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Dougie Hamilton named OHL defenseman of the month 11.03.11 at 4:11 pm ET
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To the surprise of nobody, Dougie Hamilton, the Bruins’ first-round pick from June’s draft, has been named OHL defenseman of the month for October. The 18-year-old got off to an absolutely ridiculous start to his third season with the Niagara IceDogs, racking up 20 points (seven goals, 13 assists) in 12 games in the first month of the season.

Now 14 games into the season, Hamilton has 23 points (seven goals, 16 assists) on the season. Hamilton caught up with a couple of weeks ago to discuss the blueliner’s impressive start to the season (click here for that piece).

“I’€™m getting good opportunities,’€ Hamilton said. ‘€œOur power play is doing really well. I think just coming back from camp with extra confidence and playing with those guys makes you better. I think I came back with confidence, and I think I got better over the summer as well. The opportunity, confidence and my development has helped a lot.’€

Sarnia winger Nail Yakupov, the top prospect in the coming draft, was named player of the month after compiling 29 points (11 goals, 18 assists) in 13 games. Sorry, Bruins’ fans — the B’s are only on pace for the second-worst record.

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Practice notes: More maintenance for Rich Peverley, Dennis Seidenberg 11.03.11 at 1:27 pm ET
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For the second straight day, Rich Peverley and Dennis Seidenberg were the only two players missing from Bruins practice. Coach Claude Julien said after the skate that the past two days have simply been maintenance days for the two players, and that he expects both players to be good for Saturday’s game in Toronto.

The forward lines Thursday remained the same as they were on Wednesday. They were as follows:

Milan LucicDavid KrejciNathan Horton

Brad MarchandPatrice BergeronTyler Seguin

Benoit Pouliot – Chris Kelly – Jordan Caron

Daniel PailleGregory CampbellShawn Thornton

Here are a few notes from the practice:

– The B’s got some power play work in before practice, as Zdeno Chara, Joe Corvo, Andrew Ference, David Krejci, Nathan Horton, Milan Lucic, Tyler Seguin, Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and Chris Kelly spent upwards of 20 minutes prior to practice down at one end working on the man advantage.

– With those guys working on the PP, the other end saw Adam McQuaid, Steven Kampfer and Jordan Caron doing some power skating with ice wizard Besa Tsintsadze. The power-skating coach got the three players’ feet moving, so much so, in fact, that McQuaid blew a tire and went crashing into the boards. Unfortunately for McQuaid, that isn’t anything new.

Horton had some fun with the media Thursday. A day after he spoke for the first time in nearly two weeks and was asked why he has not made himself available to the press this season, Horton was sitting at his stall and declared, “I’m ready!” After greeting the reporters, Horton sarcastically said, “See? Nobody wants to talk to me.”

Read More: Besa Tsintsadze, Dennis Seidenberg, Rich Peverley,
Tyler Seguin shooting a ton, but feels he can do more 11.02.11 at 8:55 pm ET
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Tyler Seguin has been able to bring more to the table offensively as a second-year player. Through 11 games, he has 11 points (four goals, seven assists), which both leads the Bruins and is half of his point total from his rookie season.

Seguin assisted Patrice Bergeron‘s second-period goal in Tuesday’s win over the Senators, but he had a few questionable plays in the first period. The most notable of those plays was one in which he beat a defenseman at the blue line and passed up a breakaway for an attempted drop-pass. The play resulted in a turnover and left anyone watching wondering why he didn’t shoot on the play.

‘€œYeah, I do think that I need to shoot more,” Seguin acknowledged Wednesday at TD Garden. I remember there was one play ‘€“ I don’€™t remember if it was in the first or second last night ‘€“ I went down on the D and kind went one way and cut back the other way and when I watched the replay, I almost had a clear breakaway but I decided to pass. For whatever reason, my first instinct is always to try and look back but I know I’€™ve got to stop maybe being too fancy and just put pucks to the net. I know I’€™ve seen myself, when I shoot more, being rewarded. I think I’€™ve got to continue doing that and not give away good shots.’€

The long-beaten-to-death topic of wing vs. center with Seguin comes into play in such a case, as he admitted Wednesday that because he is a natural center, his instinct is to distribute the puck rather than shooting it himself. At any rate, Seguin is still shooting way more than he did last season. The 19-year-old is on pace for over 268 shots on gaol this season, as he’s averaged more 3.27 shots on on gaol per game through the first 11 contests and is second only to Bergeron (39). Last season, Seguin put 131 pucks on net in 74 games.

