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Rask on D&H: ‘I just gave it everything I had’ 04.22.10 at 1:55 pm ET
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Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask joined the Dale & Holley show Thursday afternoon and talked about his heroics in Game 4 of the B’s first-round series vs. the Sabres. Rask made a diving save on Mike Grier midway through the third period to keep the game tied at 2, stretching across the crease to stop Grier’s one-timer. “I just gave it everything I had there on that shot and I think he kind of fanned on it and it ended up hitting my blocker,” Rask said. “That’s one of those saves [where] sometimes it hits you, sometimes it doesn’t. That time I got lucky there.”

Here’s the video of the save:

Rask already has a reputation as a goalie who does not get rattled easily, and even Wednesday’s double-overtime thriller didn’t leave him worried.. Said Rask: “You can’t be too nervous when you’re playing, but I talked to people who were at the game and they said they were pretty nervous about that game.”

That said, Rask noted that no one should confuse his levelheadedness with a lack of fire. Said Rask: “When the time comes to be competitive, I will be competitive. But my game is to be calm and not get too emotional.”

Rask said he likes playing every other day, and it hasn’t taken its toll on him yet. “It’s good when you’re playing good, and it’s good when you’re playing bad because the next game’s coming so fast,” he said. “I guess at some point it’s going to catch up and I’ll be tired, but it’s been great so far.”

Rask said he’s been impressed with the play of his counterpart, Buffalo’s Ryan Miller. “He’s been rock solid throughout the year and it’s the same in the playoffs. ‘€¦ It’s fun to watch him, and it’s fun to beat him, too,” Rask said, adding: “You try not to pay too much attention to the other goalie. You just try to do the best job you can.”

Rask said he’s been aided by his defense, which has blocked a number of shots, especially Johnny Boychuk. “I buy him dinner every now and then so he likes to block those shots,” Rask joked of his minor league and NHL teammate. “He’s great at it. It really helps me a lot when guys like that block shots.”

To hear the interview, click on the Dale & Holley audio on demand page.

Recchi on D&H: ‘It would be a big boost getting [Savard] back’ 04.20.10 at 2:31 pm ET
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Bruins forward Mark Recchi, one of the heroes of Monday night’s Game 3 victory over the Sabres, joined the Dale & Holley show Tuesday afternoon. Recchi said teammate Marc Savard has been skating longer than the two days that the media found out about this week, and he’s hopeful Savard will return to action soon.

“He actually texted me last week and told me he was actually sneaking on the ice, so I knew it,” Recchi said. “He swore my secrecy, so I wasn’t allowed to to say it. I didn’t even tell any of my teammates. So, I knew he was getting eager and feeling good. It’s great to see him out there. He’s had a couple of hard days of practice [on his own]. I don’t think he likes being out there by himself right now, but hopefully we’ll see him in practice here soon and get him back in the lineup.”

Asked if he thought Savard might return by the end of the Sabres series, Recchi said: “I’m not sure. We’re the last guys to hear when he’s going to play. Like I said, he’s been practicing before us, and he hasn’t been there after. I’m not really sure. The longer it goes, obviously the chances get better, because he is feeling good and he is skating. By the end of this week he’ll have a full week of skating in. So, who knows? … Obviously, it’s going to come down the coach as well, if things are going well, when do you put him in, when’s the right time to do it? Obviously, he’s a tremendous player, and it would be a big boost getting him back.”

As for his own future, Recchi said he feels like he still has some hockey left in his 42-year-old body. “I still love the game, I still love the practice, I still love everything about it, and being in the dressing room with the guys,” Recchi said. “So, at the end of the season I’ll sit down. Obviously, I think I can still play and still help. It’s just a matter of figuring out everything at the end of the year and figuring out what’s best for me and my family.”

Recchi was asked about rookie goaltender Tuukka Rask, who has developed into a young star. Said Recchi: “He’s right there with all them. This kid is a world-class goalie. His composure for a 22, 23-year-old is incredible. … He made the big saves all year when we needed them, and he continues to do it.”

