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Barry Pederson on Sports Sunday: Bruins must ‘get physical’ to win Game 3 06.05.11 at 12:13 pm ET
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NESN hockey analyst Barry Pederson called in to WEEI’s “Sports Sunday” to discus the Stanley Cup finals. To hear the full interview, go the weekend shows audio on demand page.

While Pederson said that inserting Shawn Thornton into the starting lineup was important to the Bruins turning the Stanley Cup finals around, playing 60 minutes of physical hockey was essential.

‘€œThe Bruins have got to do what they have not done in the third periods of both games,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œWhen you listen to the coach, what he’€™s most frustrated about is both of those games they had an opportunity to win, and they lost non-Bruin-like, which was to sit back and allow the opponent to take the game to you.’€

Pederson said that the defense had to tighten up in support of Tim Thomas and stop allowing outnumbered situations. Part of that means the forwards making smarter decisions in the neutral zone, and part of that means resting Zdeno Chara on the power play.

‘€œ[Chara] is the single best shut-down defenseman in the National Hockey League,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œSo I want that matchup against the [Daniel and Henrik] Sedin twins. I know that [Vancouver coach] Alain Vigneault is going to be coming after every power play that Vancouver kills off, the first guys that are going to be thrown out there are the Sedin twins. I want to make sure that my top pair is fresh.’€

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Read More: Alex Burrows, Barry Pederson, Boston Bruins, Stanley Cup Finals
Recap of Bruins’ Stanley Cup appearances since 1972 06.01.11 at 10:16 am ET
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The Bruins will begin their first Stanley Cup finals since 1990 Wednesday in Vancouver. Their last appearance was in 1990. Their last title came in 1972.

The Bruins have been in five Stanley Cup finals since ’72, and WEEI looks back at all of them.

1974: Bruins vs. Flyers

The Bruins finished the 1973-74 regular season first in the East Division, with Phil Esposito, Bobby Orr, Ken Hodge and Wayne Cashman finishing 1-2-3-4 in scoring in the NHL. They were heavily favored against the Flyers, although the Flyers finished first in the West, just a point behind the Bruins.

The Bruins won Game 1 by a 3-2 count, with both Orr and Cashman scoring a goal and recording an assist. In Game 2, the B’s led 2-0 after one period thanks to goals by Cashman and Esposito, but three third-period Flyers goals ‘€“ two by center Bobby Clarke ‘€“ cost the Bruins the game and home-ice advantage.

The Flyers took Games 3 and 4 at the Spectrum, holding the Bruins scoreless after the first period of both Games 3 and 4.

The Bruins protected home ice with a 5-1 Game 5 victory thanks to two goals from Orr, but in Game 6, Rick MacLeish scored his 13th goal of the postseason for a 1-0 win and the title. Goalie Bernie Parent was named MVP of the playoffs.

1977: Bruins vs. Canadiens

Although the third-seeded Bruins had won the Adams Division during the regular season, they were no match for the top-seeded, defending champion Canadiens in the 1977 finals. The Canadiens outscored the Bruins 16-6 in the four-game sweep.

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Read More: Bobby Orr, Bruins, Canucks, Phil Esposito
Canucks’ Cory Schneider on M&M: Bruins ‘a tough matchup’ in Stanley Cup finals 05.30.11 at 1:00 pm ET
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Former Boston College standout and current Canucks goaltender Cory Schneider joined the Mut & Merloni show Monday morning to talk about the upcoming Stanley Cup finals. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Schneider said that although the Canucks didn’€™t learn all that much about the Bruins from their 3-1 loss in February, what he’€™s noticed most from watching the playoffs is Boston’€™s depth.

‘€œThey have three deep lines, and offensively even their fourth line is effective in what they do,’€ Schneider said. ‘€œOn any given night for them a different guy can step up and be the difference.’€

Schneider also said the Canucks would need to keep track of Milan Lucic and Patrice Bergeron in particular. He called Lucic a ‘€œbig guy who can disrupt a lot of plays and go to the net and create problems.’€ He compared Bergeron with Vancouver’s Ryan Kesler: a multi-talented player who contributes on offense, defense, faceoffs and special teams.

‘€œHe [Bergeron] can really burn you if you’€™re not paying attention,’€ Schneider said.

Schneider also complimented Zdeno Chara‘€™s defense, calling him a ‘€œNo. 1 guy’€.

‘€œHe’€™s got such a long reach that it doesn’€™t matter who you put out against him, he’€™s going to try and find a way to shut them down,’€ Schneider said. He added that the Canucks’€™ Swedish twins, Daniel and Henrik Sedin, might be able to beat Chara.

‘€œYou probably haven’€™t seen anything like them when they’€™re playing down low,’€ Schneider said. ‘€œThey’€™re cycling the puck and they make these soft passes to each other, you have no idea how they made it. It’€™s pretty incredible to watch. That will be a great matchup.’€

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Cory Schneider, Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron
Garry Galley on D&C: ‘I like Boston’ in Game 7 05.27.11 at 11:10 am ET
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Hockey Night in Canada analyst and former Bruins defenseman Garry Galley joined the Dennis & Callahan show Friday morning, hours before Game 7 between the Bruins and Lightning. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

Galley said the Bruins have the edge because of home-ice advantage and Tim Thomas.

“I always like the team that is at home, and I like the team that’€™s got the best goaltender,” he said. “Dwayne Roloson just has not had the kind of series, and he’€™s not exuding the kind of confidence right now that I would have liked to have seen. Even though he won Game 6, I don’€™t think he looked as good as I thought he was going to, and it’€™s a very tough series for him.

“I do believe you go with Dwayne Roloson. You have to; he’€™s the one who got you to the dance. And he’€™s capable of having a Game 7-winning kind of game. But I just think Tim Thomas has always bounced back from games like this. He shown in this series in Game 5 that he can pretty much win a game on his own. I like Boston in this.”

Galley also said he won’t be surprised if the game is decided on an unpredictable bounce of the puck.

“This game may come down to late in the third and overtime,” he said. “And it comes down to a bounce, guys, it always has. ‘€¦ There’€™s always something that happens. It’€™s a game of mistakes, so there will be a mistake on the play, and someone will benefit from it. I don’€™t think it will be next to one team or another when that happens, it will just be the hockey gods that tip it one way or another.”

Here are some other highlights from the interview:

On the biggest factor for Game 7:

Listening to Claude Julien‘s comments, what matters the most is that you embrace the opportunity. You can’€™t go into this thing thinking of the ‘€œwhat ifs’€ and what can happen. You have to go in and you have to embrace the chance that you have the opportunity to win a hockey game and put yourself in the Stanley Cup finals. That’€™s it. If you come into this game thinking about losing and what’€™ll happen if you lose, then you’€™re already done.

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Dwayne Roloson, Eastern Conference Finals, Game 7
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