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Peter Chiarelli: Bruins not planning on trading Brad Marchand for Patrick Marleau or anyone else 06.13.14 at 9:39 am ET
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Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli told WEEI.com Friday morning that he has no plans to trade forward Brad Marchand. He also refuted a rumor from Thursday that the team was discussing a trade of the pesky forward for Sharks veteran Patrick Marleau.

“€œI have had no discussions for Marchand and I have no plans to trade him,” Chiarelli said. “I don’€™t make it a practice to respond to reports in the social media, but occasionally it is necessary.”

A veteran of four seasons, Marchand has three years left on a four-year, $18 million extension that contains a modified no-trade clause. His $4.5 million cap hit is fourth among Bruins forwards and sixth among Bruins players.

Marleau is not a logical fit for the Bruins given that they are looking to shed salary going forward rather than add it. In addition to Marleau being 34 years of age, his deal carries two more years of a $6.66 million cap hit and contains a no-movement clause.

The upside of adding a player like Marleau is that he is still productive at his age, as he had 33 goals for the Sharks last season, but making that expensive of a minor upgrade (Marchand had more goals than Marleau’s 17 in the 2013 season) in one spot on the top-six would make it even harder for the Bruins to re-sign Jarome Iginla, who is a free agent and led the Bruins in goals in both the regular season, when his 30 goals matched Patrice Bergeron‘s, and postseason.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Brad Marchand, Patrick Marleau, Peter Chiarelli,
Bruins report card: Forwards 06.10.14 at 4:15 pm ET
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As the Stanley Cup finals take place, the fact that the Bruins didn’t even reach the Eastern Conference finals after winning the Presidents’€™ Trophy further accentuates the failure that was their 2013-14 season. Here are the individual grades:

FORWARDS

Patrice Bergeron: A
Regular season: 80 GP, 30 G, 32 A, 62 PTS, plus-38
Postseason: 12 GP, 3 G, 6 A, 9 PTS, plus-1

Bergeron had the type of season that led Twitter to be insufferable over his candidacy for a video game cover, so that’€™s a good thing, I guess. This was Bergeron’€™s second career 30-goal season, and the fact that he scored 30 goals given that he never, ever cheats offensively, was pretty insane. He likely would have had more points than his 62 points had his linemates been more consistent early on.

Bergeron had nine points (three goals, six assists) over the first eight games of the playoffs, but he failed to register a point in the last four games against the Canadiens.

Jarome Iginla: A-
Regular season: 78 GP, 30 G, 31 A, 61 PTS, plus-34
Postseason: 12 GP, 5 G, 2 A, 7 PTS, even rating
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He hit 30 goals in the regular season, and while that thrilled Bruins fans, that’€™s what they should have expected from him. It took him a bit to start scoring regularly, but once he hit his stride, the Bruins’€™ first line had perhaps its most consistent regular season since David Krejci became the team’€™s No. 1 center. The Bruins will want to bring him back, but there’€™s no telling whether Iginla is willing to go year-to-year given that it’€™s the only way the Bruins can capitalize cap-wise on his status as a player over 35 years old.

Carl Soderberg: A-
Regular season: 73 GP, 16 G, 32 A, 48 P, plus-4
Postseason: 12 GP, 1 G, 5 A, 6 PTS, plus-4

It’€™s probably too early take positives from the season and apply them going forward, but Soderberg showed he can be one of the league’€™s better third-liners since he was moved to center. Considering Bergeron and David Krejci aren’t going anywhere, that’s where Soderberg will remain. He has one year left on his deal with a $1.083 million cap hit. If the 28-year-old takes another step forward in his second full NHL season, he’ll be due a sizable raise.

Reilly Smith: A-
Regular season: 82 GP, 20 G, 31 A, 51 PTS, plus-28
Postseason: 12 GP, 4 G, 1 A, 5 PTS, plus-5
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Don’€™t confuse his midseason slump with a complete collapse; Smith was one of the Bruins’€™ best players in the postseason. With even a little consistency down the stretch in the regular season, this would be an A+.

