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Bruins work on power play prior to practice, Patrice Bergeron leaves early 02.08.11 at 11:25 am ET
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WILMINGTON — A familiar face was on the ice at Ristuccia Arena Tuesday as Jordan Caron and the Bruins practiced after having Monday off. The first 20 minutes were spent working on the power play, with units consisting of Zdeno Chara, Mark Recchi, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron and Milan Lucic, as well as a unit of Dennis Seidenberg, Steven Kampfer, Brad Marchand, Gregory Campbell, and Michael Ryder getting work in.

The rest of the B’s took the ice at 11 a.m. Caron is skating on the Campbell/Thornton line, while a grey sweater-wearing unit of Tyler Seguin, Blake Wheeler, Zach Hamill, and Ryder was used in all sorts of different combinations. Bergeron left the ice at about 11:20 a.m. after a puck hit him in the face area on a drill. Tuukka Rask immediately opened the door at the other end of the ice, with Bergeron leaving practice in a hurry.

Here is a look at the lines:

Lucic – Krejci – Horton

Marchand – Bergeron – Recchi

Seguin – Wheeler – Hamill – Ryder

Caron/Paille – Campbell – Thornton

We’ll have more from the room after the conclusion of practice.

Read More: Jordan Caron, Patrice Bergeron,
Bruins prospect Tommy Cross plays star in Beanpot semifinal 02.08.11 at 12:39 am ET
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Boston College defenseman Tommy Cross hopes to one day make some noise at TD Garden as a member of the Boston Bruins, but Monday he settled for doing so in his familiar Eagles sweater. The former second-round pick of the Bruins scored the game-winning goal in Monday’s Beanpot semifinal, beating Boston University netminder Kieran Milan in overtime with the Eagles on the power play and clinching a 3-2 win.

The Bruins traded up in the 2007 NHL Draft to select Cross with the 35th overall pick. Right knee injuries kept him from participating in Bruins rookie development camps until this summer, where he joined fellow B’s prospects for the first time.

With Harvard’s Alexander Fallstrom and BU’s David Warsofsky having lost on Monday, Cross will be the lone Bruins representative in the tournament final vs. Northeastern.

Read More: Beanpot, David Warsofsky, Tommy Cross,
Bruins recall Jordan Caron from Providence 02.07.11 at 6:28 pm ET
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In an announcement that would probably be much bigger news if it weren’t for Marc Savard‘s season ending, the Bruins on Monday recalled winger Jordan Caron from Providence. Caron began the season in the NHL before being sent down on Dec. 6.

In 20 games for Boston this season, Caron had three goals and four assists for seven points and averaged 13:17 of ice time per night. The 20-year-old had 6-11=17 totals for Providence over 27 games.

The Bruins are currently without winger Daniel Paille for the next three games due to a four-game suspension, which could potentially help Caron find a spot in the lineup given that both players are strong on the penalty kill.

Caron was selected by the Bruins with the 25th overall pick of the 2009 NHL draft. He impressed early on in training camp but struggled with confidence, making him a healthy scratch in the game’s first season. He went on to score his first career goal against Martin Brodeur on Oct. 16, his second NHL game. Caron did not score a goal over the 13 games leading to his demotion.

Read More: Daniel Paille, Jordan Caron,
Marc Savard not ready to think about retirement 02.07.11 at 3:05 pm ET
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A big decision was announced Monday by the Bruins, and Marc Savard hopes it’s the last major decision he has to make regarding the concussions that have plagued his career.

An emotional Savard took the podium at TD Garden for the second time in as many seasons on Monday as he discussed his 2010-11 season ending after just 25 games. Savard has suffered two concussions in just over 10 months, with the most recent coming on Jan. 22.

With Savard having incurred four concussions over the course of his career and Peter Chiarelli saying the center was “frustrated” with struggling with the speed of the game when he did return from post-concussion syndrome in December, Savard said he is avoiding the inevitable decision of whether he might retire.

“I’m trying to stay away from that right now,” Savard said Monday. “It’s tough enough as it is not to be able to finish the season. Obviously, we’re going to get some more medical stuff done, some tests, and then I’ll be able to make a clearer decision on what my future is.

“Right now, I’m hoping to be able to continue at some point again.”

If that doesn’t prove to be the case and Savard decides to retire, one guy who has seen it all would be understanding.

“No, I wouldn’t [blame him for retiring],” Mark Recchi, who sat in the front row of the press conference with teammates Zdeno Chara and Patrice Bergeron, said. “Concussions are tough. ‘€¦ There’s got to be some thoughts. He’s got three young children, and you want to play with them, you want to have fun with them, you want to [seem them] grow up and be a good dad. Part of that is that you want to be healthy for them.

“I think he’s got a lot to think about, but I think the most important thing is right now that focuses on just getting better. Getting healthy, and then he can be a little bit more clear on his decisions and whether he wants to continue or not.”

