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What will Tyler Seguin get in his next contract? 09.07.12 at 6:23 pm ET
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While the Bruins may not be playing any time soon, Peter Chiarelli made a strong play Friday by signing Brad Marchand to a four-year, $18 million a year before he was set to become a restricted free agent. While Marchand’s signing crosses a name off a list of important players set to become RFAs (Tuukka Rask, Tyler Seguin and Milan Lucic), the most interesting case remains that of Seguin.

Chiarelli doesn’t like to see players get to free agency, and in Marchand’s case he made sure he locked up a player set to become a restricted free agent before he could step onto the ice in the final year of his deal. Last season, Chiarelli locked up a player set to become a restricted free agent when he gave David Krejci a three-year, $15.75 million contract during the season. He admitted that to be his style Friday, but he wouldn’t comment on whether he intends to sign Seguin before the season starts.

All Chiarelli said Friday was that he has “had some discussions” with the other Bruins that are near the end of their deals. While we don’t know when or for how much Seguin will sign, here’s what we do know: At 20 years old, he led the Bruins with 29 goals and 67 points and he has yet to reach his prime.

Furthermore, three signings have set the bar for what he may command. Taylor Hall, the player picked one spot ahead of Seguin in the 2010 draft, signed this summer for seven years at $6 million per. Fellow Oiler Jordan Eberle got the same cap hit for six years, while Hurricanes winger Jeff Skinner (the seventh overall pick in 2010) signed a six-year deal that will carry a $5.75 million cap hit. All three players, like Seguin, are entering the final seasons of their entry-level deals.

Here are the stats of all four players from last season, with the exception of Skinner, whose rookie (his best year) stats are shown:

Eberle: 78 GP, 34 G, 34 A, 76 P, 17:36 AVG. TOI
Hall: 61 GP, 27 G, 26 A, 53 P, 18:13 AVG. TOI
Skinner [2010-11]: 82 GP, 31 G, 32 , 63 P, 16:44 AVG. TOI
Seguin: 81 GP, 29 G, 38 A, 67 P, 16:56 AVG. TOI

Chiarelli admitted Friday that the sides do take into consideration the comparables, and in Seguin’s case it would appear the comparables are there.

“Again, I’€™m not going to go into details of negotiations,” he said. “You look at comparable players, you look at where your team salary structure is, and you look at the market. You don’€™t look strictly at one of those things – you try and look at all of them. So we try and do that in all our negotiations, and we will continue to do that. Sometimes you’€™re faced with different dynamics, and you have to make decisions at certain junctures of the negotiation, but generally speaking the comparables are important, comparable peer groups, and where he fits into the team salary structure.”

If Seguin were to get the lowest cap hit of the trio — Skinner’s $5.75 million — he would become the Bruins’ highest-paid forward, ahead of the likes of Krejci ($5.25 million) and Patrice Bergeron ($5 million). Seguin brings something that neither of those two players bring with his elite scoring touch, but he plays less than the other two (Bergeron and Krejci averaged 18:35 and 18:25 per game last season, respectively), and unlike the Oilers stars and Skinner, is playing on a recent Stanley Cup champion team that is crowded with capable veterans.

For example, the Bruins have five forwards (including Marc Savard) who are set to command cap hits of $4 million or more next season. The Oilers have two, while the Hurricanes are three. The Bruins also have the highest payroll in the NHL right now, so money may be tight when it comes time to get all of their players — including a guy like Rask who could be due for a raise from the $3.5 million he’s set to earn — signed before the 2013-14 season.

Because the whole Phil Kessel thing didn’t work out, it’s yet to be seen just how much the Bruins are willing to shell out for elite scorers. It will be interesting to see how things unfold for Seguin and the Bruins.

Read More: Tyler Seguin,
New CHL/NHL transfer agreement could allow Dougie Hamilton to play in OHL and NHL 09.07.12 at 3:42 pm ET
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While the Bruins announced some bad news regarding a potential lockout Friday by canceling their rookie camp, they have gotten some good news when it comes to having their top prospect in the 2012-13 season.

General manager Peter Chiarelli said that the NHL and CHL are in talks regarding a new transfer agreement that would allow players to start a locked out season with their junior clubs and then go to the NHL mid-season if there is to be a season. Chiarelli said he is unsure of how many players the B’s would be able to take back, but he said defenseman Dougie Hamilton would be their priority.

Because there had been no precedent set in the previous lockout (the season was cancelled rather than starting late), teams and players were unsure as to whether junior-eligible players (under 20 years old; Hamilton is 19) could start the season with their junior teams and then jump to the NHL. It appears now that they most likely will be able to, though it is not yet official and just how many players can do so remains unknown.

“We’€™re told they’€™re working on an agreement, and we’€™re told that there will be the ability to take players, in the event of a work stoppage, and it cutting into the CHL [Canadian Hockey League] season,” Chiarelli said. “There will be some type of ability to take players from their respective CHL teams. So, I’€™m hoping that that will be finalized, but at the very least I’€™m told that it’€™s expected to happen in the agreement. So, I mean, to the extent – I don’€™t know how many we can take, and I know that they haven’€™t done the agreement yet, but they’€™re working on it. So yes, if we can take one, I can tell you that [Hamilton] will be the one.”

Read More: Dougie Hamilton,
Bruins cancel rookie camp 09.07.12 at 3:38 pm ET
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The Bruins have cancelled their upcoming rookie camp and tournament due to CBA uncertainty, general manager Peter Chiarelli said Friday.

