Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Peter Chiarelli doesn’t expect ‘magic’ in draft 06.23.11 at 8:39 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said Thursday in Minnesota that he does not expect the team to do anything crazy movement-wise with the ninth overall pick in Friday’s draft. The team holds a top-10 pick for the second consecutive year thanks to the Phil Kessel trade. After selecting Tyler Seguin a season ago with the second overall pick, Chiarelli said he doesn’t envision the team picking that high again.

“I don’€™t think there will be any magic for us tomorrow,” Chiarelli said. “We’€™re picking nine, I’€™d say there’€™s, maybe after three or four, there’€™s a real good group of another eight, and there’€™s a good batch of defenseman, there’€™s a good batch of wingers and there’€™s a good batch of centermen. So we’€™re pretty content where we are and we’€™ll see where it goes. Oftentimes, players that you have ranked below your group go in and really good players drop and go last.”

Chiarelli said he doesn’t expect the player they take with the ninth pick to crack the lineup as a rookie, but noted that there’s always the possibility that an NHL-ready prospect could fall, a la Cam Fowler a season ago.

“You never say never about a player being able to play that’€™s drafted that low,” he said. “My guess is [the player won't make the team], to say no, just my knowledge of the players that I think will be available. There may be one that can play that may drop to us but that’€™s, you know, that would be a huge bonus and it’€™s just more about getting the right player and starting to develop him.”

The Bruins also have a high second-round pick, as they’ll choose 40th overall with Minnesota’s selection.

“I think it’€™s a fairly deep draft,” Chiarelli said. “… There’€™s no definitive number one and that runs deep through the first five or six I think. And you know I’€™d say it’€™s a good round and a half as far as guys that you’€™re excited to get these players, guys that you really feel strong with playing and maybe turning into something. I think it’€™s a good round and a half.”

The Bruins’ GM has spoken to the agent for Tomas Kaberle, but has not spoken with Michael Ryder’s agent. Kaberle and Ryder are both unrestricted free agents. He did confirm that Tuukka Rask will be getting knee surgery and that Milan Lucic will have his nose reset this offseason.

Read More: Peter Chiarelli,
Report: Tuukka Rask, Milan Lucic set for surgery 06.23.11 at 4:52 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

According to a pair of tweets from the Boston Globe’s Kevin Paul Dupont, Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask and forward Milan Lucic are set to have offseason surgery. Rask is expected to have minor knee surgery to clean up an cartilage issue that had plagued the second-year player throughout the team’s championship season, while Dupont tweets that Lucic will have nose surgery.

Lucic played late in the season and into the playoffs dealing with a sinus infection. He then broke his toe when a Tyler Seguin slapshot went off his foot in practice during the Eastern Conference finals. After leading the B’s with 30 goals in the regular season, Lucic finished tied for fifth on the team with five playoff goals.

Rask, who led the NHL with a 1.97 goals against average and a .931 save percentage in the 2009-10 season (his rookie campaign), lost the starting job to Tim Thomas this past season. In 29 games (27 starts), he went 11-14-2 with a 2.67 GAA and .918 save percentage.

Read More: Milan Lucic, Tuukka Rask,
Bruins to open season vs. Flyers 06.23.11 at 2:23 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

The NHL announced the 2011-12 regular-season schedule on Thursday. The Stanley Cup champion Bruins will kick off the season by raising their championship banner at TD Garden vs. the Flyers on Oct. 6.

The Bruins will then host the Lightning, the team they eliminated in the Eastern Conference finals, on Oct. 8. Their first meeting with the Canadiens will come on Oct. 27, when they host the Habs at the Garden.

The B’s will face the Canucks on Jan. 7 as the Western Conference champions will travel to Boston for the first time since the B’s defeated them in Game 6 of the Cup finals. The schedule will also feature a meeting of the past two Stanley Cup champions, with the B’s heading to Chicago to face the Blackhawks on Oct. 15.

The schedule is as follows:

Thu. Oct. 06 Philadelphia 7:00PM
Sat. Oct. 08 Tampa Bay 7:00PM
Mon. Oct. 10 Colorado 1:00PM
Wed. Oct. 12 At Carolina 7:30PM
Sat. Oct. 15 At Chicago 7:30PM
Tue. Oct. 18 Carolina 7:00PM
Thu. Oct. 20 Toronto 7:00PM
Sat. Oct. 22 San Jose 7:00PM
Thu. Oct. 27 Montreal 7:00PM
Sat. Oct. 29 At Montreal 7:00PM

Tue. Nov. 01 Ottawa 7:00PM
Sat. Nov. 05 At Toronto 7:00PM
Mon. Nov. 07 N.Y. Islanders 7:00PM
Thu. Nov. 10 Edmonton 7:00PM
Sat. Nov. 12 Buffalo 7:00PM
Tue. Nov. 15 New Jersey 7:00PM
Thu. Nov. 17 Columbus 7:00PM
Sat. Nov. 19 At N.Y. Islanders 7:00PM
Mon. Nov. 21 At Montreal 7:30PM
Wed. Nov. 23 At Buffalo 7:00PM
Fri. Nov. 25 Detroit 1:00PM
Sat. Nov. 26 Winnipeg 7:00PM
Wed. Nov. 30 At Toronto 7:00PM Read the rest of this entry »

Tim Thomas wins second Vezina Trophy 06.22.11 at 8:53 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Bruins goalie Tim Thomas was named the 2010-11 recipient of the Vezina trophy, awarded to the league’s top goaltender in the regular season.