The Bruins coveted Smith when it came time to talk trade with the Stars, and they planned on him being a steady third-liner for them this season, but he claimed the second-line right wing job and raced out to a team-leading 18 goals in his first 52 games. Of course, scoring just two goals over the final 30 games wasn’t exactly top-six material. How much of that can be attributed to his midseason illness that caused him to lose weight is unknown, but with more consistency Smith can expect to push for 30 goals going forward.

Milan Lucic: B-
Regular season: 80 GP, 24 G, 35 A, 59 PTS, plus-30
Postseason: 12 GP, 4 G, 3 A, 7 PTS, plus-3

Lucic hit a goal-scoring rut in the middle of the season and he hit some of his opponents in the you-know-whats late in the season. That scoring slump saw Lucic score one goal over an 18-game stretch from Dec. 5 to Jan. 14, and without such a stretch Lucic could have pushed for 30 goals.

Daniel Paille: B-/C+
Regular season: 72 GP, 9 G, 9 A, 18 PTS, plus-9
Postseason: 7 GP, 1 G, 0 A, 1 PT, minus-1

He had three concussions this season, but he still played in 72 regular-season games. Paille’s the type of player who could figure to stick around if the Bruins decide to revamp their fourth line, as he has the speed that’€™s allowed the B’s to move him up in the lineup at points in addition to his penalty-killing duties.

Gregory Campbell: C
Regular season: 82 GP, 8 G, 13 S, 21 PTS, plus-1
Postseason: 12 GP, 0 G, 0 A, 0 PTS, even rating

The Bruins’ bottom-six –€“ particularly their fourth line — is supposed to be better than that of other teams, and it was a bad year for the Merlot Line. Campbell was a minus-3 in the Montreal series, with his line on the ice for the disastrous shift against Montreal’s fourth line in Game 7 that resulted in Dale Weise‘s first-period goal. The positive is that Campbell played all 82 games and 12 postseason games coming off a broken leg that ended last season in the Eastern Conference finals for him.  Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Brad Marchand, Jarome Iginla, Shawn Thornton,
Bruins report card: Defensemen/goaltenders 06.10.14 at 4:12 pm ET
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As the Stanley Cup finals take place, the fact that the Bruins didn’€™t even reach the Eastern Conference finals after winning the Presidents’€™ Trophy further accentuates the failure that was their 2013-14 season. Here are the individual grades.

DEFENSEMEN

Zdeno Chara: A-
Regular season: 77 GP, 17 G, 23 A, 40 PTS, plus-25
Postseason: 12 GP, 2 G, 2 A, 4 PTS, plus-4

The good: He was the best defenseman in the league in the regular season and was the most deserving Norris candidate, though the guess here is he’€™ll lose to Duncan Keith. The bad: He wasn’t himself in the last couple of games against the Canadiens, which cemented the fact that when Chara isn’t right, neither are the Bruins.

Torey Krug: A-/B+
Regular season: 79 GP, 14 G, 26 A, 40 PTS, plus-18
Postseason: 12 GP, 2 G, 8 A, 10 PTS, minus-2
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Krug gets this high a mark because he’€™s a bottom-pairing defenseman who gives the Bruins major production in offensive situation and on the power play. He’s also getting better in his own end. It will be interesting to see what kind of money Krug commands as a restricted free agent, as this was just his first full season in the NHL.

Dougie Hamilton: B+
Regular season: 64 GP, 7 G, 18 A, 25 PTS, plus-22
Postseason: 12 GP, 2 G, 5 A, 7 PTS, plus-1

When he was healthy, Hamilton made big strides in his second season. Paired with Chara on the Bruins’€™ shutdown pairing in the postseason, he had a ball against the Red Wings in the first round, but his Game 3 mental gaffe with P.K. Subban coming out of the penalty box was the low point of what was otherwise a very promising campaign from the 20-year-old.