Recchi said Rask does not get taken out of his game even when he allows a goal. “It doesn’t faze him one bit,” Recchi said. “He’s a very, very competitive kid. He knows, he gets upset at himself, but he’s able to put it aside. … Game 2 in Buffalo, he battled like a bugger. You don’t see it too often, but you could see he was fighting it a little bit, he was fighting the puck. But when a goalie competes as hard as he does and fights it and battles it and is able to make the big saves really when you don’t feel great is a great sign for a young goalie. He came out and we had a great win. And then he was awesome again [Monday] night.”

Recchi reflected on the Bruins’ revenge game against the Penguins March 18 when the fans booed the B’s off the ice. “We were kind of disappointed in the way we played because we came out of that seven-game trip just before that playing great hockey and we really seemed to get more consistent,” Recchi said. “We found a way to be a tougher team to play against every night and a team that is committed to being better. That’s why we went on that good stretch — 8-3-1 in our last 12 games or whatever — to get ourselves in a good position for the playoffs.”

To hear the interview, click on the Dale & Holley audio on demand page.

Read More: Bruins, Dale & Holley, Marc Savard, Mark Recchi
Seidenberg out 8 weeks after surgery 04.07.10 at 10:31 am ET
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The Bruins announced that defenseman Dennis Seidenberg had successful surgery to repair a lacerated flexor carpi radialis tendon in his left forearm and is expected to sidelined for eight weeks. Seidenberg suffered the injury during the first period of the Bruins’ game vs. the Maple Leafs on Saturday in Toronto.

Seidenberg has played in 17 games for the Bruins since being acquired from the Florida Panthers at the trade deadline on March 3. He has two goals, seven assists and a plus-9 rating.

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Bruins sign Colborne, Caron 03.31.10 at 12:10 pm ET
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The Bruins on Wednesday morning announced the signing of four players, including first-round draft picks Joe Colborne (2008) and Jordan Caron (2009).

Here is the release from the team:

Boston Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli announced today that the club has signed forward Jordan Caron, forward Joe Colborne, goaltender Michael Hutchinson and defenseman Steven Kampfer to entry-level contracts.

The 19-year-old Caron split this season between Rimouski Oceanic and Rouyn-Noranda Huskies of the QMJHL (Quebec Major Junior Hockey League) after being traded from Rimouski to Rouyn-Noranda on Jan. 9, 2010. The 6-foot-2, 202-pound forward registered 17 goals and 16 assists for 33 points in 23 games with the Huskies and he earned 9-11-20 totals with the Oceanic in 20 games. He currently leads playoff scoring in the QMJHL with six goals for the Huskies and has notched a total of 13 points (6 goals, 7 assists) in the Quebec League playoffs. Caron skated with the Canadian squad that earned a silver medal at the World Junior Championships this past January. A native of Sayabec, Quebec, Caron was drafted by the Bruins in the first round (25th overall) of the 2009 NHL Entry Draft.

The 20-year-old Colborne skated in all 39 games with the University of Denver this season, earning 22-19-41 totals. He recently tallied a power-play goal in the Pioneers’€™ 2-1 loss to the Rochester Institute of Technology in the East Regional semifinal of the NCAA tournament. He finished the season first on the team in power-plays goals (11), first in total goals (22), tied for second in points (41) and second in shots (116). Colborne has played 79 games in two seasons with the Pioneers, registering 32 goals and 40 assists for 72 total points. The Calgary, Alberta, native was drafted by the Bruins in the first round (16th overall) of the 2008 NHL Entry Draft.

The 20-year-old Hutchinson has appeared in 46 regular-season games this season with the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League, registering a .913 save percentage and a 2.86 goals-against average. The goaltender has started all five playoff games this month and has posted a .901 save percentage with a 2.84 GAA. Hutchinson and the Knights recently defeated the Guelph Storm in the opening round of the OHL playoffs, winning the series 4-1. They will face the Kitchener Rangers in a second-round playoff series beginning Thursday. The 6-foot-3, 185-pound Barrie, Ontario, native was drafted by Boston in the third round (77th overall) of the 2008 NHL Entry Draft.

