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Cam Neely admits he wants a voice but adds, ‘I don’t want to be a general manager’ 04.16.15 at 7:52 am ET
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There was some speculation in the immediate aftermath of Peter Chiarelli’s firing Wednesday that Cam Neely might assume the role and add the general manager’s title onto his existing role of team president.

While team CEO Charlie Jacobs admitted that hockey operations will, for now, report directly to Neely, the team president said he wants no part of the gig long term.

“I’€™m not a micromanager and I don’€™t want to be a general manager,” Neely announced. “I want to have a vision, I want to understand what the vision of a general manager is going to be for the hockey club, obviously, as we move forward. I felt that I was able to have conversations and express my opinions. I felt that I was able to do that the last four or five years’€”six years. But as far as’€”I’€™m not a micromanager and I don’€™t intend to be.”

Neely did offer a critique of where he thinks the team might have gone astray over the last four seasons since winning the Cup in 2011, especially as it relates to drafting new talent.

“We have to look at the organization as a whole obviously and today’€™s day and age with the game and the cap and a team that is fortunate enough to spend to the cap,” Neely said. “As you have success and those players get better and you have to pay them more, you need those entry-level players to come in and be able to have an impact. It’€™s expensive to always get ready made players.

“It’€™s a nice luxury to be able to have but when you don’€™t have the cap space to be able to do that, you’€™ve got to find entry-level players. I think there was a period of time there where’€”I don’€™t think I’€™m saying anything that hasn’€™t been chronicled’€”we missed on three or four years on some drafts that I think right now we’€™re kind of paying the price for. That’€™s not the sole reason but that’€™s an area where I think we can improve.”

Neely was asked if he had input or final authorization on moves that might have led the Bruins away from a tougher on-ice image that he has preferred ever since his playing days.

“Like I said I’€™m not going to micromanage a GM. I want him to do his job,” Neely said. “I certainly want to have conversations about why and what the thought process is to make particular deals and trades and how that is going to look for the franchise, not just when it happens but also moving forward. The other thing to your second question, I think where we’€™ve had success is our four lines play hard. That’€™s doesn’€™t mean you can’€™t have skill and play hard. It’€™s something where ‘€˜is it easy to find?’€™ No, but I think I’€™d like to see us get back to playing hard and where the team plays for each other. I think we lost that a little bit.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Cam Neely,
Charlie Jacobs makes it clear: Bruins’ goal is ‘to play and compete for the Stanley Cup’ 04.16.15 at 7:35 am ET
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Bruins CEO Charlie Jacobs took the occasion Wednesday, at the press conference to confirm the firing of general manager Peter Chiarelli, that simply making the playoffs wasn’t necessarily enough to save the GM’s job.

In January, Jacobs told reporters, after meeting with the team, that he would consider the season a failure if they didn’t reach the playoffs and that the team was badly underachieving.

This led to the presumption that if the Bruins made the playoffs and got hot at the right time, Chiarelli and coach Claude Julien would be safe. Jacobs hinted Wednesday that wasn’t necessarily the case.

“I feel they were accurate, and that in January, my frustration of where the team was — I think we were in ninth or 10th place in the conference at the moment, on that day in January –€” and I said that for us not to make the playoffs would have been a failure. So here we are, out. And I want to clarify, by the way, my comment about the playoffs: The expectation is for us not only to get into the playoffs, but to play and compete for the Stanley Cup, not just to get in. I feel that may be lost a little bit in the messaging.”

It was appropriate that on tax day Jacobs said the team was doing an internal audit of on-ice performance and off-ice planning and preparation in the front office, and that this audit had been going on all season.

“But I didn’€™t necessarily think, at the end of the season, OK, let’€™s sort of wash our hands of X, Y or Z associate. That wasn’€™t it. It was, again, going back and sort of doing an audit of what had transpired throughout the year, where we were in terms of an organization and in terms of our depth, whether it be from our scouting department, our minor league system, where we are with our senior club, of course, and then sort of determining where, perhaps, we need to improve. So again, this was not an easy decision.”

As it turned out, Jacobs and team president Cam Neely not only fired Chiarelli but also relieved three scouts of their jobs, including amateur scouts Mike Chiarelli (brother of Peter) and Denis Leblanc, and European Head Scout Jukka Holtari.