Johnny Boychuk: B+
Regular season: 75 GP, 5 G, 18 A, 23 PTS, plus-31
Postseason: 12 GP, 1 G, 1 A, 2 PTS, plus-3

Know who loves playing for the Bruins? Johnny Boychuk. Know who’€™s in the prime of his career (30) and a really good right-shot defenseman who could command a ton of money if he hits free agency after next season? Johnny Boychuk. This could get interesting. The Bruins could either concede that they won’€™t be able to afford him by trading Boychuk this offseason or they can try to get a deal done with him before the season starts, the latter of which is Peter Chiarelli‘€™s usual plan of attack.

Kevan Miller: B+
Regular season: 47 GP, 1 G, 5 A, 6 PTS, plus-20
Postseason: 11 GP, 0 G, 2 A, 2 PTS, plus-2

He’€™s a young defenseman who isn’t immune to making mistakes, but he’s steady enough to play the Adam McQuaid role of third-pairing defenseman with a healthy dose of nasty. While Miller proved himself to be an NHL regular, his first taste of the playoffs wasn’t so swell, as his postseason will be remembered for his giveaway in Game 6 against the Canadiens that resulted in what would end up standing as the game-winning goal. The fact that he signed a two-year extension with an $800,000 cap hit might make him a better commodity than McQuaid going forward.

Dennis Seidenberg: B
Regular season: 34 GP, 1 G, 9 A, 10 P, plus-11
Postseason: DNP

Seidenberg was fine before he went down with a torn ACL/MCL, and you have to commend his effort to return to the lineup, which he would have done had the Bruins reached the Eastern Conference finals. He signed a four-year extension before the first game of the season.  Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Dougie Hamilton, Torey Krug, Tuukka Rask, Zdeno Chara
Bruins sign Linus Arnesson to entry-level contract 06.01.14 at 6:26 pm ET
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The Bruins announced Sunday that they have signed defenseman Linus Arnesson to an entry-level contract.

Arnesson, 19, was drafted in the second round (60th overall) of the 2013 draft, but was the Bruins’ first pick given that their first-rounder was dealt to the Stars in the team’s trade for Jaromir Jagr during the lockout-shortened 2013 season.

The 6-foot-1, 188 pound Sweden native spent last season playing for Djurgarden of the Allsvenskan league. Arnesson dressed in 44 regular-season games, scoring a goal and adding five assists while posting a plus-two rating. He also played for Team Sweden in the World Juniors.

Read More: Linus Arnesson,
Rangers eliminate Canadiens to advance to Stanley Cup finals 05.29.14 at 10:50 pm ET
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The Rangers eliminated the Canadiens in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals to advance to the Stanley Cup finals Thursday. Henrik Lundqvist stopped all 18 shots he faced in a 1-0 win for his first shutout of the postseason.

The Canadiens, who upset the Presidents’€™ Trophy-winning Bruins in the conference semifinals, played the final five games of the season with top goaltending prospect Dustin Tokarski in net after Carey Price was lost for the series after an injury suffered in Game 1 against the Rangers.

The upcoming series, which will played against either the 2012 Cup champion Kings or 2013 Cup champion Blackhawks, marks Lundqvist’€™s first trip to the Cup finals. The Rangers were last in the Cup finals in 1994, when they won the Stanley Cup in seven games over the Canucks.

It also marks a quick turnaround for a team that fired coach John Tortorella after last season and replaced him with former Canucks coach Alain Vigneault.

The Kings lead the Western Conference finals, 3-2, entering Friday’€™s Game 6.

Milan Lucic, Chris Kelly undergo surgery 05.23.14 at 1:23 pm ET
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Both Milan Lucic and Chris Kelly have undergone surgery for injuries suffered this season and are expected to be ready for the start of training camp, according to a statement released by Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli.

Lucic suffered a left wrist injury of Game 7 of the second round against the Canadiens, while Kelly missed the entire postseason with a herniated disk in his back.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Chris Kelly, Milan Lucic,
Cam Neely talks buyouts, fighting and Jarome Iginla’s future 05.20.14 at 2:40 pm ET
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Cam Neely, Jeremy Jacobs and Charlie Jacobs held a press conference Tuesday at TD Garden to wrap up media availability for the 2013-14 season.

Though little news emerged from the press conference, Neely did say that the team has not discussed using compliance buyouts on any of their players. Peter Chiarelli vowed not to use them last season, and Neely hinted the same might go for this offseason.

“We haven’€™t talked about that, no,” Neely said.

Teams are not allowed to buy out injured players, so even if the team wanted to buy out a veteran like Chris Kelly (two more years with a $3 million cap hit), the herniated disc that caused him to miss the playoffs could get in the way of such a move.

One thing discussed annually at these press conferences is the status of the team’s next practice facility, and Charlie Jacobs gave little update.

“We just had a meeting about our practice facility and [there are] a couple of different options,” Jacobs said. “[It's] best that I keep where we’€™re at right now a little close to the vest and say that we are moving along, and pursuing two distinct possibilities, both within 15 miles of the rink here.”

The two possibilities are believed to be the facility being built in Brighton next to the New Balance building and a potential facility that would be built next to the Garden.

Here are some of the other topics that were discussed:

- Neely wasn’t a fan of his team getting itself in hot water during the playoffs, such as on Milan Lucic‘s spear of Danny DeKeyser, Shawn Thornton squirting P.K. Subban with a water bottle and Lucic’s threats during the handshake line at the end of the second round.

“You don’€™t like to see that happen,” Neely said. “The stick work is something that, you know, now-a-days you just can’€™t get away with. There’€™s two referees, there’€™s all kinds of cameras, there’€™s reporters that tweet information out as soon as it happens. You can’€™t get away with certain things like you used to be able to do. The water bottle incident is something that as an organization you don’€™t like to see happen to be quite honest with you. Stick work happens, it’€™s not just our team that does it, it does happen. I can tell you this, in handshake lines there’€™s probably worse things that have been said that just don’€™t get public. In the history of handshake lines, I can almost guarantee that.”

- Neely defended the lack of movement at the trade deadline. The team tried trading for Alexander Edler, but that deal fell through and the team had to settle for Andrej Meszaros, a depth player who served mostly as a healthy scratch in the postseason.

“I can speak to what we tried to do at the deadline. Not in detail, but with what was available and how we thought we wanted to add as opposed to add and subtract, we thought we had something in place but it was predicated on another team making a deal and it didn’€™t pan out,” Neely said. “But again, we were going through that really good stretch of hockey and we thought we really just needed to add some depth and if a player with term became available, like the one we were trying to acquire, it would have been a bonus for us. But obviously I don’€™t think that is the full reason why we didn’€™t get past the second round, to be honest with you.”

- Jarome Iginla is the biggest name on the team set to hit free agency. Because of the cap penalties the team will have to pay for his one-year deal from last season, the Bruins’ best shot at keeping him is to get him to take another one-year, bonus-padded contract. Neely would like the player to return.

“I thought he started out a little slow when he came on, he came on late and he came on strong,” Neely said of Iginla. “Obviously he’€™s a leader, he’€™s the captain of another team for a long time and he came in and added in an element to our group, especially the forward group. He ended up scoring 30 goals which is not easy in this league anymore and we would like to try and see if we can figure something out moving forward with him. We will see where that goes but I thought he fit in really well with our team.”

- Neely didn’t say where things stand with Thornton, though he did echo Peter Chiarelli’s sentiments about there being less of a place in the NHL for fighters.

“I still believe that we like the physical game and physical play which at times leads to dropping the gloves,” Neely said. “But there’€™s always been a lot of talk, primarily with the media, about you know, ‘€˜is fighting still necessary in our game?’€™. I think with the way the game’€™s played and how it is played and how physical it is, I still feel it is still part of the game. But where it goes, you see from like 70s, 80s, 90s, it’€™s a little different or probably still trend that way, yes.”

Read More: Cam Neely,
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