The 21-year-old Kampfer skated in 45 games for the University of Michigan this season, recording three goals, 23 assists (26 points) and 50 PIM. The Wolverines were recently defeated by Miami (Ohio) in the NCAA tournament’s Midwest Regional final. Kampfer finished his senior season ranked third on the team in plus/minus with a plus-18 rating and fourth on the team in shots with 115. Over four seasons with the Wolverines, Kampfer played in 147 games, registering 7-54-60 totals and 134 PIM and was named to the CCHA All-Tournament Team in both his junior season and senior season. The 5-foot-11, 197-pound native of Jackson, Mich., was selected by the Anaheim Ducks in the fourth round (93rd overall) of the 2007 NHL Entry Draft. He was traded from Anaheim to Boston on March 2 in exchange for a conditional fourth-round draft pick.

Thornton on D&H: ‘I wish I had knocked him out’ 03.19.10 at 11:15 am ET
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Bruins enforcer Shawn Thornton was a guest of the Dale & Holley show Friday morning (audio here) to talk about Thursday night’s game against the Penguins and his fight with Matt Cooke. “I tried to address it as best I could,” Thornton said. “I wish the fight would have went on a little longer, and I wish I had knocked him out. It didn’t happen, unfortunately. But it was addressed. I think that was the biggest thing. He didn’t have to fight me, and he did. I think that sort of put some water on the fire.”

Asked what he said to Cooke before they fought, Thornton said he suggested Cook remove his helmet, but the Penguins forward elected not to. “I was just asking what he wanted to do, I didn’t really care,” Thornton said. Thornton proceeded to remove Cooke’s helmet for him before landing a big right hand to the face.

Thornton said it was important that Cooke accepted Thornton’s challenge last night, for both teams’ sake. “I don’t respect people that play the game the wrong way. I think that’s probably evident by me throwing punches when he was down on his knees, because I don’t ever do that,” Thornton said. “I have to give him credit for stepping up and taking one in the head for his team, because it could have got a lot uglier for guys who probably didn’t deserve it to be ugly for if he didn’t do that.”

Like the fans who booed the Bruins’ effort Thursday night, Thornton was surprised by his team’s lackluster performance. “We just didn’t bring enough emotion or energy,” Thornton said. “I have no answer for the lack of energy, other than guys being sick, but that’s not an excuse for anything. I’m just saying some guys were under the weather. But the guys that aren’t could have played better, too.”

Thornton said he was impressed with the energy from the fans. “I know after my fight was maybe the loudest I’ve heard that place other than Game 6 against Montreal a couple of years ago,” he said.

The Bruins are battling for a playoff spot, but their disappearing acts ‘€” Thursday night’s included ‘€” do not inspire confidence. “The lack of consistency I suppose is concerning,” Thornton said. “We need everyone going. I think in the playoffs, everyone takes it up another level. I’m assuming that everyone, if we get in the playoffs, or when we get in the playoffs, everyone will come to play every night. We’re a really good team if everyone comes to play. We can’t have any passengers, myself included.”

Check back later for more from this interview.

Milbury on D&H: ‘Mired in this Neanderthal B.S.’ 03.18.10 at 12:50 pm ET
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NESN hockey analyst Mike Milbury checked in with Dale & Holley show (audio here) to talk about Thursday night’s Bruins-Penguins game and the potential for nastiness involving Penguins villain Matt Cooke. Milbury said he’s heard that NHL vice president Colin Campbell will address the teams prior to the game. Said Milbury: “That’s what I’m hearing. I don’t know what he’s going to say, but I’m sure there will be references to past incidents, [Todd] Bertuzzi-[Steve] Moore, for example, and he doesn’t what any nonsense and what-not, which is good. We had such a great buzz after the Winter Classic. We had such an incredible buzz after the Olympics, and now we get stuck and mired in this Neanderthal B.S., which is really unfortunate for the sport.”

Milbury said he expects the Bruins will seek retribution early. “I hope it isn’t silly. I hope it’s mano-a-mano and confrontational and sends a message to Matt Cooke that this isn’t going to happen. And I actually think if it happens twice, I wouldn’t be too disappointed. But I don’t want it to deteriorate. … The actual game had such a positive buzz. I don’t want to lose that in the circus sideshow here. I don’t think it’s necessary. I don’t think there’s a need to go after Sidney Crosby in any untoward way.”

