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Jarome Iginla ‘understands’ why Bruins couldn’t bring him back: ‘There are cap issues’ 10.13.14 at 7:39 pm ET
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Jarome Iginla holds no grudges against the Bruins. As a matter of fact, he said after Monday’s 2-1 win over his former employer that he’s grateful for the one year he spent in Boston.

“It was definitely a little bit different,” said Iginla, who had no shots or assists in 17 minutes and 20 shifts. “I had one of the best [years] of my career, one of the most exciting years last year, one of favorite years, the whole experience coming to this. I made some good friends that are on their side playing with the team, and we had a very good team. So it was a little different, for sure. It hasn’€™t been too long, it feels almost like you’€™ve just been gone for a long vacation, but it’€™s part of the game.

“Coming from the other side, once the game starts, it’€™s business. We were looking for our first win, and we knew they were trying to get things going for themselves. But it’€™s a bit different on the ice. You wouldn’€™t want to play all the time against that team, but it’€™s a great place and it’€™s fun to come back.”

After 30 goals and 31 assists in 78 games on Boston’s top line, Iginla left Boston for Denver and signed a three-year, $16 million deal with the Avalanche. On Monday, he acknowledged the real economics the Bruins were facing.

“Well, I understand it,” Iginla said. “I was hoping at the time, before free agency opened, that it could work out, but you know there are cap issues. With my family, we wanted to be able to make sure, I’€™m going to play more than one year, and I didn’€™t want to just play one year then next year [the Bruins] have even less [cap] room. With all the good, young guys they have coming up, they’€™ve got to keep room for them and keep signing them.

“It’€™s a good problem to have, though, if you’€™re the Bruins. But I understood why and figured if I was going to move my family, it would be the time now, before they keep getting more entrenched in school and liking it even more, and then trying to move the following year. I’€™ve got a great opportunity in Colorado. I’€™m excited to be here, and it’€™s a good, young, fun team. But like I said, before that with the Bruins, it was one of the best experiences of my career. I understand why, and like I said, their young guys played, [Torey] Krug, Dougie Hamilton, [Reilly] Smith, they played great. You’€™ve got to have room for them, Looch, the list goes on. So I understand.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Colorado Avalanche, David Krejci, Jarome Iginla
Bruins react to Johnny Boychuk trade and its ‘reality check’ impact going forward 10.05.14 at 10:41 am ET
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With the season opening at home Wednesday against the Flyers, the Bruins don’t have long to be upset about the loss of one of their best teammates.

Still, even coach Claude Julien said after Saturday’s preseason finale that the team will take a little time to get over “the sting” of losing Johnny Boychuk ($3.37 million) to the harsh realities of today’s salary cap NHL.

Torey Krug, just 23, now understands just how important managing the salary cap is for each team after spending most of the summer without a contract because GM Peter Chiarelli couldn’t fit him under the cap. Krug and Reilly Smith had to wait all summer and through most of camp to sign their $1.4 million deals because the team couldn’t sign them.

“[It’s] another lesson in the business for me,” said Krug. “I learned a few things this summer for sure, and it’€™s always going to be part of it forever as long as this game exists and the cap situation exists in this sport, so it’€™s tough to see him go for sure.”

Several defenseman will have to pick up the slack for Boychuk and will have the opportunity to step right in play a bigger role for the 30-year-old who was considered one of the heart-and-soul parts of their Stanley Cup run in 2011 and their finals appearance in 2013.

Adam McQuaid, Matt Bartkowski and Torey Krug are all younger than Boychuk and all will likely get chances to play alongside Dennis Seidenberg on Boston’s No. 2 D-pairing.

“I mean it’€™s been like this the last few years so it doesn’€™t really change anything,” Seidenberg said. “For me, it’€™s just trying to play wherever they put me and trying to do it well.”

“I didn’€™t know that’€”there was some talk about different things and stuff but I was pretty much shocked,” McQuaid said in reacting Saturday. “I don’€™t know, I guess maybe we all just kind of had that hope in the back of our minds that somehow we could all stay. He’€™s a guy that’€™s a huge part of this team and for me a guy that always put a smile on my face every day. Always came to the rink in a good mood and was cracking jokes. I think I’€™ve played seven pro seasons and six have been with Johnny so we’€™ve been through a lot together. He’€™s a guy that’€”I don’€™t think it’€™s really sunk in quite yet’€”but a guy that will be sorely missed.”