Bruins coach Claude Julien also wished that Seguin shot the puck on that first period play Tuesday, but he didn’t fault the youngster for the decision he made.

“In that case, you probably wish he would have taken it to the net and maybe even drawn a penalty on that because he had half a step, but you’ve got to also realize that those two players behind him were kind of open and a guy like him is a really good playmaker,” Julien said. “You don’t want to be too hard on those kinds of decisions.”

Read More: Tyler Seguin,
Benoit Pouliot feeling better, hopes to play better 11.02.11 at 2:54 pm ET
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Benoit Pouliot has been back on the ice for a few days now, but it’s probably too early to say he was a healthy scratch Tuesday against the Senators.

Pouliot, who was sick, first missed practice on Friday due to an illness, and he did not travel with the B’s to Montreal for Saturday’s game. He returned to practice Monday, took part in Tuesday’s optional morning skate with the scratches and did not play Tuesday. It was unknown at the time whether Pouliot was sitting as a healthy scratch or whether he still wasn’t ready. Asked Wednesday, the 25-year-old said it was the latter.

“Personally, no,” Pouliot said when asked whether he was healthy enough to play. “I didn’t feel right and I gotta get some reps in and the cardio in and feel better. When you’re not doing much, you use everything and I just gotta get back on track and I feel good.”

The Bruins will next play Saturday in Toronto. That’s a good thing for Pouliot, who will take all the days he can get as he works to get his legs and conditioning back. He said he first started to feel under the weather during the week last week and felt especially bad during Thursday’s game against the Canadiens.

“It was tough. it was a long one,” Pouliot said. “Just a bad cold but couple days now, I feel much better and hopefully it was on the right track. A bunch of things just kept me from doing much. I’ve been sleeping a lot and hanging out on my couch, but it’s better.”

Pouliot is the only skater on the Bruins’ roster to not have a single point this season. He’s missed three of the team’s 11 games (he was a healthy scratch in the season-opener), but he isn’t getting down on himself yet.

“Obviously the points and the stats aren’t there, I think everyone knows that,” he said. “But I think the way I am working and trying to figure out the systems and everything, I think I’m on the right track. I am doing as much as I can and working as hard as I can and if you work hard enough, things will fall into good places. It’s just a matter of getting a point and getting back the confidence and everything should be good.”

While he’s focused on producing more than he has, a lot of Pouliot’s focus has been on fitting into the system here in Boston. The former fourth overall pick is now in with his third different organizations in the last four years, so he came in determined to prove he’s capable of fitting in with Claude Julien‘s squad as a bottom-six guy.

“Coming from Montreal, it was a lot different system wise,” he said. “Here, it is a lot different. Everyone stay in your lane, up-and-down, not east-west, north-south. Sometimes I am used to going to support the guy on the other side and then I lose my position completely. That’s a thing that I need to learn here and I’ve talked about it and coach has talked to me about it and it’s nice to hear. It’s a thing I need to learn but besides that everything is going pretty good.”

Read More: Benoit Pouliot,
Adam McQuaid leaves early; maintenance days for Rich Peverley, Dennis Seidenberg 11.02.11 at 2:15 pm ET
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Bruins defenseman Dennis Seidenberg and forward Rich Peverley were the only two to not take the ice for Wednesday’s practice at TD Garden, with Claude Julien saying afterward that he had given the two players maintenance days.

Adam McQuaid, meanwhile, left the practice early after he was cut on the chin, but there didn’t seem to be much concern from Julien’s end.

Aside from Peverley being out, the forward lines were the same.

Milan LucicDavid KrejciNathan Horton

Brad MarchandPatrice BergeronTyler Seguin

Benoit Pouliot – Chris Kelly – Jordan Caron

Shawn ThorntonGregory CampbellDaniel Paille

Also, if you have access to today’s Globe or, you have to check out Fluto Shinzawa’s story on how being a sportswriter furthers his conquests as a foodie. A great, off-beat read from one of the best in the business. Significantly better than my attempt.

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Dennis Seidenberg, Rich Peverley,
Nathan Horton touches on everything: Concussion, depression and bad penalties 11.02.11 at 1:57 pm ET
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Speaking with the media for the first time in nearly two weeks amidst his cold start to the season, Bruins right wing Nathan Horton touched on how things have been for him to begin his second season of the Bruins. Horton heavily implied that his struggles are somewhat related to the concussion he suffered in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals against the Canucks.