Read More: Marc Savard,
Bruins to hold press conference for Marc Savard 02.07.11 at 10:18 am ET
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With multiple reports indicating Sunday that Bruins center Marc Savard will be shut down for the rest of the season, the team called a press conference for Monday at 2 p.m. at TD Garden. Present at the press conference will be the center, general manager Peter Chiarelli, and head team physician Dr. Peter Asnis.

Savard suffered the fourth concussion of his career on Jan. 22 when he took a hit in the corner from Avalanche defenseman Matt Hunwick and has been out since. The 33-year-old, who missed the first 23 games of the season with post-concussion syndrome, had 10 points (2 G, 8 A) and a team-worst minus-7 rating in 25 games with the Bruins this season.

Read More: Marc Savard,
David Krejci stuck with wrong sticks 02.05.11 at 4:38 pm ET
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David Krejci knows that after the B’s were shut out Saturday, it’s in his hands to keep the top line producing. Right now, he just doesn’t like what’s in his hands.

Krejci, who has a contract with Bauer, has been in a bit of an unusual spot over the last couple of games. An issue with manufacturing the stick he uses each night has left him using a stick he’s had trouble getting a feel for.

“This stick sucks, and that’s all I’ve got,” Krejci, in his usual calm demeanor, said after Saturday’s game. “You can put it up on TV or in the papers. I don’t care. This stick sucks.”

The irony in the situation, of course, is that Krejci is a happy user of Bauer and loves the stick that he usually plays with. The problem is that the factory that manufactures his stick, for whatever reason, will not be able to produce his model of choice again until Feb. 11, and as a result, he’s left with the type he used to use earlier in his career.

“We ordered the sticks, my guy said they were coming [when] he ordered them,” the center said. “The trainers called them again because they didn’t come in the mail and they said, ‘Oh yeah, we’ve closed the factory and we’re going to open it up again. We’re not making any sticks until Feb. 11,’ so they sent me the sticks that I used to use a long time ago.”

Krejci fell out of love with the stick when he used them earlier in his career, but it seems he’ll have to get used to them over the next few games.

“That was the reason why I changed from those sticks to the new ones I’m using, because I don’t like these ones,” he said. “I changed them because I didn’t like them anymore, but [now] it’s the only thing I can have.”

Krejci hasn’t scored in 19 games, though he has five assists over his last six games. The center, who is accountable when it comes to his game, stressed that he wasn’t talking about his own performance or suggesting that his unhappiness with the stick has hurt his play.

“I’m not making excuses for my game,” Krejci said. “I just don’t like that stick. That’s all it is.”

This isn’t the first time a Bruins player has had a peculiar hangup regarding equipment. Blake Wheeler had issues with his skates last season before switching to CCM for this season.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, David Krejci,
Antti Niemi, Sharks blank Bruins, 2-0 02.05.11 at 3:21 pm ET
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One goal proved to be all the Sharks needed to defeat the Bruins Saturday, as a Logan Couture power play strike in the first period provided enough in a 2-0 San Jose victory. Devin Setoguchi had an empty netter in the final seconds.

Antti Niemi made 26 saves for the Sharks in handing the Bruins their fifth shutout this season.

Zach Hamill, making his season debut, logged 9:34 of ice time and had zero shots on goal. Zdeno Chara led the B’s in shots on goal, putting four pucks on Niemi.

The Bruins will return to action on Wednesday when they host the Canadiens at TD Garden.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

- Following Saturday’€™s 0-for-4 performance on the man advantage, the Bruins have now gone five games without a power-play goal. They’€™re 0-for-12 during that stretch and just one for their last 19.

The B’€™s had a couple chances on their two power plays in the first, including a Milan Lucic rebound bid that went wide and a Steven Kampfer one-timer that Niemi got his blocker on, but they failed to sustain any sort of consistent pressure. They barely even got set up on their one man-up chance in the second. Boston’€™s biggest chance on the power play came midway through the third when Joe Thornton went off for a trip, but the B’€™s once again struggled to get organized and mustered just one shot on goal.

- The biggest thing the B’s proved in beating the Stars on Thursday was that they could beat a Western Conference team at home. With Saturday’s loss, they saw their already bad record in such games fall to 1-3-2 on the season.

- Just as the Bruins have struggled against Western teams at home, they have also been sub-par when hosting matinees at the Garden. Saturday’s loss makes them 1-3-0 on the season in day games in Boston.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- The Bruins allowed just five shots in the first period and six in the second. For the game, they allowed a season-low 18. That’s pretty impressive when considering that the Sharks entered Saturday leading the league with 34.1 shots on goal per game.

The B’s previous low in shots allowed was 20, back on Oct. 28 against the Maple Leafs.

- Adam McQuaid drew penalties for the Bruins. The 24-year-old blueliner first drew a roughing minor on Ben Eager before the two fought in the first period. He later drew a timely trip on Joe Thornton as he brought the puck into the offensive zone at 10:10 of the third.

Scott McLaughlin and Mike Petraglia contributed to this report.

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