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Bruins know Cup defense is all about them, not the opponent 04.07.12 at 8:30 pm ET
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Through all the number crunching and scenario possibilities Saturday afternoon, the Bruins knew one thing – it doesn’t matter who they’re playing, they are focused on themselves.

And they like what they’re seeing in the mirror right now.

“Well it helps, it definitely helps,” Milan Lucic said of Saturday’s 4-3 shootout win, giving them four wins in their final five games. “Obviously, there was a bit of a worry I guess when we couldn’€™t even put two wins together. We were winning one, losing one. Winning one, losing two, winning one. So, you know the fact that we were able to kind of regroup and get things going in is definitely more of a confident feeling and we’€™re looking forward to the challenge that’€™s coming up ahead.

“It doesn’t matter at all,” Lucic said when asked if he was planning to pay close attention to Saturday’s night games to see if they’re playing Washington or Ottawa.

“There’s a good saying, ‘In order to be the best, you have to beat the best.’ So, you know, it doesn’t matter who you play or who’s on the other side. It’s about who’s in this room and how we’re going to play so we’re committed to that, and that’s our main focus right now.”

The Bruins are happy with where they’re at following a shootout win against the Sabres that left them with 102 points and the No. 2 spot in the East. They’ll be opening with the Capitals on Thursday at TD Garden, as the Capitals won Saturday night in New York while the Panthers clinched the Southeast Division with a win over Carolina, clinching the No. 3 seed in the East. The Capitals wound up as the No. 7 seed while the Senators – who will play the Rangers – finished as the No. 8 seed.

“I got the app that shows you all the scores on the old iPhone so obviously I’m going to take a look by the end of the night and see who we’re up against,” Lucic said afterward. “It’s going to be a hard-fought battle no matter who we play… We’re looking forward to the challenge.”

Added Claude Julien, “That’€™s the feel that there should be in the dressing room. Anybody who decides who they want as an opponent, whether it’€™s, you know, saying, ‘€˜Oh, I’€™d rather play this team than that team,’€™ or plays to pick their own opponents don’€™t deserve to win.

“That’€™s the way — this is a game. This is not wrestling, it’€™s not a fake sport, you don’€™t go out there and pretend to play and make sure you lose because you want a certain team to play against, because karma’€™s a pretty powerful thing, and I believe in doing the things right. And if we’€™re going to win, we’€™re going to have to beat every team that comes in our way, and that’€™s the way we’€™ve approached it.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Milan Lucic, NHL, Ottawa Senators
Marty Turco appreciates ‘tremendous’ time in Boston 04.04.12 at 10:40 am ET
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Marty Turco did Tuesday night what he’s always done in his long NHL career – stem the tide.

The powerful Penguins jumped out to a 2-0 lead on a couple of fluky goals in the first period.

The 35-year-old in those unmistakable gold pads and blockers then held the fort until the Bruins could muster the strength to tie the game. What happened late in the second period he had little control of as he became a shooting range target during a 5-on-3 power play that yielded two goals and the game was essentially over, as the Penguins prevailed, 5-3.

“I think by the end of the night [with] the chances, the amount of chances, that we had you feel like you deserve to win a hockey game. Those power play goals really ended up costing us, with those calls. But there’€™s a lot to be taken from this game. For me, it’€™s the end of the line as far as the regular season goes and these guys, you know, they battle to be down twice like that and even though we went down 5-2 in the third, there was no give up in this bunch,” Turco said.

“And that’€™s, I think that’€™s a huge thing for these guys to build on. They’€™ve been a tremendous third period team, everyone knows that real well. But to see them pour it on at the end and give us a chance was also a good sign too. But at the end of the day it’€™s disappointing to lose anytime, never mind against a team like that.”

Turco has had quite the career, including with Dallas in 2002-03 when he set a new NHL record with a 1.72 goals against mark. He won the NCAA title with Michigan twice, including in Boston in 1998. He signed with the defending Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks in the summer of 2010.

