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James van Riemsdyk proud to be an American amidst bin Laden news 05.02.11 at 11:43 am ET
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Flyers forward James van Riemsdyk

PHILADELPHIA — The Flyers have a game to focus on Monday night, but the morning after it was learned that Osama bin Laden had been killed, Philadelphia forward and New Jersey native and former UNH Wildcat James van Riemsdyk couldn’t help but think back to what it was like as a youngster as the events of Sept. 11, 2001, unfolded.

“I remember exactly where I was when everything happened,” van Riemsdyk, 21, said Monday. “I remember being in middle school, sixth grade. I think I was at lunch at the time — that’s when we first found out — and they didn’t want to tell us what happened, but there were rumors going around the school, and then we got home. To see all the stuff that had happened, it was just a terrible thing. It was just a very tough time.

“There was a buzz about it, and I think right before I went home, we heard about what happened. I actually had a computer class, and they told us to stay off the Internet, but I was pretty eager and curious to see what happened and go on CNN.com to hear what had happened.”

A friend of van Riemsdyk’s lost his father in the terrorist attacks, as he was at the World Trade Center at the time, while two people from his home town of Middletown, N.J., also were killed.

“There was a big memorial in our town that they did a pretty nice job on,” van Riemsdyk said. “It definitely affected a lot of people close to me. … It was definitely a sad day. A lot of good people died that day, but it’s good that some justice finally came out of it now.”

The winger, who has represented the United States in international play in multiple competitions, including winning the gold with the U.S. under-18 team in 2006, said his father could see the events unfold from where he worked. Frans van Riemsdyk was one of the first people he spoke to Monday morning.

“They saw the second plane come cruising in,” he said. “They thought it was like an accident at first. No one knew what was going on, and then you see this plane take a direct course [toward the World Trade Center]. It was a pretty crazy thing.”

A day after chants of “USA” broke out at Citizens Bank Park during Sunday night’s Phillies-Mets game, JVR can only imagine what the atmosphere will be like for the Flyers’ pregame tradition of “God Bless America,” a duet sung by Lauren Hart with a video of the late Kate Smith.

“The fans and the atmosphere should be great for that part of the game,” van Riemsdyk said. “It’s a proud day in our history, you could say now, is the day that this guy was brought to justice. At that point last night, I know hockey was put on the back burner for a second there when you kind of think of all the things that have been affected and all the people close to you that maybe lost someone. It’s obviously a good thing that all this came to justice last night.”

Read More: James Van Riemsdyk, Osama Bin Laden,
Bruins looking for positives as results continue to escape power play 05.01.11 at 6:09 pm ET
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Claude Julien might be happy winning, but he can't smile about the power play. (AP)

PHILADELPHIA — The Bruins’ power play struggles have gone from concerning, to laughable, to just being a sensitive subject. An 0-for-26 showing in the playoffs will do that, but right now the B’s are simply looking for signs of progress.

“We’re just trying,” Zdeno Chara said after Sunday’s practice at Wells Fargo Center. “We’re always trying to get better. We’re still working on it, and I thought we created some better scoring opportunities yesterday. Hopefully it happens sooner rather than later.

“We controlled the puck pretty well, made some plays, had some quality shots. We had some power plays where we got in really easily, and we had some of them where we couldn’t really get past the blue line. It’s just a little inconsistent on that part.”

The Flyers, who killed off all five of the Bruins’ power plays in Boston’s 7-3 Game 1 victory Saturday, boasted a middle-of-the-pack penalty kill unit in the regular season. Their 82.7 penalty kill percentage was 15th in the NHL, though in the first round against the Sabres, they gave up seven goals on 31 Buffalo power plays, meaning they were successful only 77 percent of the time. Against a team that’s struggled as much on the man advantage, it doesn’t seem to matter how the Flyers’ PK operates.

“No results,” Claude Julien said Sunday of the team’s power play. “That’s one thing, but I thought there was a few things better. Hopefully it continues to get that way, but we just need it going.”

The Bruins will make their latest attempt at breaking the unflattering streak Monday night in Game 2.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Zdeno Chara,
Danny Briere wishes Zdeno Chara would be more careful with his stick 05.01.11 at 3:43 pm ET
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Danny Briere recovers after taking a Zdeno Chara stick to the face. (AP)

PHILADELPHIA — Flyers forward Danny Briere isn’t about to put up a stink over a missed call in the Bruins’ 7-3 Game 1 victory over Philadelphia Saturday. Speaking with reporters after Sunday’s practice, Briere said he didn’t think Zdeno Chara meant any harm when he got him with a stick to the face in front of the net during the third period, but that it could have been avoided.

“I don’t think it was intentional,” Briere told reporters Sunday. “He was battling with someone else in front of the net, but the thing with him is that every time he battles he always has his stick is always in the air. At the size he has, I don’t think he needs to do that. You are supposed to be in control of your stick. But it happened, [and] like I said, it wasn’t intentional on his part.”

Briere said Chara’s stick got him on the right side of his head. No penalty was called on the play, though the Bruins did take five penalties in the third period.

The 33-year-old Briere had the Flyers’ first goal of the game Saturday, beating Tim Thomas to tie the game at a goal apiece in the first period. He leads all postseason skaters with seven goals in the playoffs thus far.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Danny Briere, Zdeno Chara,
Marc Savard texting Claude Julien pointers from afar 05.01.11 at 3:11 pm ET
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Marc Savard may not be on the ice, but he's still got some tips for Claude Julien. (AP)

PHILADELPHIA — There’s been no sign of Marc Savard since he sat at a podium, choked up, as general manager Peter Chiarelli announced the center’s season was finished on Feb. 7 at TD Garden. The 33-year-old returned to his home in Peterborough, Ontario, and since then, neither Bruins fans nor the media have heard a peep from the center. They’ve heard about him, as he reportedly has dealt with memory issues, but have gotten nothing from the horse’s mouth.

On Sunday, Claude Julien touched on the contact that he’s had with Savard since he was shut down due to post-concussion syndrome. Text-messaging has kept the two in touch, with Savard even trying to help his boss call the shots at times.

“I’ve been texting back and forth with Marc, no doubt. For me personally, there’s the player and then there’s the individual. I care for him as an individual and I really hope that he gets better for the ask of his personal life,” Julien said after Sunday’s practice. “I’ve been texting to see how he’s doing, and every once in a while I’ve said, ‘I thought you were going to text me to give me some tips on certain parts of our game.’ As soon as I opened that door, he took advantage of it. I’ve gotten a few tips from him.”

One area in which Savard should be instructing Julien is the power play. The B’s are 0-for-26 thus far in the postseason, and Julien admitted Sunday that the unit’s performance might not be so bleak if they still had a healthy Savard.

“He was a guy that did such a good job on the power play,” Julien said. “We definitely miss him there, and that’s not a big secret. The way he was just poised and playing those areas, where to move the puck, it certainly created some awareness for the other team. They knew how dangerous he was. That’s a part where, yeah, we lost that part when we lost Marc Savard. It’s not a part that’s easily replaceable.

“Somehow we’ve got to find a way to improve our power play without Marc Savard. It’s been a challenge, but even Marc this year was not as good a player as he was before that major injury of his, and I still remember the first few years I had him. You couldn’t have asked for a better power play guy. When you lose a guy like that, you’re losing a real good player and a real good piece of your power play.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Marc Savard, Peter Chiarelli
Rivet, rivet: Bruins say broken skate the reason for Nathan Horton’s absence 05.01.11 at 2:42 pm ET
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PHILADELPHIA — Nathan Horton wasn’t on the ice as the Bruins held their Sunday practice at Wells Fargo Center, but his never-ending grin could still be seen in the team’s dressing room following the skate. Horton did only off-ice work Sunday, with he and the team explaining that it was an equipment issue that led to his absence. Horton, who famously went to a local sporting goods store to buy a stick during a prolonged scoring slump in the regular season, apparently realized he had a broken skate as he was getting ready for the practice. By the time it was realized, Horton said, coach Claude Julien told him not to bother worrying about the practice.

“His rivets popped just before going out there, so the trainer came to see me, and I said we were only going out there for 20 minutes, so by the time you get it fixed [it wouldn't be worth it],” Julien said after practice. “He did a little off-ice workout, and it’s not a big deal. He’ll skate tomorrow morning.”

Horton led the Bruins with five shots on goal in Boston’s 7-3 win over the Flyers in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. The 25-year-old had a goal and an assist for two points and was a plus-3 on the day. Through eight playoff games, Horton has five points and a plus-2 rating.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Nathan Horton,
Patrice Bergeron knows Flyers ‘will bounce back’ 04.30.11 at 7:02 pm ET
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Patrice Bergeron (AP)

PHILADELPHIA — The Bruins began the Eastern Conference semifinals by lighting up Brian Boucher and the Flyers to the tune of a 7-3 Boston victory Saturday. Boucher allowed five goals before being pulled in the second period, and though it marked the fourth time this postseason that the Flyers have had to make a goaltending change mid-game, the Bruins know better than to expect things to come that easy.

“Philly’s known for their comebacks, even within games, so you’ve always got to be on your toes,” Tim Thomas, who gave up three goals on the other end, said after the contest.

With the victory, the Bruins lead the series, 1-0, but won’t get ahead of themselves. The B’s had a 3-0 series lead a season ago before the Flyers won the final four contests to eliminate Boston.

“It’s only one game, and yeah, they will bounce back,” Patrice Bergeron, who had three assists in the victory, said. “We’re going to make sure we’re ready for that.”

Game 2 will be played Monday night at Wells Fargo Center.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brian Boucher, Patrice Bergeron, Tim Thomas
David Krejci, Bruins beat Flyers in Game 1 04.30.11 at 5:54 pm ET
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PHILADELPHIA — The Bruins began the Eastern Conference semifinals on a positive note, chasing Flyers goaltender Brian Boucher in the second period and taking a 7-3 victory at Wells Fargo Center Saturday.

David Krejci and Brad Marchand each had a pair of goals, with Nathan Horton, Mark Recchi and Gregory Campbell picking up tallies for the Bruins. The first five of the Bruins’ goals came against Boucher, who was pulled at 17:14 of the second period after allowing Marchand’s first goal. The rookie winger picked up his second of the night by beating Sergei Bobrovsky at 14:59 of the third, and Campbell scored his first career playoff goal at 17:39.

Danny Briere, James van Riemsdyk and Mike Richards scored for the Flyers. Tim Thomas made 31 saves on the day.

The teams will play Game 2 in Philadelphia on Monday before heading to Boston to play Games 3 and 4.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- Things sure are pretty when the first line gets first-line results. Krejci had just one point — his Game 3 goal — in the seven-game series vs. the Canadiens, and his four-point performance went a long way for the B’s Saturday. The B’s are still waiting to get more out of Milan Lucic, who did not have a point on the day, but his linemates certainly cashed in. Horton now leads the team with four postseason goals.

- The Flyers got some rough goaltending out of Boucher, and that’s obviously something the Bruins would welcome as a series-long trend. Boucher allowed five goals on 23 shots before being yanked, and some of the Bruins’ goals were very soft. Recchi got his own rebound before letting an easy one trickle underneath Boucher for Boston’s third goal, while Boucher knocked Horton’s goal into his own net while trying to stop it. Some goals, such as Krejci’s second, came as the result of traffic in front of the net, but it was just a bad showing for Boucher for the most part.

Saturday’s contest marked the fourth time in eight games this postseason that the Flyers have changed goalies during a game. Goaltending was an interesting topic before the series given that the B’s hold the clear advantage, so we’ll see if suspect Philadelphia netminding ends up playing a bigger role than we may have initially thought.

- The success continues for Patrice Bergeron. The second-line center was Boston’s best player in the conference quarterfinals vs. the Canadiens, and he had three assists on Saturday. The 25-year-old made a very nice play in redirecting an Andrew Ference shot from the point that would lead to Marchand’s goal off a rebound.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

- Pretty soon we’re going to have to change it to “What went wrong (aside from the power play not scoring) for the Bruins.” The B’s couldn’t bury one on any of their power plays, even when a shaky Boucher was in net for the first three. They finished 0-for-5 on the night and are now 0-for-26 in the playoffs. Yeesh.

- Sure, it was 5-1 at the time, but the Bruins allowed James van Riemsdyk’s second-period tally at a dicey time. Marchand had scored 16 seconds earlier to chase Boucher from the game, so the goalie change followed by the quick goal could have given Philadelphia a bit of a spark had they kept it up. Fortunately for the Bruins, they didn’t.

- Saturday marked only the second time since Game 2 of the first round that Chris Kelly’s line failed to produce a point. Peverley had a three shots on goal, but Ryder and Kelly combined for just one on the day. Kelly’s line was very good for the Bruins after the first couple games vs. Montreal, and the Bruins can only hope they get big production once again this round.

- The Bruins took four power plays in the first 13 minutes of the third period, and it finally paid off when Mike Richards ripped a wrist-shot past Thomas with just under seven minutes remaining in the contest. Sure, both teams in this series have bad power plays, but the B’s can’t assume the Flyers’ is as bad as theirs.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Danny Briere, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron
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