“I have a great deal of respect for Peter and what he accomplished here, especially bringing back [the Stanley Cup] I can’€™t thank him enough for 2011 and the ride that that was,” Jacobs said. “But we felt it was time to move on, and this was the move.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Charlie Jacobs, Peter Chiarelli,
Tuukka Rask gives Bruins an ‘F’ for season: ‘If you don’t make the playoffs, you’ve failed’ 04.14.15 at 10:52 am ET
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Good was not good enough.

In a nutshell, that sums up Tuukka Rask and the Bruins’ first non-playoff season since 2007. The Bruins goalie acknowledged as much in assessing what went wrong throughout a season in which the Bruins could never find a consistent groove.

Rask finished with a 34-21-13 mark in a career-high 70 games, including 64 starts, also the most ever by the 28-year-old in his eight-year career. Rask had a 2.30 goals against average and a .922 save percentage, good numbers to be sure but when you compare them to the previous three seasons (2.03 GAA, .929 save percentage), they represented a drop off, just like the team.

“Good. Not great, good,” Rask said. “Improve? Always like to improve. But I looked at my numbers and the scoring chances, and it was not obviously quite as good as last year, but it was still over 82 percent. So, that’€™s good.”

But Rask left no doubt about how he felt about the season from a team perspective when asked to give a grade for the season.

“Well, what’€™s failed, F? Because you know, if you don’€™t make the playoffs, you’€™ve failed,” Rask said. “You know, it doesn’€™t matter what happened, if you make the playoffs you’€™ve failed. I mean, if we were to make the playoffs, who knows what could have happened. So the line there is very thin, and we really felt like we had a group of guys to make a good run in the playoffs. But we failed because we didn’€™t make the playoffs and we’€™ll never find out.

“Never would have thought that I’€™d be in this situation, never been in this situation in my career before. Hopefully never have to be here again. It’€™s tough.”

After reaching the Cup finals in 2013 and the second round in ’14, Rask has a little extra time this spring to think about what went wrong.

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Tuukka Rask,
Brad Marchand promises missing playoffs ‘definitely something that’s going to drive us next year’ 04.13.15 at 11:33 pm ET
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One of the pitfalls of success can be the false sense of comfort it provides.

Brad Marchand said Monday on wrap-up day at TD Garden that these Bruins who missed the playoffs with 96 points took winning for granted too often this season and it eventually caught up with them at the end.

This is a Bruins team that had made the playoffs in each of the first seven seasons under Claude Julien. But the run of success ended in season No. 8 as the Bruins watched their hold on the second wild card spot slip out of their hands in the final week.

“We all have to come in knowing that we have to learn from this year,” Marchand said. “We have to know that every game we have to be prepared for and we can’t have any guys taking nights off. I think too many nights we had guys not at the top of their game and most nights we could only rely on a couple of guys. We have to make sure that we all are prepared every night. That’s what we seemed to be so good at in the past. Four lines, 60 [minutes] and the goalie rolling and when we play like that and play within the system, we’re a good team.”

Having won the Stanley Cup in 2011, reaching the finals two years later and finishing with the best record last season, does Marchand think the Bruins took winning and success for granted too much this season?

“For sure. We definitely did,” Marchand said. “When you’re at the top, you feel like it’s going to be there all the time,” Marchand said. “It’s always going to happen. This is a big wakeup call for our team. I think now we realize how hard we have to continue to work to be at the top and get back there. It is definitely a wakeup call for us. We definitely took it a bit for granted and expected it to be there. We’re going to have to make sure we’re working hard to get back to the top.”

Marchand made the playoffs in each of his first five seasons before missing out this year.

“It’€™s obviously very disappointing. Something to really’€”it’€™s tough to describe,” Marchand said. “You have such high hopes coming into the year and obviously with this team we’€™re expected to not just make the playoffs but win the whole thing. To not be there is different. I’€™ve never missed the playoffs before in my life so it’€™s not a good feeling at all. It’€™s definitely something that’€™s going to drive us next year.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand,
Chris Kelly on looming line choices: ‘We’ve got a great problem to have’ 04.05.15 at 10:27 am ET
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Chris Kelly is hardly worried about the looming decisions that will have to be made to determine who will play and who won’t come playoff time.

