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Bruins trade Milan Lucic to Kings for first-round pick, Colin Miller, Martin Jones 06.26.15 at 4:48 pm ET
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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Don Sweeney made his second monumental trade of Friday evening, sending Milan Lucic to the Kings for the 13th overall pick, defenseman prospect Colin Miller and restricted free agent goaltender Martin Jones.

The Bruins will retain $2.7 million of Lucic’s $6 million salary, according to Joe McDonald of ESPN.

By getting the 13th overall pick, the Bruins now have three consecutive picks in the first round. The B’€™s are slotted at No. 14 and acquired the 15th pick from the Flames in the Dougie Hamilton trade.

Lucic, 27, is entering the final year of a three-year contract that carries a $6 million cap hit. As of Friday afternoon, the Bruins had not talked to Lucic’€™s representatives about extending him.

Lucic has spent his entire career with the Bruins since being drafted in the second round of the 2006 draft. He had a career year in Boston’s Stanley Cup winning season in which he scored 30 goals, but Lucic’s production has diminished since then. Last season, he scored just 18 goals in 81 games.

After establishing himself as one of the league’s true power forwards, Lucic leaves Boston having scored 139 and 203 assists for 342 points in 566 regular season games over eight seasons. He has 772 career penalty minutes.

The Lucic deal is the second major trade made by new general manager Don Sweeney in a matter of hours. Sweeney made a highly suspect trade by sending Hamilton to the Flames for just three draft picks — Nos. 15, 45 and 52 — rather than re-signing the budding 22-year-old defender or trading him for a much bigger haul.

Boston’s deals so far — including the signing of Adam McQuaid — leave the Bruins with $55,291,667 committed to 15 players for next season.

Source: Bruins sign Adam McQuaid to 4-year deal 06.26.15 at 4:15 pm ET
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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — After trading Dougie Hamilton to the Flames, the Bruins signed defenseman Adam McQuaid to a four-year contract with an average annual value of $2.75 million.

The deal leaves the Bruins with $62,591,667 against the cap committed to 16 players. The salary cap for next season is $71.4 million.

McQuaid has played his entire NHL career with the Bruins since being acquired in a 2007 trade with the Blue Jackets. McQuaid was selected by Columbus in the second round of the 2005 draft but never signed with the team before being dealt to Boston for a fifth-rounder two years later.

Bruins trade Dougie Hamilton to Flames for picks 06.26.15 at 3:23 pm ET
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Dougie Hamilton

Dougie Hamilton

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — The Bruins have traded Dougie Hamilton to the Flames in exchange for the 15th, 45th and 52nd picks in this year’s draft.

Hamilton, the ninth overall pick in the 2011 draft, is one of the NHL‘€˜s top young defensemen at 22 years old. He is coming off his entry level contract and is in line to become a restricted free agent on July 1. Though the Bruins had talks with his agent, J.P. Barry, the sides never came close to a deal.

Trading Hamilton presents a major risk for the Bruins, who are giving up one of their best players and weakening a defense that now has no star power behind 38-year-old Zdeno Chara.

The Bruins have now traded all three players they selected with the picks from the 2009 Phil Kessel trade in 2010 second overall pick Tyler Seguin, Hamilton and 2010 second-round pick Jared Knight.

The trade of Hamilton means that Boston is in line to pick back-to-back with the 14th and 15th selections.

Milan Lucic unsure of future, has Canucks on list of teams to which he’d accept trade 06.26.15 at 12:54 pm ET
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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. –€” Milan Lucic is playing the waiting game.

With the draft hours away and speculation — perhaps most of which is incorrect –€” growing at its typical rate, the 27-year-old is unsure of whether he will be dealt. The sides have not been in touch, so Lucic does not know the team’€™s intentions.

Lucic has submitted a list of 15 teams to which he would accept a trade, as requested by Don Sweeney, though the general manager noted Thursday that he has gotten lists from every Bruins player with a partial no-trade. That group consists of Lucic, Loui Eriksson, Brad Marchand and Chris Kelly.

Lucic confirmed to WEEI.com Friday that the Canucks are on his list of acceptable teams, as first reported by Dhiren Mahiban of the Canadian Press. Lucic grew up in Vancouver and played both minor and junior hockey in the area, most notably starring for the Vancouver Giants of the Western Hockey League from 2005 to 2007.

Steve Conroy of the Boston Herald reported Friday that the Sharks, Kings and Ducks are also on Lucic’s list. The other 11 teams are unknown.

Lucic is entering the final year of a three-year contract that commands a $6 million cap hit. Because of Boston’€™s desire for cap flexibility and uncertainty as to what Lucic might command on his next deal, Lucic could be a trade candidate.

Sweeney said last month that he intended to get a feel for Lucic’€™s contract demands before deciding how to proceed. It is believed that Sweeney and Lucic’€™s agent have not had any contract talks of substance.

Read More: Milan Lucic,
Carl Soderberg signs with Avalanche 06.26.15 at 11:46 am ET
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A day after trading for his rights, the Avalanche have signed Carl Soderberg to a five-year deal, according to reports from ESPN.com.

Craig Custance and Pierre LeBrun reported Friday morning that Soderberg’€™s deal carries an annual $4.75 million cap hit and has a full no-trade clause over its first two years before becoming a partial no-trade.

The Bruins notified Soderberg this offseason that they would not be offering him a new contract due to cap constraints. In exchange for his rights, Boston got back its own 2016 sixth-round pick, which was traded to Colorado at last season’€™s trade deadline in the Max Talbot deal.

Ryan Spooner is expected to replace Soderberg as the Bruins’€™ third-line center. Spooner is coming off his entry-level contract and will be a restricted free agent on July 1. He is expected to sign a short-term deal.

