that goals can come and some nights they don’t go in, but for us, it is key to maintain composure and not stay too frustrated.”

There was no comeback for the Bruins in that game. There were comebacks in the first two games of the series, and though Weaver said there was no lesson to be learned in those games, it did serve as a reminder that playing with the lead isn’t always a run-out-the-clock situation.

“I think we got away from our game,” Weaver said of the Bruins’ comebacks. “It’s something that, you’ve got to play a full 60. Especially with what has happened in the playoffs. You guys remind of stats that kind of happen through all the playoffs, not just this series. You have that in the back of your mind that you have to keep on going, keep on pushing.”

Matt Fraser provided the most memorable “first goal” of the series with the overtime winner in Game 4, with Nathan Horton‘s goal in Game 7 of the 2011 conference finals standing as perhaps the most memorable in recent history. That game was played 5-on-5 the whole way, with no penalties taken on either side.

The first goal can obviously be a difference-maker, and the later it is, the better. This series has shown that it’s that second goal that matters more.

Read More: Daniel Paille, Mike Weaver,
Canadiens getting as much out of ‘disrespect’ card as they can 05.14.14 at 1:10 pm ET
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Teams come up with different ways to psych themselves up for big moments. The Canadiens are using the Bruins’ lack of respect of them — regardless of whether there’s actually a lack of respect — as fuel heading into Game 7.

On Tuesday, it was Brandon Prust, saying that when it came to the Bruins dissin’ his crew, the Habs wouldn’t “stoop to their level.” After Wednesday’s morning skate, Mike Weaver weighed in.

“I think they play the same way, whatever way they’re playing,” Weaver said. “Obviously we’ve got to earn our respect, too. That’s Boston for you.”

It’s all so vague, and at face value, it seems like a team stretching to come up with motivation. Disrespect? The teams don’t like each other, sure, but are the Bruins stealing cabs from Canadiens players around Boston or something?

Perhaps it’s the muscle-flexing, the water-bottle-squirting, the participation in scrums. Much of what happened late in Game 6, which started this whole weird narrative, was the result of a David Desharnais slew-foot and an Andrei Markov stick to Zdeno Chara‘s groin that went uncalled.

So what are the Canadiens talking about when they say they’re being disrespected?

“Well, watch the clips. The whole entire series you can see little things out there,” Weaver said. “But I think that’s their game. Our game is just playing. The other stuff isn’t really a factor.”

Claude Julien said after Game 6 that he wasn’t saying the Bruins were innocent, but said that the idea that the Bruins are the bad guys and the Canadiens are good guys is overstated. Both teams pull stunts, which is true. Shawn Thornton shouldn’t have squirted P.K. Subban, but Subban shouldn’t have put Thornton in a dangerous spot in Game 2.

The mocking has gone both ways. Dale Weise has now mocked the Bruins twice — once by pounding his chest (a Bruins celebration) in Game 3 and once by flexing (like Milan Lucic) in Game 6.

Is that “disrespectful?” Maybe, but who cares? The Weise stuff is hilarious, and it’s more of a “we won’t take any guff” statement than anything else.

There’s an important game to be played Wednesday, and unless bad penalties are taken, manners will have nothing to do with it.

Read More: Brandon Prust, Mike Weaver,
Claude Julien: ‘I’d be very surprised’ if Dennis Seidenberg played Game 7 05.14.14 at 11:34 am ET
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There is virtually no shot that Dennis Seidenberg will be available to play in Wednesday’s Game 7 of the second round against the Canadiens, but it was a question worth asking in Claude Julien‘s press conference following the morning skate.

Seidenberg, who took contact Monday for the first time, was a participant in Wednesday’s morning skate. Considering he is working his way back from a torn ACL and MCL, you would think he would need at least a week’s worth of contact before he would even enter the discussion as a playing possibility.

Julien was asked if there was any chance that Seidenberg would play Wednesday, leading to the following exchange:

“Uh,” Julien said, pondering. “I don’t think so.”

“That’s not a ‘no,’” replied the reporter.

“I’d be very surprised,” said Julien.

Should the Bruins advance, Seidenberg could be a possibility at some point during the Eastern Conference finals or Stanley Cup final.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Dennis Seidenberg,
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