Thomas beat Vancouver’s Roberto Luongo and Nashville’s Pekka Rinne for the trophy, winning it for the second time in the last three years. Thomas led the NHL with a .938 save percentage and a 2.00 goals against average. His save percentage is the best in a single season since the statistic began being recorded by the league.

Thomas is now the fifth goaltender to win the Vezina multiple times since 1982, when the criteria for the distinction switched from allowing the fewest regular-season goals to being the top regular-season goaltender.

When the regular season began, Thomas was not expected to be the team’s starter. Though he had won the Vezina in 2009, hip issues and a dip in performance saw him lose the starting job to Tuukka Rask down the stretch in the 2009-10 season. Rask started each game of the 2010 postseason as the Bruins were eliminated by the Flyers in the second round.

Thomas had offseason hip surgery, and when Rask allowed four goals in the team’s season-opening 5-2 loss to the Coyotes in Prague, coach Claude Julien gave Thomas the start the next night. Thomas shut out Phoenix in that Oct. 10 contest, and never relinquished the starting job or the league lead in GAA and save percentage.

Thomas is now the first Vezina-winner since 2003 (Martin Brodeur) to win the Stanley Cup in the same season. He is the first goalie since 1975 (Bernie Parent) to win the Vezina, Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe trophy in the same season, though at that time, the criteria for the Vezina was as listed above.

Read More: Tim Thomas, Vezina Trophy,
Zdeno Chara wins Mark Messier Leadership award, loses Norris 06.22.11 at 7:33 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

Red Wings defenseman Nicklas Lidstrom was named the 2011 recipient of the James Norris Memorial trophy at Wednesday’s NHL Awards in Las Vegas, edging out Bruins captain Zdeno Chara and Predators blueliner Shea Weber.

Lidstrom has now won the award, given to the league’s top defensive player, seven times in his career. Only Bobby Orr has won it more, as he achieved the honor eight times in his career.

Though Chara did not take home his second Norris trophy, he did win the Mark Messier leadership award. The award has only been around since the 2006-07 season, with Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby winning it last season.

While the Messier award isn’t anywhere near the Norris’ level, it is a good achievement for the Bruins’ captain. While he’s always been one of the most feared defensemen in the league, his qualities as a captain have often been overlooked due to his straight-laced, serious demeanor. Chara finally got his Cup, and now he’s getting his due.

Bruins year in review: Top rookie 06.22.11 at 3:09 am ET
By   |  5 Comments

Each day this week, WEEI.com will be taking a look back at the Bruins’€™ historic 2010-11 Stanley Cup Championship season. So far, we’ve looked at the goal of the year, fight of the year and save of the year. Up today is the Bruins’ rookie of the year, a no-brainer for anyone who followed the championship season.

BRUINS’ TOP ROOKIE

Brad Marchand: 21 G, 20 A, 41 points (regular season); 11 G, 8 A, 19 points (postseason)

“I was impressed with with Marchy from the moment I saw him play. I obviously wasn’t too familiar with him, but having seen him early in training camp’€¦ then just build his way up and keep getting better and better, to be honest with you, he was so important to our team. When we were successful, usually Marchy had a big game or played well.

“Playing with Marchy, I enjoyed it a lot’€¦ He deserves everything that he’s gotten. He’s worked for it. He had the opportunity. He made the team and he started with us and worked for his ice time. Rightfully so, he’s an important part of this team. To even do what he did in the playoffs, that’s even more important, and says more about him as a player that he can step up in those big games.”

Gregory Campbell

At the beginning of training camp, Tyler Seguin was a household name in Boston. He was perhaps the only Bruins rookie a Bostonian could pick out of the very lineup Seguin assured he had yet to crack. By the end of the Bruins’ Stanley Cup run, people were talking about a few Boston rookies. Seguin’s goals got him the hype and Adam McQuaid‘s mullet got him the cult following and customized t-shirts from Andrew Ference, but no Bruins rookie came close to bringing it the way Brad Marchand did.

When the B’s opened the regular season in Prague, Marchand was a fourth-liner who got around 10 minutes of ice time. When the season ended, he had assisted the game-winning goal in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals and scored two of his own. When all was said and done, Marchand hoisted the Cup having scored 11 goals in the postseason, one behind David Krejci for the postseason lead. He worked his way from being a famed member of the Merlot Line with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton to forming perhaps the team’s most consistent line with Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi, and aside from missing time after being rocked on a beautiful P.K. Subban hip check in December, the 5-foot-9 Marchand looked invincible in the process.