Added Milbury: “The Bruins, their macho is challenged, their ego is challenged, their self-esteem is on the line. I think they’re going to feel compelled to get even, whatever that means. I’m not so sure they have to. I wish all this stuff happened spontaneously rather than a planned event, but it happens.”

Milbury said it’s important not to let things get out of hand, for the sake of all involved. “We want a hockey game,” he said. “A hard-played and well-fought — no pun intended — hockey game, where if there’s a way to get some measure of justice when you feel like justice had not be been served on a cheap-shot hit to your teams’ most valuable player, so be it. So be it. Man, oh, man, this is not a real war, this is a professional hockey game to be played hard and within the boundaries of the rules, for the most part. Let’s not lose sight of the fact that people get hurt out here.”

As for Campbell, Milbury said: “I think he’s done … what he thinks is right, by the book. You may have issues with that, but I know Colin Campbell well enough to know he takes the job seriously. … He struggled with it. He struggled with this decision big-time.”

Milbury said the Penguins should let Cooke know his dirty play will not be tolerated any more. “It’s disgraceful if they haven’t addressed it already,” Milbury said.

As for the Bruins’ chances to make the playoffs, Milbury said: “I think it’s going to be Boston or New York, and I give the edge to Boston now.”

Read More: Bruins, Colin Campbell, Matt Cooke, Mike Milbury
Brickley on D&C: Bruins will respond to Cooke 03.18.10 at 8:31 am ET
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Andy Brickley, NESN analyst for Bruins games, checked in with the Dennis & Callahan show to talk about Thursday’s night’s game between the B’s and the Penguins. (For the audio, click on the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.)

Brickley said he has no doubt the Bruins will seek revenge on Penguin Matt Cooke for his hit on B’s center Marc Savard. “No question [the Bruins] need the points, given the situation that they’re in in the Eastern Conference, but that will be secondary tonight,” Brickley said. “This is an opportunity for the Bruins to respond, something they didn’t do at the time when Savard was hit by Matt Cooke, and they will take every opportunity to make sure their character is no longer in question.”

Brickley said he expects both teams will be eager for the confrontation to take place as soon as possible. “If I was Danny Bylsma, the coach of the Pittsburgh Penguins, I would make sure Matt Cooke starts tonight. Don’t give it a chance to continue to percolate. Wait for his first shift and allow the crowd and everybody else to get behind this. And I would expect Boston to line up guys like [Zdeno] Chara and [Milan] Lucic and [Mark] Stuart, and make sure it’s a very long night for Matt Cooke.

“You almost feel like don’t suspend this guy, make him have to play the full game, he can’t take any shifts off, he has to play the full 60 minutes. That might be the best retribution.”

Brickley said the Bruins need to go right up to Cooke and put him on the spot. “You call him out,” Brickley said. “It’s very plain and simple. You want to make it the longest night you can possibly make it for him.”

Asked about the possibility of Cooke refusing to engage a Bruins challenger, Brickley said: “That would not be the best course of action for Matt Cooke, and I don’t expect that to happen. I don’t think that will be allowed to happen. This is a guy that plays on the edge, he’s a repeat offender. If you took a look at the list of players that he’s fought in his career, it’s not a who’s who of the tough guys in the NHL, so I guess there’s that possibility, but I don’t think that’s going to happen.”

Brickley said he still is unable to understand the reasoning behing the league’s decision not to suspend Cooke. “They got it wrong,” Brickley said. “Plain and simple. Colin Campbell got this wrong. This was a blindside hit to a defenseless player in a position where he had no idea the hit was coming. It was predatory in nature, he targeted the head, and he’s a repeat offender. How can you not suspend this guy? I don’t understand the logic behind it. They had an opportunity to make the right call, the make a difference. … They dropped the ball.”

Added Brickley: “There’s no logic and there’s no reasoning sufficient for me to be able understand the rules that come down from the office in New York. Colin Campbell is going to be in attendance tonight. The two teams will be addressed. Warnings will be put out. They created this culture ‘€” they created it, and now they want to manage it.”

As for the Bruins’ lack of a reaction in the game when the hit took place, Brickley said: “Nobody really got a real good look at it outside of Michael Ryder, so I will give them the benefit of the doubt. … Sometimes you just don’t see it when you’re out on the ice.”

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