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Read More: Adam McQuaid, Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk
Claude Julien: Johnny Boychuk trade ‘stings for everybody’ 10.04.14 at 11:06 pm ET
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Claude Julien had to process the loss of Johnny Boychuk just like everyone else. And it wasn’t easy.

“I don’€™t think my thoughts differ from anybody else,” Julien said after his team’s 4-3 shootout loss to the Red Wings Saturday night. “I think we’€™re all disappointed to see him leave. As I mentioned, Peter [Chiarelli] eluded to that in his press conference. It stings for everybody. He was a good player, he was a good person, very well liked.

“Unfortunately our game is in that position where sometimes we’€™re forced to make those unpopular decisions. For a coaching staff, we’€™ll miss him like everybody else. But we have a job to do, and we feel we have a lot of good players here that we can certainly overcome this. And that’€™s just the way it goes, and part of hockey, and part of a tough day. You hope we’€™ll be able to turn the page here and by the time we start the season we’€™ll be ready to go.”

That position, of course, is a result of a salary cap squeeze, brought on – in part – with the signing of David Krejci. Now, the 30-year-old Boychuk (due $3.4 million in the final year of his three-year contract) will head to the Islanders while Julien is left to find a replacement to pair with Dennis Seidenberg.

He has several options, starting with Matt Bartkowski. Adam McQuaid, Dougie Hamilton and Torey Krug will also be asked to carry a bigger load.

“I think there’€™s no doubt that the experience those young guys got was valuable,” Julien said. “But at the same time, we’€™ve got to remember that we’€™ve got Seidenberg, we’€™ve got McQuaid back in our lineup, which is two more veterans. That certainly helps that youth maybe not be so young. So those are things. But the guys that got that experience ‘€“ you’€™re talking about Bartkowski, talking about Krug, you know Dougie Hamilton. I think those things will certainly pay off for us.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Johnny Boychuk,
Charlie Jacobs on a window of opportunity for Bruins: ‘I do believe we’ll be right back there’ 05.20.14 at 2:55 pm ET
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With a talented core and a young group of complimentary players in the fold, Bruins management and ownership feels there won’t be a drop-off in performance for while.

As a matter of fact, owner Jeremy Jacobs, son Charlie and team president Cam Neely said Tuesday during their season-ending media availability that there’s no reason to think the Bruins aren’t poised for another run at the Stanley Cup in 2015.

“[There’s] a tremendous amount of confidence in our both on-ice leadership and off-the-ice leadership,” Charlie Jacobs said. “A lot of character in our dressing room, and it starts with Zee [Zdeno Chara], but listen ‘€” there are a lot of complimentary pieces, and when you consider Patrice [Bergeron] and Krech [David Krejci], and we may have lost something with Andy Ference but we picked it up with Jarome [Iginla]. And then there’€™s a lot of character and leadership, and they held each other accountable, and you saw in your exit interviews ‘€” they all felt as though they maybe didn’€™t necessarily play their best but they let the team down, and that meant more to them than, say, their individual stats. And I think that speaks volumes about the mentality in the locker room itself, and that’€™s what you aspire to have.”

The Bruins reportedly did suffer a bit of a hit Tuesday with word that assistant general manager Jim Benning has been named general manager of the Vancouver Canucks, replacing the fired Mike Gillis.

“In terms of our organizational leadership, I think with Cam [Neely] and Peter [Chiarelli] and Don Sweeney and Jim [Benning], they’€™ve done a great job of really trying to assemble a mixture of both veteran and some young leadership to bring us back to the promised-land,” Charlie Jacobs added. “And you need that mix. You need the right mix. We maybe erred a bit, a little bit, in terms of having too many inexperienced defensemen. If you think about it, really only two of them ‘€” two veterans on the back line this postseason. But as my dad referred to, that will pay dividends as you progress moving forward. So listen, I have great faith in both aspects. I do believe we’€™ll be right back there. I expect that we’€™ll be back there. Stranger things have happened, but I hope we start right out of the gate where we left off in March, not necessarily at the end of April.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Cam Neely, Charlie Jacobs, Jeremy Jacobs
Jeremy Jacobs has no intention of selling Bruins to buy NFL’s Buffalo Bills: ‘I kind of like where I am’ 05.20.14 at 2:14 pm ET
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When Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs expressed interest in buying the Buffalo Bills in April, after the passing of longtime owner Ralph Wilson, Bruins fans wondered if that meant the end of his stewardship of the NHL franchise.