The camp was expected to open on Sept. 14, one day before the expiration of the current collective bargaining agreement. The team has not made any changes regarding their training camp, which is set to open on Sept. 21, and they plan to have select players who would have participated in rookie camp in attendance.

Brad Marchand gets four-year extension from Bruins 09.07.12 at 1:01 pm ET
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The Bruins announced Friday that they have signed forward Brad Marchand to a four-year contract extension with an annual salary cap hit of $4.5 million.

Marchand, 24, is entering the final year of a $5 million two-year deal he signed prior to last season. With Marchand locked up, the Bruins’ list of free agents following next season include restricted free agents Milan Lucic, Tyler Seguin, Jordan Caron and Tuukka Rask. Nathan Horton and Andrew Ference will be unrestricted free agents.

The 2006 third-round pick posted career-highs in goals (28) assists (27) and points (55) last season. He was second to only Seguin in Bruins goals in 2011-12. A surprise 21-goal-scorer as a rookie in 2010-11, Marchand added 11 more goals in the playoffs during the Bruins’ Stanley Cup run.

In addition to his speed, two-way play and penalty kill contributions, Marchand is known for his feisty play and tendency to get under opponents’ skin and has thus been suspended twice by the league. He was given two games in 2010-11 for elbowing R.J. Umberger in the back of the head, but his most notable punishment from the league was a five-game suspension for a low-bridge hit on Sami Salo last January against the Canucks.

Even prior to the Marchand signing, Seguin has been the most intriguing of the Bruins’ upcoming free agents. The B’s have only two $5 million forwards (David Krejci and Patrice Bergeron), but with the likes of Jordan Eberle, Taylor Hall and Jeff Skinner signing long-term deals with annual average values of $6 million or in the neighborhood ($6 for both Eberle and Hall, $5.725 for Skinner), it would appear the 20-year-old Seguin is due for a hefty pay raise.

Read More: Brad Marchand,
Bruins announce entry-level deal for Malcolm Subban 09.06.12 at 2:56 pm ET
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The Bruins announced Thursday that they have signed first-round pick Malcolm Subban to a three-year entry-level contract.

The deal will not begin until Subban turns pro, something that the 18-year-old netminder figures to be a ways away from doing. Given that goaltenders take longer to develop, it could be three or four years until Subban reaches the NHL.

Subban, the brother of Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban and top prospect (and Belleville Bulls teammate) Jordan Subban, had a 2.50 goals-against average and .923 save percentage in 39 regular-season OHL games last season. He was selected 24th overall by the Bruins in June’s draft.

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Bruins announce national TV schedule 08.30.12 at 4:52 pm ET
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The Bruins on Thursday announced their national television schedule for the upcoming season, something that obviously depends on when the season actually starts.

Starting with the first game of the season (Oct. 11 against the Flyers), the Bruins will have select games broadcast on the NBC Sports Network, while the first NBC game is the annual “Thanksgiving Showdown,” which they play the Friday after Thanksgiving. This season, the B’s will host the Rangers on Black Friday.

Following is the Bruins’ national TV schedule:

Bruins games broadcast on NBC Sports Network:
Thursday, Oct. 11, at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 27, vs. New Jersey, 7 p.m. (non-exclusive)
Monday, Dec. 10, at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. (non-exclusive)
Wednesday, Jan. 9, at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 13, at New York Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 29, vs. St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 4, at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 6, vs. Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, March 4, vs. Montreal, 7:30 p.m. (non-exclusive)
Wednesday, March 27, vs. Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 10, at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.

Bruins ‘€œflex’€ game on NBC Sports Network:
Sunday, March 31, at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.

Bruins Games Broadcast on NBC (all times Eastern):
Friday, Nov. 23, vs. New York Rangers, 1 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 17, at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.

Bruins ‘€œflex’€ games on NBC:
Sunday, March 10, at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 17, at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 13, at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. (non-exclusive)

Players want to distribute list of divers, which is hilarious 08.23.12 at 11:53 am ET
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One of the topics discussed at Wednesday’s rule enforcement meeting in Toronto was one of the most maddening acts in the game: diving.

According to a report from NHL.com, the players attending the session — a group that included Jason Spezza, Kevin Bieksa and John-Michael Liles — “led an impassioned discussing on enforcing” Rule 64.1, which is the rule against diving/embellishment.

The players had an interesting idea, proposing that a list of “divers” can be distributed throughout the NHL so every team’s dressing room can have it and so officials can see it before each game.

While that’s a nice idea in theory, it gets a roll of the eyes from this scribe. Diving, embellishment or whatever you want to call it happens with every team, so that would be one hell of a list. Sometimes it’s more outrageous than others, but diving happens. Maybe it can go away with more discipline, but I’m not counting on it.

For example, Kevin Bieksa is leading the charge against divers? Bieksa committed perhaps the worst dive of the 2011 playoffs — and P.K. Subban certainly had some candidates in the first round — in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals in order to get a high-sticking call on Mark Recchi. But it happens. Andrew Ference did pretty much the same thing to get a call on Mason Raymond in the same series.

How much would a list really accomplish? Does any referee go into a Canadiens game unaware that Subban has been known to embellish calls?

Honest players do it and dishonest players do it. As much as fans want to think it only occurs with whichever team the home team is playing, diving is ubiquitous. Maybe it won’t be some day, but it’s prevalent enough these days for this “list” idea to seem laughable.

Read More: Kevin Bieksa, P.K. Subban,

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