Horton is long removed from symptoms of his concussion, which ended his postseason, but he said that he still hasn’t gotten back to feeling satisfied with his game since the hit from Aaron Rome.

“I’m still trying to get my game back,” Horton said. “I obviously don’t feel 100 percent out there. I’m not myself, you know? I’m just trying to get that back. Last game, I thought we played better. Hopefully we can build off it.”

Asked specifically whether he was dealing with anything physical, Horton replied, “No, no.”

“Obviously I just need to get my timing and stuff,” he said. “I still don’t feel like I’m myself out there. Like, I’m fine, but I just need to be better obviously. That’s it. I just need to be better.”

Horton said that he has not had any issues with depression, a symptom of post-concussion syndrome.

Here’s the rest of what Horton had to say:

On playing with Milan Lucic and David Krejci:

“Obviously they help. I’ve said a ill ion times that they’re great players. I played with them last year, so it definitely feels more comfortable for me.”

On whether he felt it would take time before he would be comfortable again:

“I had never had a concussion or anything like that. I didn’t know what to expect coming in. Obviously it has, but I’ve just got to keep working through it. I know I’ve got to be better, and I can be better. It’s just a matter of time. I want to be better, so I think it’s got to come sooner or later.”

On whether the penalties he’s taken have been out of frustration:

“Obviously in the Carolina game, yeah, but in the other ones, not really, no. I just try to get in there. Guys are turning and I’m just kind of still finishing my check a little bit, and that’s how it happens. Except for the one game, [no].”

On the fact that the bad penalties have happened more than once:

“I mean I guess I’m getting myself in the wrong spot at the wrong times, but there’s a lot of calls that are being missed out there, too. I obviously have to be more cautious of when I do it, but if they’re not a call a lot of them that they get on you, you’re obviously going to get mad and want to do something, too. It’s just a matter of holding back and not getting that last whack in, because I guess that’s what they’re calling.”

On being physical coming off concussion:

“I’ve got hit, I’ve hit some people, but obviously I haven’t gotten killed. I’ve gotten hit as much as you can, I guess. I have gotten hit pretty hard. Again, I’m just trying to forget what happened and just move forward.”

On whether he thinks about his concussion when he plays:

“I’m only human. I do think of it. I think anybody else, anybody would that was in my situation. It’s not easy, obviously, but again, I’m still trying. I want to be better, and I think that’s what matters.”

On whether he is depressed:

“Nope. No depression issues. Other than the fact that I want to do better, that’s about it. No depression issues or anything.”

On opening up about his concussion:

“Whenever it’s brought up, I try to forget about it. I definitely want to move on, and it seems like it’s just kind of dragging on. People keep asking about it, so I’m going to talk about it, but obviously I don’t want to talk about it. I want to forget about it, and that’s it. I feel fine. Now I just want to be better.”

On avoiding the media:

“I’m not giving an excuse or anything. I’m just saying obviously I want to be better and that’s it. I just think I haven’t been around. I don’t know.”

On whether he is dealing with a lack of motivation:

“I actually feel like I’m trying. I’m backchecking. I think it’s all about when I get the puck, or when I don’t have the puck, I’m just thinking too much. When you think too much, it doesn’t go the way you want it too. When you’re not thinking too much, it just falls into place, and good things happen. Definitely, that’s what I want to get back to here.”

On whether his concussion impact preparation for season:

“Definitely. It did interrupt my summer. ‘€¦ It was a short summer, but definitely a tough one. I’m just trying to forget it, like I said, start doing better and playing more like myself and let this pass through. That’s what I want to get back to doing.”

Read More: Nathan Horton,
Report: Chris Clark to Providence 11.02.11 at 11:35 am ET
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The slumping Bruins have made a move, though it isn’t a huge one. According to Fluto Shinzawa of the Boston Globe, veteran forward Chris Clark has signed a professional tryout agreement and will report to Providence. The veteran forward was in Boston on a tryout during the preseason and lasted until the very last day but was released from his tryout.

The signing of the 35-year-old could eventually provide the B’s with a good leader and hard-nosed player should he make it to Boston this season. Clark was a former captain of the Capitals and wore an ‘A’ for one of the Bruins’ preseason games. He broke his nose in a fight during his last preseason game with the B’s.

Read More: Chris Clark,
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