Tuesday, during a 25-minute address to reporters at TD Garden, Jacobs made it clear that he has no such intentions and is quite happy as the owner of the “Original Six” franchise.

“Well, I can’€™t buy the Bills, because I own the Bruins,” Jacobs said, referring to the NFL by-laws that prohibit owning teams in different cities. “That’€™s not a bad place to be. I kind of like where I am.”

Jacobs is among the wealthiest and most successful businessmen in the world, owning the Delaware North Companies, with an individual net worth of approximately $3.1 billion. Jacobs was initially among a group of several Western New York businessmen reported to be interested in the Bills. Another businessman reportedly interested was real estate tycoon Donald Trump.

Jacobs has owned the Bruins since 1975. Jacobs also represents the club on the NHL‘s Board of Governors and serves on its Executive Committee. At the NHL Board of Governors meeting in June 2007, Jacobs was elected Chairman of the Board, replacing the Calgary Flames‘ Harley Hotchkiss.

Jacobs made changes in management of the Bruins, with the retirement of veteran team president Harry Sinden from active management of the team into an advisory capacity. New management included Peter Chiarelli and head coach Claude Julien. Cam Neely, who was on the dais Tuesday with Jacobs and Jacobs’ son Charlie, was also lured back to the new organization and subsequently named as President of the team.

Since 2008, the Bruins have made playoffs every year, winning the Stanley Cup in 2011, reaching the Cup finals in 2013 and winning the Presidents’ Trophy this past season as the team with the best record and most points (117).

Read More: Boston Bruins, Buffalo Bills, Cam Neely, Charlie Jacobs
Patrice Bergeron can’t understand lack of effort in Game 7: ‘There’s no words to explain it’ 05.15.14 at 12:25 am ET
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Patrice Bergeron stood in front of his locker and searched for the words that never really came. How did the Bruins lay such an egg in Game 7 with their 54-win, 117-point season in the balance?

“You can’€™t really, there’€™s no words to explain it,” Bergeron said. “Obviously got to give them credit, but we didn’t execute and we didn’t score the goals that we needed to get the momentum or whatever.”

From the moment the Canadiens’ Dale Weise took a pass from Danny Briere and beat Tuukka Rask, with Matt Bartkowski looking on, the Bruins looked demoralized.

“That first goal definitely sucked the energy out of us and it was hard to get it back,” Bergeron said. “We had some shifts that we did, but again, all in all, when we had some good chances they scored that second goal again. And bottom line, we’ve got to execute and score. Like I just said, we’ve got to definitely give them some credit where they deserve it, but we’ve got to be better.

“I don’€™t know if it was nerves, I think we’ve been there before, but yeah, definitely not the start that we needed. And that goal definitely took that energy out of us.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, NHL, Patrice Bergeron
Milan Lucic vents after Dale Weise says Bruins forward was threatening Habs 05.14.14 at 10:43 pm ET
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No one was more furious with Canadiens playing the disrespect card after a 3-1 Game 7 win over the Bruins than Milan Lucic. Then again, the Canadiens weren’t exactly happy with Lucic. Specifically, Habs forward Dale Weise said that Lucic was threatening players in the handshake line.

 

Lucic was as upset with Weise sharing their exchange with the media.

“That’s said on the ice, so it’ll stay on the ice,” Lucic said. “So if he wants to be a baby about it, he can make it public.”

The Canadiens had said over the last two days that they felt disrespected by the Bruins throughout the series. Boston celebrated goals with a chest-pound — something Claude Julien said after the series was meant to be a “Boston Strong” gesture — while Shawn Thornton squirted P.K. Subban with a water bottle at the end of Game 5.

The Bruins were confused by the Habs’ overuse of the word “disrespect,” but Lucic was furious.

“Disrespect? I don’t know what they’re talking about,” Lucic vented. “Disrespect? Having a goal celebration, what kind of disrespect is that? I’m not going to say anything. I’ve got nothing to say about that.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Dale Weise, Milan Lucic, Montreal Canadiens
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