The story of Marchand’s preseason confidence has been well-documented. He told both Peter Chiarelli and Claude Julien that he would score 20 goals (the very number Milan Lucic was optimistically aiming for prior to the season) in his first full season. Chiarelli told him to think about what he was saying. While thinking may never be Marchand’s game, he certainly backed up his words by popping 21 in the regular season.

The downside with Marchand is that with the good, you must take the bad, but depending on how you look at it, the bad isn’t all that bad. He crosses the line often, whether it be with his on-ice actions or words. He was suspended for elbowing R.J. Umberger in the head, but at the end of the day he’s a far cry from a dirty player. He’s one of the Bruins who have been guilty of embellishment, but with Marchand, it’s nowhere near the point of some of the players the B’s saw in Montreal and Vancouver. If anyone wants to deem Marchand’s feistiness a problem, it’s a problem every team in the league would love to have. He’s a special type of player, and the B’s are fortunate to have someone who’s just as good in all three areas of the ice and at killing penalties as he is at getting under opponents’ skin and scoring goals.

Now, after a rookie year in which he became a hero in Boston, Marchand will get paid. A restricted free agent, Marchand couldn’t have asked for a better time to be due a raise, as it should be a big one. He had a salary cap hit of $821,667 last season and could now get upwards of $3 million.

Just a note before we get to the honorable mention section: While McQuaid was a far more mature player in his rookie campaign and provided far more stability than Seguin did (it’s an apples and oranges comparison anyway given the difference in age and position), the argument could be made that the B’s could have won the Stanley Cup without him. In this scribe’s opinion, the Bruins would not have won the Cup were it not for Tyler Seguin. The youngster may have singlehandedly changed the Eastern Conference finals with his performance in the second period of Game 2. As a result, if we had to make this thing a list, Seguin would be the runner up to Marchand.

HONORABLE MENTION: Tyler Seguin, Adam McQuaid

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Brad Marchand, Bruins Year in Review, Gregory Campbell
Max Pacioretty obviously upset Bruins won the Stanley Cup 06.22.11 at 12:01 am ET
By   |  36 Comments

Canadiens forward Max Pacioretty signed a two-year contract extension with the team this week, and upon signing told The Score that he could not watch the Bruins celebrate winning the Stanley Cup last week given that the Habs nearly eliminated the B’s in the Eastern Conference quarterfinals. Pacioretty did not play in the series, of course, as he missed the rest of the season after a March 8 hit into the stanchion at the Bell Centre from Zdeno Chara left him severely concussed and with a fractured vertebrae.

“I’m going to be dead honest with you, I actually turned the game off when I knew it was over. I didn’t want to see any of that,” Pacioretty said of the celebration. “Just knowing that that team won the Cup was definitely hard, because I know that we were so close to beating them.

“Maybe if we had a full roster, we would have beaten them. It’s unfortunate, but it’s given me a lot of motivation this summer, and I hope to use it to be strength and be able to do whatever it takes to get ready for next year and hopefully be the one lifting the Cup next year.”

Pacioretty’s recovery from his concussion has gone well, much like that of Nathan Horton, who was lost for the rest of the Stanley Cup finals in Game 3 on a head shot from Vancouver defenseman Aaron Rome. A host of the show asked the Habs forward a very leading question, seemingly to get him to call out Horton for embellishing much like Mark Recchi did of Pacioretty, but Pacioretty, who had tweeted his well-wishes for Horton at the time of the Rome hit, was just happy to see that his rival was OK.

“Concussions are a weird thing. Everyone’s brain is different, so it doesn’t matter really how hard you’re hit or how hard you’re knocked out for. Everyone’s brain reacts differently,” he said. “I think mine was similar to the case of Horton’s, where we were both unconscious for a long period of time but came back a couple days later and had no symptoms since. I hope the same for him and I would never say he embellished his injury at all. I know exactly what he’s going through and I hope a lot of fans out there are trying to realize the same thing now.”

As for Recchi’s and many people on Twitter’s reaction to him seeing a movie days after his concussion, Pacioretty still seemed a bit burned.

“It definitely shows the type of fans that Boston Bruins fans are,” Pacioretty said, “because I definitely still — I try not to look at it, but through Twitter I still get some pretty nasty stuff regarding embellishing injury, and it’s sad that people can actually think that way, especially after it happens to someone on their own team.”

The NHL reworded Rule 48, which focuses on hits to the head, on Tuesday. Pacioretty has made his thoughts on Chara’s hit very public, and was outwardly disappointed with the league when Chara was not suspended. He hasn’t let up on his line of thinking.

“It was definitely frustrating,” he said of the fact that Chara, who was tossed from the game, was not suspended. “It’s like what everybody really talks about. They’ve got to stay consistent with head shots. It might not be the same type of head shot as everyone else’s experiences, but everyone who plays hockey knows that that’s an illegal play. I mean, he got kicked out of the game, and it ended up with me having a broken neck and out for the season with a concussion as well, so I definitely would have liked to see something. That didn’t happen, but I hope down the road that they can clean up the game a bit and keep stuff like that out of it. Players don’t want to see it and fans don’t want to see it either. There’s definitely no place for it.

Read More: Max Pacioretty, Zdeno Chara,
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines