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Brad Marchand returns to Bruins practice 04.30.14 at 1:22 pm ET
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Brad Marchand was back at practice Wednesday after not taking part in Tuesday’s practice. Though he did not say why he was absent Tuesday, his voice was hoarse on Wednesday, suggesting he was ill.

With Marchand back at practice, Daniel Paille returned to the Merlot line after skating in Marchand’s place Tuesday. Wednesday’s lines and pairings were as follows:

Lucic – Krejci – Iginla
Marchand – Bergeron – Smith
Florek – Soderberg – Eriksson
Paille/Caron – Campbell – Thornton

Chara – Hamilton
Bartkowski – Boychuk
Krug – Miller

Dennis Seidenberg practiced again and did not take contact. Corey Potter remains absent after appearing to injure his shoulder last week in practice.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Source: Bruins-Canadiens to begin Thursday at TD Garden 04.29.14 at 6:08 pm ET
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The Bruins and Canadiens will begin their Eastern Conference semifinal series Thursday night at at 7:30 p.m. at TD Garden, according to a league source. Game 2 is expected to be played Saturday, with the likelihood that it will be a matinee.

RDS reported the schedule for the series earlier Tuesday, which falls in line with all of that information. According to RDS, the schedule is:

Game 1: Thursday, May 1, 7:30 p.m. at TD Garden
Game 2: Saturday, May 3, 12:30 p.m. at TD Garden
Game 3: Tuesday, May 6, 7 p.m. at Bell Centre
Game 4: Thursday, May 8, 7 p.m. at Bell Centre
Game 5: Saturday, May 10, TBD at TD Garden
Game 6: Monday, May 12, 7 p.m. at Bell Centre
Game 7: Wednesday, May 14, TBD at TD Garden

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Daniel Paille cleared to play, Bruins glad to have Dennis Seidenberg practicing 04.29.14 at 1:18 pm ET
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Bruins forward Daniel Paille said after Tuesday’s practice that he has been cleared to play after recovering from a suspected head injury.

Paille hit his head on the ice after a hit from Jake McCabe on April 12 and missed the entire first-round series against the Red Wings. Given that Paille had two concussions earlier in the season, he said Tuesday that the team was extra careful in bringing him back this time.

“Because it’s my third injury this year, there’s a lot more precautions to kind of rule out,” Paille said. “I believe I could have played midway through the series — I didn’t feel like I had too long of any symptoms/injuries — but there was a lot of precautions and I had to continue with that process.”

Paille began taking light contact last Thursday, but Tuesday’s practice saw him participate in battle drills. As for the notion that he could have been brought back sooner, Claude Julien said the Bruins simply followed protocol during the last round.

“I waited for the OK from our doctors. That’s basically what I waited for,” Julien said. “To say that he might have been ready, I needed to know that he was ready. I know he’s ready for the next round now.”

Paille practiced Tuesday on Patrice Bergeron‘s line in place of Brad Marchand, who did not practice. With Paille back, the assumption is that he will slide back into his old spot on the fourth line in place of Jordan Caron. Julien cautioned against assuming Paille is in the lineup just because he is cleared, but there is no doubt that Paille would be an asset against the speedy Habs.

“We’ll see where we are, guys,” Julien said. “The series hasn’t started yet and we haven’t made any decisions yet. Let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves here.”

Dennis Seidenberg also practiced Tuesday, but he did not take contact. Julien said that Seidenberg is skating with the team to prevent the “boredom” that comes from skating on his own each day. Seidenberg was initially ruled out for the season after tearing his ACL/MCL in late December, but he is well ahead of schedule in his recovery.

“It’s great to see. It gives you an emotional lift to see your teammate battling like he’s been battling just to be better,” Bergeron said. “Obviously he’s been doing that for a while. It’s nice to see him back out there, and obviously I don’t know what the timeline is there.”

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Dennis Seidenberg, Daniel Paille practice with Bruins 04.29.14 at 11:22 am ET
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The Bruins returned to practice Tuesday at TD Garden, with Daniel Paille and Dennis Seidenberg both participating. Chris Kelly, Corey Potter and Brad Marchand were all absent.

Paille, who has been cleared for contact since last Thursday, participated in battle drills and skated on Patrice Bergeron‘s line in place of Marchand. Seidenberg did not take contact.

Seidenberg skated on an extra pairing with Andrej Meszaros, with the rest of the lineup looking like this:

Lucic – Krejci – Iginla
Paille – Bergeron – Smith
Florek – Soderberg – Eriksson
Caron – Campbell – Thornton

Chara – Hamilton
Bartkowski – Boychuk
Krug – Miller

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Daniel Paille, Dennis Seidenberg,
Speed kills: Why the Bruins are annoyed with what you think of the Canadiens matchup 04.28.14 at 1:35 pm ET
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Peter Chiarelli is tired of the "speed" talk. (AP)

Peter Chiarelli is tired of the “speed” talk. (AP)

Bruins coach Claude Julien gets visibly annoyed when people talk about other teams’ speed being an issue for the Bruins, or the Bruins being too big and slow to hang with any squad with zip.

Turns out Peter Chiarelli does too.

After eliminating a fast team in five games, the Bruins once again face a speedy opponent in the Canadiens, and they’d like to be given a little more credit.

“It’€™s too [much of a] stereotype, and we’€™ve improved our speed,” Chiarelli said Monday. “I just hear about it all year, too, and obviously Claude and I talk, and we get tired of it. We have speed and we have heaviness and we have a little bit of a chip on our shoulder because of that, because of this label that we have. But fair enough. I understand where it’€™s coming from, I understand when you bring it up in the context of the Wings and now the Canadiens because they are — they’€™re both fast teams.”

Chiarelli traded away a lot of speed last summer when he shipped Tyler Seguin and Rich Peverley to Dallas, but the team has hardly turned into a bunch of cavemen on skates. The development of strong skaters on the back end in Dougie Hamilton, Torey Krug and Matt Bartkowski has actually made the Bruins a faster team in getting out of their zone and getting through the neutral zone.

Montreal is faster, to be sure, but the Bruins have quickness of their own to go with their physicality, which was seen throughout Boston’s five-game elimination of the Wings.

“It’€™s about closing gaps more quickly. It’€™s about establishing a forecheck and leaning on guys. It’€™s about our special teams,” Chiarelli said. “Both our PK and PP has been outstanding. We maintain that and we’€™re going to have success.”

Indeed they have. The Bruins scored six power-play goals in a series for the first time since 2010 in going 6-for-15 on the power play while holding the Red Wings to two goals on 20 Detroit power plays.

The biggest victim of the “Bruins are slow” narrative is Zdeno Chara, both literally and otherwise. The 6-foot-9 Norris finalist has never been a great skater, and the fact that he’s gotten up there in age and got injured late last postseason has painted the picture in some minds that he can be exposed. That’s yet to really happen though.

“We can’€™t really control what’€™s being said about us or maybe other teams, when they play us,” Chara said. “It’€™s more how we’€™re going to play and how we do things on the ice. I don’€™t think we are a slow team. Obviously we are built a certain way and we want to thrive on the way we’€™re built and excel in areas that we are good at, but I don’€™t think we are necessarily a slow team.

“I think we are able to skate and make quick transitions as well as any other team. I know what we can do it, and I believe that we can play with anybody.”

Said Chiarelli: “Despite the common belief that speed kills, I think we’€™ve shown that we have some speed and we have some size and we have experience. So it will be a challenge, but I think we’€™ll overcome that challenge.”

Read More: Peter Chiarelli, Zdeno Chara,
Bruins eliminate Red Wings, will face Canadiens next 04.26.14 at 5:53 pm ET
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Loui Eriksson scored his first postseason goal as a Bruin as the B's eliminated the Red Wings. (AP)

Loui Eriksson scored his first postseason goal as a Bruin as the B’s eliminated the Red Wings. (AP)

The Bruins eliminated the Red Wings with a 4-2 series-clinching Game 5 victory Saturday to set up an Eastern Conference semifinal series with the Canadiens.

Henrik Zetterberg made it interesting when he banged home the rebound off a Justin Abdelkader bid with 3:52 remaining to close what was a two-goal Bruins’ lead to one, but the Bruins held up the rest of the way and Jarome Iginla added an empty-netter to eliminate Detroit in five games.