Kelly moved from his left wing spot and centered a line Saturday that had Max Talbot on left wing and newcomer Brett Connolly on the right. This left out Gregory Campbell and Daniel Paille. The way Kelly sees it, there are five players trying to make Claude Julien‘s job as difficult as possible with competition in the last week.

“Competition, that’€™s why we all play. Competition is good, and it makes everyone better, I think. We’€™ve got a great problem to have, good players that can play in the lineup, and I think every guy is trying to make it difficult on him to make those tough decisions,” Kelly said. “Ultimately, you want to go out there and play your best hockey and help the team.”

Connolly played in just his second game with the Bruins since returning from a broken finger in his second practice with the Bruins and was relieved to finally contribute. Kelly said he was happy from what he saw from his line during a 2-1 shootout win over the Maple Leafs Saturday.

“We had some pretty good chances,” Kelly said. “I think all three of us, our feet were moving, and we weren’€™t in our end too often, so it was good. A bounce here, a bounce there, maybe we would’€™ve been able to get one.”

Julien insisted after the game that what he’s trying to do is more about keeping everyone fresh than holding an audition for the fourth line in the final week. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brett Connolly, Chris Kelly,
Kelly Olynyk: Dougie Hamilton ‘broke his ribs’ and is ‘trying to come back before playoffs’ 04.01.15 at 11:05 pm ET
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Kelly Olynyk of the Celtics played with a closed left eye Wednesday, inspired by friend Dougie Hamilton. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

Kelly Olynyk of the Celtics played with a closed left eye Wednesday, inspired by friend Dougie Hamilton. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

An unexpected party has weighed in on Dougie Hamilton’s injury situation.

After playing with one eye shut due to an elbow from a teammate in a shootaround earlier in the day, Kelly Olynyk announced he was inspired by the young Bruins defenseman. In the process, he said that Hamilton’s injury — previously only reported as upper-body while the team hasn’t said word one — is broken ribs.

“I remember two days ago I was texting Dougie Hamilton and he told me he broke his ribs and he’€™s trying to come back before the playoffs and I was like, man I can’€™t sit out, he’€™s gonna rip me,” said Olynyk, who was wearing a Toronto Blue Jays hat.

“All those hockey guys would have killed me so I had to do it.”

Hamilton has missed the last five games since leaving with an injury in a 2-1 shootout loss at Florida on March 21. Teams are traditionally very closed lipped about releasing the details of any injury news, especially this close to the playoffs. WEEI.com reported last week that Hamilton’s injury would keep him out weeks, not months.

Video: Kelly Olynyk spills beans on Dougie Hamilton and his broken ribs.

A video posted by Mike Petraglia (@trags1) on

Read More: Boston Bruins, Boston Celtics, Dougie Hamilton, Kelly Olynyk
Milan Lucic: ‘Obviously, these are desperate times’ 04.01.15 at 10:15 am ET
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The Bruins have been as streaky as Milan Lucic. A five-game win streak was followed by six straight losses.

It’s only appropriate the Bruins ended March with their third straight win, a key victory, spurred on by one of their better players in the month as the left winger provided the game-winning margin with some grit and good fortune.

His rush to the Panthers blue line with just over a minute left in regulation ended with a “why not” shot on goal that found its way through the skates of Roberto Luongo and gave the Bruins a 3-2 win Tuesday at TD Garden. Lucic has become a leader for young stars Ryan Spooner and David Pastrnak on his line. On Tuesday, he led by example when it mattered most.

His drop pass to Spooner resulted in a bad-angle shot by Spooner from the left boards that tied the game early in the third period. His late-game rush with Spooner ended up being the difference in winning and losing.

“I was checking to see to see if Spoons was onside,” said Lucic, who finished the game with a goal and an assist and five of each for the month. “It was kind of a one-on-four situation and I just tried to get [the puck] past the two D-men [and] on net and I got a little bit of luck there and was able to find a hole there in the five-hole. It was one of those things where you’re kind of swarmed. You’re just getting the puck on net, and thankfully it went in for myself and ends up being a big goal for a big win.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, David Pastrnak, Florida Panthers, Milan Lucic
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