But to find what Turco means to this Bruins team you have to look back to March 3. That’s when Tuukka Rask injured his groin against the Islanders and was essentially lost for the rest of the regular season. Two days later, the Bruins signed Turco, who in December 2011 signed a deal with the EC Red Bull Salzburg of the Erste Bank Hockey League in Austria. He cleared waivers on March 7 and joined the Black and Gold. Since he was signed after the NHL trade deadline, he is not playoff eligible. But that does not diminish his presence over the last four weeks in the Bruins dressing room, and their impact on him.

“It’€™s been tremendous, really,” Turco said. “I’€™ve been around for a bit; can’€™t say that disappointments have been much a part of my time here. I’€™ve been fortunate to have an opportunity and I’€™m truly grateful, for my family and I, for [what] the Boston Bruins gave me when things seemed pretty bleak. You want to play great and you want to show them, never mind anyone else, and for the most part ‘€“ days, game and practice, and being a good team man ‘€“ I’€™ve felt pretty proud of my time here so far. Between Tampa and a little bit tonight, those two games ‘€“ part of them anyway ‘€“ are pretty disappointing but at the end of the day I’€™ll continue to hold my head high like I have all year to be ready in this position and still want to play some. So, we’€™ll see what happens.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Chicago Blackhawks, Dallas Stars, Marty Turco
Torey Krug finally gets his chance on the big stage 04.04.12 at 10:30 am ET
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Not all rookies get their chance to make their NHL debut playing for the defending Stanley Cup champs the week before they begin their title defense.

But with the Northeast Division salted away again and their No. 2 spot in the Eastern Conference sealed, the Bruins had the ideal chance to baptize 20-year-old defenseman Torey Krug into the world of big boys hockey Tuesday night against a team with names like Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

Welcome to the show, kid.

“I think stepping on the ice the start of the game,” Krug said of his biggest moment during Boston’s 5-3 loss to the Penguins, his first game in the NHL. “What the coaching staff did was have me warm up a few games with the team and that actually helped a lot. You wouldn’€™t think it, but it really does. You get your bearings on the ice, skating around with the other guys.

“I mean I’€™m most upset that we lost. The expectation here is to win and we have to fine-tune-up before the playoffs.”

Krug has played on big stages before, playing collegiately for Michigan State in the CCHA. He’s played against the likes of Michigan, Ohio State and Ferris State. But clearly, Tuesday was a different animal.

“It’€™s a lot different,” he said. “It was a lot of fun to play in front of these fans. Michigan State, the crowd we had there was very intimate and into the game and I feel it was the same here. Everybody knows their stuff and they know hockey so the fans are unbelievable and it’€™s something I look forward to on a nightly basis.”

Krug, who turns 21 on April 12, was signed to an NHL entry contract on March 25. He skated with the Bruins last Tuesday in practice and dressed on Thursday but was a healthy scratch. After a week, he was ready to make his debut Tuesday against one of the most talented teams in hockey.

“I thought he handled himself well,” his coach Claude Julien said. “I like the way he moved the puck. I think everybody who knows the game realized that he’€™s a good puck-mover, his mobility was obvious, and the only thing I would tell you is that you could see him in the defensive zone really thinking about trying to play within our system, and sometimes he was maybe just a fraction of a second delayed ‘€“ which is totally normal ‘€“ but once he knew what he had to do, he went. So there was no hesitation once his mind was made up, and that will only get better as it becomes second nature, and that’€™s totally, as I said, totally natural for a guy playing in his first game. But the rest of it — as I said, when he had the puck, didn’€™t hesitate, thought he moved it well and made great passes.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Michigan State, NHL, Torey Krug
Was hit on Adam McQuaid dirty? ‘Reckless’ is more like it 03.30.12 at 12:07 am ET
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At first glance, the Jason Chimera hit on Adam McQuaid with six minutes left in the first period Thursday evokes emotions of anger and revenge.

But even the Bruins, who have been on both sides of vicious hits over the last several seasons, were careful to choose their words carefully after the game, given the fine line between finishing your check and hitting from behind and endangering a vulnerable player.

Chimera was given a five-minute major for charging and a game misconduct for the hit that left McQuaid on the ice for several minutes with a gash over his eye and a dazed head.

The Bruins reaction? Measured.

“Well, you know, again, when it happens to you, you also have to be honest about it. I think, again, he came off the bench, and he was going hard, and maybe it was a little bit reckless, but there’€™s no doubt in my mind that it wasn’€™t intentional,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “You know, McQuaid, Mac just turned at the last second and, you know, put himself in a bit of vulnerable position, but still, like, I agree with the referee’€™s call.

“It was a bit of a reckless hit, and it deserved probably a five[-minute penalty] when you look back at the replay, and they had to make that decision. It was a tough one, but certainly wasn’€™t intent to injure by the player, in my mind. And, you know, and that’€™s why I keep saying, and you’€™ve heard me before, I really, really encourage our players to be careful, with the speed of the game today, to make sure you don’€™t turn your back to the play as much because those kind of things happen. And you worry about the security of the players, you worry about the safety of the game, and I’€™m one of those guys that will look at both sides of it and not just preach for my side of it.”

Joe Corvo – already filling in for injured Dennis Seidenberg – not only saw the hit, but saw both sides. 

“It’€™s nearly impossible when a guy comes, I noticed I think he came off the bench, and really didn’€™t break stride,” Corvo said. “It’€™s a tough play because it’€™s hard for that forward to stop when he’€™s coming that fast and Quaider [McQuaid] kind of turned a little bit. The guy could have let up a little bit but it just happens fast. I think that’€™s why he was so upset that he got thrown out. I don’€™t think he’€™s a dirty player, I think just with his speed it was hard for him to stop.”

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Jason Chimera
Brian Rolston is finally over ‘whatever happened in Long Island’ 03.28.12 at 12:33 pm ET
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February 27 was a day of liberation for Brian Rolston.

He was traded from the hapless New York Islanders with no chance of making the playoffs back to the Bruins, who are still among the favorites to reach another Stanley Cup final.

Rolston has certainly been inspired.

In his current seven-game scoring streak, he has three goals and nine assists, already matching his productivity in 49 games with the Islanders this season. The Bruins have won three in a row for the first time in over 40 games.

“Just been given a great opportunity, the coaches have shown a lot of confidence in me in certain situations that gives me confidence as a player, and obviously playing with two great players helps out a lot as well,” Rolston said after Tuesday’s 5-2 triumph over Tampa Bay. “I think we just have good chemistry together, that’€™s about it. I’€™ve produced over my career and you know whatever happened in Long Island happened in Long Island and it’€™s past that now.”

What happened on Long Island was four goals and five assists in 49 games for the team that has served as the perennial doormat of the Eastern Conference for the last decade.

Rolston has tasted success from the Stanley Cup before, winning it all with the 1995 New Jersey Devils. He sees these Bruins picking up momentum at just the right time.

“Well, you know obviously we had two real tough games on the road that we won, those were huge games for us,” Rolston said. “Just to get confidence, when you win you get confidence. This team is so good structurally that it’€™s just a matter of time before you do put it together, but this is a good time to put it together for sure and it’€™s a good team in here, great team.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brian Rolston, New York Islanders, NHL
Zdeno Chara proves why he’s the ‘toughest guy in the [NHL], bar none’ 03.28.12 at 9:55 am ET
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Bruins captain Zdeno Chara is notoriously humble and soft spoken about his own accomplishments.

That’s why it’s often a good idea to listen to his teammates and coach when trying to gauge what impact he’s had on the Bruins, even a teammate like Brian Rolston who hasn’t shared a dressing room with him for that long.

Asked what he’s learned about Chara since coming back to Boston in a deadline trade with the Islanders, Rolston was honest enough.

“Probably nothing,” Rolston said. “He’€™s so hard to play against; he’€™s a tremendous leader. Obviously he does that by example, but he’€™s the toughest guy to play against in the league ‘€“ bar none. If you were to pull the forwards on every team they would say the same thing and coming in on a nightly basis knowing that you have to face him ‘€“ it’€™s a tough task.”

Rolston set up the game-winner of Tuesday’s 5-2 triumph over Tampa Bay when he tried a wraparound midway through the third, only to have the puck flutter its way out to a wide open Benoit Pouliot. But the heroics of Rolston and Pouliot don’t happen without Chara, who has he did all night, brought the puck in deep into the offensive zone to apply more pressure on a team known for its stingy defense.

The secondary assist was Chara’s third of the night, a night on which Chara matched a career-high with three helpers and was honored before the game for becoming the latest and greatest member of the NHL’s 1000-game club.

“Yeah, those were big,” Rolston added. “Z had a great game, another great game for us. It’€™s huge, it’€™s huge ‘€“ if you can get the defensemen helping out, and especially against on team like that that collapses down all the time. It’€™s difficult to get anything going down low so it’€™s great to have defensemen contributing offensively.”

That’s exactly what Chara did when he took the puck midway through the first at the Tampa Bay blue line and charged around the zone like Wayne Gretzky, eventually running at the net, creating a scoring chance for Shawn Thornton when Dwayne Roloson left a juicy rebound.

“Basically, I get a puck on the blueline, I was trying to ride the blueline and then just kind of opened up and I really decided to challenge that seam and once I got a little bit more room, I was kind of deciding between a shot and pass,” Chara explained. “But again, everything was happened and I decided to take it to the net and we’€™ve always been taught when you do those things, good things happen and they did. We scored on the rebound, and it ended up being a good play.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Brian Rolston, Cam Neely
Tim Thomas on shootout win: ‘We needed that immensely’ 03.17.12 at 9:44 pm ET
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All eyes were on Tim Thomas on Saturday.

Of all the Bruins with plenty to prove entering the St. Patrick’s Day matinee against the Flyers, the Bruins goalie was at the top of the list.
So, when he turned away Danny Briere on the shot of the shootout, earning the Bruins a 3-2 win before an electric TD Garden house, he raised his arms out of celebration and relief.

“Yeah, I think it was very important, we needed that immensely,” Thomas said. “We needed to show up and have a good game at home. Things haven’€™t been going our way. That’€™s a polite way of saying it lately. To battle out tonight and come up with a good, solid strong game at home and pull out with two points, is hopefully very big for us moving down the road.”

The Bruins stuggles of the last two months have been well documented. They were manhandled in all three losses on the road this week, outscored 17-5 in losses in Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay and Florida. Overall, they had lost four straight coming in. Thomas started three of those four games and was pulled in the loss in Pittsburgh.

Saturday, he was a different goalie. He stopped Eric Wellwood on a shorthanded blast midway through the first. Moments later he denied superstar Jaromir Jagr with his right pad, as he tried to beat Thomas to the far side. Then, in the final 30 seconds of regulation, with the Flyers sensing a dramatic come-from-behind win in regulation, Thomas battened down the hatches as Philly unloaded cannon shot after cannon shot.

Thomas said his confidence wasn’t shaken this week but the saves early, especially on Jagr, didn’t hurt.

“I wasn’€™t feeling unconfident going into it, I know there was that first bouncy shot at the beginning of the game, but heck I don’€™t trust the bounces right now,” Thomas said. “That’€™s natural I think. But the save on Jagr, it did help to boost my confidence more than it already was.”

Speaking of bounces, that all that beat Thomas on Saturday in regulation as Matt Read and Jakub Voracek redirected shots that Thomas had little-to-no chance of stopping. Then came the last 30 seconds.

“I wasn’€™t sure of the clock exactly, I knew we were getting down towards the end of the game,” he said. “I just didn’€™t want bad luck to strike again, and at that point we’€™re just playing for one point to make it to overtime. You don’€™t want a real good effort like that to go to waste. So, I was just focused on making it through the end, I didn’€™t know if there were 30 seconds or a minute left.”

Thomas said his mindset didn’t change in the shootout either.

“I was actually too focused on trying to figure out what my approach was going to be to the shootout,” said Thomas, who allowed goals to Read and Claude Giroux before stopping Briere in the shootout. “I played Jagr a certain way on the breakaway during the game so my plan going into the shootout was to go out and play the other guys like that. But that didn’€™t work, but it was great to see ours keep going in. After the second one, I kind of changed up what I do and I came way out to [Danny] Briere, I think I went all the way out to the hash marks to try and give him a different look and try to make him think what the heck’€™s he doing.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Philadelphia Flyers, Tim Thomas,
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