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Bruins trade Carl Soderberg’s rights to Avalanche 06.25.15 at 5:10 pm ET
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Carl Soderberg

Carl Soderberg

FT. LAUDERDALE, Fla. — The Bruins traded center Carl Soderberg’s right to the Avalanche Thursday, officially concluding a three-year marriage that ended when the team told him weeks ago that they wouldn’t be offering him a contract for next season.

By trading Soderberg’s rights, the Bruins get an asset, however small, in exchange for essentially nothing. The pick is Boston’s 2016 sixth-rounder, which was sent to Colorado at the trade deadline in a deal that sent Jordan Caron to Colorado and Maxime Talbot to Boston. The Avalanche, meanwhile, will have a six-day head start to sign Soderberg before he reaches unrestricted free agency on July 1.

Though he struggled down the stretch this season, Soderberg will be one of the top players in free agency should he make it there. With the center pool extremely thin this summer, Sodergberg figures to command a hefty raise from the $1,008,333 cap hit he had over the course of a three-year deal signed when he came to Boston from Sweden during the lockout-shortened 2013 season. With the Bruins strapped for cap space, his departure seemed inevitable.

In that sense, the Bruins might be kicking themselves for not getting more for Soderberg when they could have. Boston was sitting in the second and final Wild Card spot leading up to the NHL trade deadline on March 2. Rather than throwing in the towel and trading players for assets (Soderberg likely would have fetched the Bruins a first-round pick and possibly more), the Bruins opted to keep their players and try to make the playoffs.

The circumstances were tricky, as then-general manager Peter Chiarelli knew he needed to make the playoffs in order to keep his job, but he wasn’t allowed to be a major buyer due the organization’s decision to not trade away future assets. Given that the B’s ended up missing the playoffs, the end result in hindsight was a blown opportunity on the part of management.

In 161 career regular-season games for the Bruins, Soderberg had 29 goals and and 65 assists for 94 points. His first real contribution to the Bruins came when he was forced into the Stanley Cup Final due to Patrice Bergeron‘s injuries, with Soderberg dressing in a pair of games against the Hawks despite having just six NHL games under his belt to that point.

That 2013 season burned the first year of his deal, with the Bruins starting Soderberg at left wing the following season. Soderberg proved far more productive at center once the B’s moved him to his natural position midway through the 2013-14 season, skating Chris Kelly alongside him take down-low responsibilities in Boston’s zone. Soderberg worked well in tandem with Loui Eriksson, who returned to being a 20-goal scorer last season with a full year as Soderberg’s linemate.

The Bruins acquired Soderberg, who was originally drafted 49th overall by the Blues in 2004, in a 2007 trade that sent goaltender Hannu Toivonen to St. Louis. Soderberg’s rights were deemed expendable by the Blues because the player had opted to remain in his home country of Sweden, where he continued to play professionally before finally leaving for the NHL in 2013.

Soderberg expressed a strong desire to stay in Boston, but he plans to play in the NHL next season regardless of location. A return to Sweden is not expected, as he figures to have ample suitors.

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Don Sweeney has lists from all Bruins with partial no-trade clauses; Loui Eriksson lost full-no trade when B’s missed playoffs 06.25.15 at 3:20 pm ET
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FT. LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Bruins general manager Don Sweeney doesn’€™t feel the need to make trades this weekend, but he’€™s more than prepared to.

Sweeney revealed during Thursday’s pre-draft availability that he has collected the proper lists from each Bruins player with a partial no-trade clause. Such lists, which vary in number of teams, reveal teams to which a player would accept a trade.

“Absolutely. I have every list,” Sweeney said.

Milan Lucic, Brad Marchand, Loui Eriksson, Chris Kelly and Dennis Seidenberg are Boston’€™s players with no-trade clauses, with Lucic, Marchand, Kelly and Eriksson having lists. David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara and Tuukka Rask have no-movement clauses for the foreseeable future, with Krejci’s and Rask’s statuses changing to no-trades over time.

Eriksson waived his no-trade clause to come to the Bruins from Dallas two years ago, but his no-trade was preserved in writing at the time, which means he still has his no-trade rights.

According to sources, Eriksson had a full no-trade, but when the Bruins missed the playoffs last season, it reverted to a 14-team list. Lucic has a 15-team list, while Kelly can approve a trade to up to eight teams. Seidenberg has a full no-trade until Dec. 30, 2016, after which it will become an eight-team list. Seidenberg has said that he would waive his no-trade clause to facilitate a deal if Boston tried moving him.

The size of Marchand’€™s list is currently unknown. Because he is 27, he will become qualified for no-trade rights on July 1, if that is indeed when they kick in. Players cannot have no-trade rights unless they are old enough (or have enough NHL service) to qualify for unrestricted free agency status. Marchand still has two more years on a cap friendly deal ($4.5 million cap hit), so the idea of him being traded would figure to be a moot point. Of the aforementioned group of players, he is the biggest no-brainer to keep.

At some point this offseason, the Bruins will turn to the trade market in an effort to clear salary cap space. The Bruins have $59,841,667 committed to 15 players for next season, with the upper limit of the salary cap set at $71.4 million this week. Boston still needs to sign restricted free agents Dougie Hamilton, Ryan Spooner and Brett Connolly to new contracts. Don Sweeney has also expressed an interesting in re-signing unrestricted free agent Adam McQuaid.

Sweeney said that he does not necessarily feel a need to swing his deals before the draft begins Friday.

“I think every situation is different,” Sweeney said. “You could look at getting past the draft and getting past free agency as teams say, ‘OK, well I missed that first wave; there will be another wave of player movement opportunity.’ I think just everybody is looking to explore whatever they can at this particular time because the opportunity presents itself on a bunch of different levels.”

Read More: Chris Kelly, Don Sweeney, Milan Lucic,
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