Loui Eriksson scored his first power play goal as a Bruin when he beat Jonas Gustavsson in front for a power play goal 3:27 into the game while Justin Abdelkader was serving a hooking penalty. Gustavsson was playing a second straight game in place of regular starter Jimmy Howard, who the team said was dealing with the flu.

Boston’s lead held up until late in the second, when Pavel Dastyuk scored a power play goal at 14:41 of the period. From there a flurry of penalties called on both sides set up a Bruins’ four-on-three, with Zdeno Chara firing a slapshot past Gustavsson with 3.8 seconds remaining in the second.

Milan Lucic gave the B’s some breathing room by cashing in on a feed from Torey Krug in front 4:27 into the third. Krug had two assists on the day.

Earning the win was Tuukka Rask, who never let up more than two goals in a game this series. Rask ended up holding Detroit to six goals in five games with one shutout.

The Canadiens have awaited their next opponent since sweeping the Lightning on Tuesday. The teams last met in the postseason in the 2011 conference quarterfinals, with the Bruins eliminating Montreal in a seven-game classic en route to a Stanley Cup victory.

The conference semifinals will not begin until all other rounds are completed later next week.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- With a pair of power-play goals Saturday, the Bruins ended up scoring six goals on the power play in the series. That’s the most they’ve had in a series since they scored six on the man advantage against the Sabres in the 2010 Eastern Conference quarterfinals against the Sabres. They saw the light at the end of the tunnel all season (they had the third-best power play in the regular season) and can now officially say their days of having no power play in the postseason are behind them.

- As he was throughout the series, Rask was big for the B’s in the first two periods. His biggest saves of the second included a stop on Henrik Zetterberg when the Detroit captain wheeled around to fire a shot off a Dastyuk faceoff win and moments later, when he stopped Daniel Alfredsson on the doorstep.

- Dougie Hamilton once again had way too easy a time skating the puck into the zone on a power play as Darren Helm repeated his passive performance from Game 2. Hamilton scored off it in the first period Tuesday and it led Eriksson’s goal Saturday.

- For all the you-know-what spearing and occasional sleepiness, Lucic still ended up with solid numbers for the series (three goals) and finished especially strong with key goals in the final two games and a big shift on Jarome Iginla’s game-winning goal in Game 4.

- The Bruins didn’t end up missing Chris Kelly or Daniel Paille too much in the series. Justin Florek filled in admirably for Kelly on Carl Soderberg’s left wing, while Jordan Carl was both physical and smart throughout the series. Florek and Caron scored a goal apiece in the series.

Going forward, the guess would be that Paille, who has been skating and was cleared for contact Thursday, could be available when the next round starts. Kelly, who is out with a back injury, has not skated since late in the regular season.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

- The Bruins’ first line took two offensive zone penalties Saturday, and the second one cost them. David Krejci tripped Brendan Smith in the corner of the offensive zone in the first, but it was a high-sticking call against Milan Lucic in the second that gave Detroit the power play on which Datsyuk scored the equalizer.

In general, the penalties got out of hand when the officiating crew got whistle-happy throughout the second period. Lucic’s penalty was followed by a holding call against Danny DeKeyser, then a weak goalie interference call against Eriksson, a Johan Franzen holding penalty and finally a cross-checking call on Brendan Smith. Jarome Iginla drew two of the penalties that came during that three-minute stretch of penalty-calling madness.

It didn’t even end there, as Marchand was sent off for roughing in the opening minute of the third.

- Speaking of penalties, Shawn Thornton racks up the penalty minutes with all the fighting he does, but it’s rare that he takes a minor penalty. He had seven in the regular season, but with Saturday’s high-sticking penalty in the first period, he has now taken two minors this round.

Daniel Paille remains out for Game 5; no update on Corey Potter 04.26.14 at 2:01 pm ET
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Bruins forwad Daniel Paille skated again Saturday morning and will remain out of the lineup for Saturday’s Game 5 against the Red Wings.

Paille, who is recovering from what is believed to be a head injury, has not played since leaving the second-to-last game of the season two weeks ago. Claude Julien said that Paille, who has been taking contact in recent days, is getting to closer to a return, but is not yet ready.

Julien had no update on defenseman Corey Potter, who suffered a shoulder injury in Friday’s practice.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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