Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Tim Thomas is perfectly happy with the way he’s playing, so is Claude Julien 06.05.11 at 6:13 pm ET
By   |  3 Comments

Default Player for embeding in WEEI.com columns and blogs.


brightcove.createExperiences();

Tim Thomas made one thing pretty clear Sunday.

He’s not about to change his aggressive approach in goal now.

The 2009 Vezina Trophy winner was outstanding in Game 1 and for most of Game 2 before allowing the game-tying goal with over 10 minutes left in regulation and a bizarre goal 11 seconds into overtime when he fell down chasing Alex Burrows.

Upon his arrival back in Boston Sunday afternoon at the Garden, Thomas was asked about whether he regrets his aggressive approach or plans on adjusting his tact in goal.

“I have a pretty good idea how to play goalie,” Thomas said at the beginning of the press conference. “I’m not going to take advice or suggestions at this time. I’m just going to keep playing the way I have.”

Following a five-hour flight back from Vancouver, Thomas and the rest of the Bruins came to the Garden briefly to check into their dressing room and fulfill a media obligation on the offday between Games 2 and 3 of the Stanley Cup finals.

“I think we’ve played in front of Timmy Thomas,” coach Claude Julien said. “To me, he’s a Vezina Trophy winner. We are here right now because his contribution has been really good. For us to be sitting here having to answer those questions is ridiculous to me. He’s won a Vezina Trophy already, he’s probably going to win one this year, in my mind anyway, for what he’s done. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup, 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Alex Burrows, Andrew Ference
Bruins notes Monday: Claude Julien pumps up the volume and Rich Peverley gets the gold 05.30.11 at 4:55 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Default Player for embeding in WEEI.com columns and blogs.


brightcove.createExperiences();

The Bruins held their final practice before departing for Vancouver in preparation for Wednesday’s opening game of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals at Rogers Arena.

Every player was on the ice – with the exception of defenseman Shane Hnidy – for the 45-minute skate that began at 11:35 and ended with several laps of hard skating around the rink, which was covered in a thin haze of fog by the end of the session. It was the first day back on the ice for several players since winning Game 7 Friday night against Tampa Bay.

“Conditioning doesn’t go bad,” coach Claude Julien said. “We came back on the ice, and then as a whole team, it was obviously a little warm out there today. So, the ice was probably not at its best and it was a tough grind to push through this practice today, which I think is not a bad thing because we might as well get used to it.

“That’s what the buildings are like on game nights. I thought we pushed ourselves pretty good today and did a little bit of sprints at the end to make sure we raise the volume, if you want, and [Tuesday] hopefully, we’ll be really good and flying out there in Vancouver and getting ready for Wednesday.”

Shawn Thornton took shifts on the fourth line with Daniel Paille and Gregory Campbell, otherwise known as the “Merlot” line.

“They don’t get the same amount of ice time those others do,” Julien said. “And with Thorty not having played, I think it was important for them to get a regular turn at practice. And those other guys play a lot. Whether it’s Mark who we like to give a rest at times, or Bergy, who plays a lot, we kind of rotate through that. I wouldn’t read more into it than it was.”

Wearing a gold sweater, Rich Peverley skated with the regular second-line unit of Patrice Bergeron, Mark Recchi and Brad Marchand.

Julien moved Peverley up to the second shift during Friday’s Game 7 against Tampa Bay, replacing Recchi at times to give the line added speed with Bergeron.

Peverley told WEEI.com’s Scott McLaughlin he’s totally fine with moving from line to line, especially at this time of year.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup, 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien
Claude Julien won’t touch that Stanley Cup till ‘he’s earned it’ 05.30.11 at 2:44 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Bruins coach Claude Julien admitted Monday to one of the long-standing traditions of NHL coaches and players who compete in the Stanley Cup playoffs. Julien said he has avoided coming in direct contact with the oldest trophy in North American professional sports and will keep from having his picture taken with it until he’s earned that privilege by winning it.

“I have [avoided the Stanley Cup],” Julien said following the Bruins final skate before departing for Vancouver and Game 1 of the finals on Wednesday. “I’ve seen it in the Hall of Fame in Toronto. I have stayed away from it. And all I said is the day that I even get a picture or touch it will be the day that I’ve earned it. And that’s been my philosophy throughout my career as a coach.”

Julien is coaching in his first Stanley Cup finals in eight seasons as a coach, and fourth in Boston.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Finals, 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien
Bruins fans agree: ‘We want the Cup!’ 05.30.11 at 2:12 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Default Player for embeding in WEEI.com columns and blogs.


brightcove.createExperiences();

Approximately 2,000 raucous fans attended a rally outside TD Garden to send off the Bruins as they left for Vancouver and the opening of the Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday night in British Columbia.

Fans chanted “We want the Cup!” over and over as players and coaches signed autographs before hopping on charter buses for Logan Airport and a cross-continent, six-hour flight to Vancouver.

“I just wanted to support the team,” said Mike Cifrino of Hingham. “Bring back the Cup.”

Reminded that Vancouver won the President’s Trophy for posting the best record in the regular season, Cifrino said that doesn’t change his expectations for a close series.

“Some hard-fought games,” he added. “It’€™s going to be a defensive game, I think.”

Autographs weren’t the main priority for his son but rather getting multi-media opportunities.

“My son got a lot of videos of his favorite players,” Cifrino said. “We just can’€™t wait to have them back in Boston.”

The Bruins play Games 1 and 2 Wednesday and Saturday in Vancouver before returning to Boston for Games 3 and 4 next Monday and Wednesday.

The team held its final skate in Boston at the Garden amidst light fog on the ice before leaving for Vancouver. The team will take part in media day in Vancouver Tuesday, with Game 1 set for Wednesday night at 8 p.m. ET.

WEEI.com’s Scott McLaughlin contributed to this report.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Finals, 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien
Zdeno Chara: Mentally tough B’s had ‘mindset’ to beat Dwayne Roloson 05.28.11 at 1:14 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

Default Player for embeding in WEEI.com columns and blogs.


brightcove.createExperiences();

While Dwayne Roloson was putting forth the performance of a lifetime – epic by even Stanley Cup playoff standards – it was fair to wonder if it just wasn’t meant to be for the Bruins in Game 7.

But for these Bruins, thankfully, that question never even entered their mind. That’s essentially why they were finally able to beat the apparently unbeatable 41-year-old goalie for one Nathan Horton tally with 7:33 left and make it stand in a Game 7 1-0 win for the ages that sends them to the Stanley Cup finals.

“We’ve had a few games like that, even in regular season,” Bruins captain Zdeno Chara said. “To have that performance in Game 7, it’s just nice to see. Everybody bought into it. It was really a strong mindset before the game, throughout the whole game. I was very impressed the way we played and never changed anything.”

Even when David Krejci pulled out all the tricks with point-blank shots and spin-o-ramas and Brad Marchand was firing shots on from great passes from Patrice Bergeron in the second period.

“We talked about it between periods, just stick with it, stick with it and eventually, it did happen,” Chara said. “It’s something you have to do that to be able to accomplish something. Everybody has to play the same way. It’s a team discipline.”

Chara and the Bruins were being denied time after time by Roloson, a goalie, who entering Game 7, was 7-0 in elimination games in his career, including four wins in these 2011 playoffs, alone. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Dwayne Roloson, Milan Lucic
Tim Thomas and the Bruins have waited a long time for this 05.28.11 at 12:41 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

Tim Thomas has waited his whole career to get to this point and now the Bruins goalie will have the chance to play on hockey’s biggest stage and play for the most famous trophy in all of North American sports. Thomas stopped all 24 shots Friday night, posting his second shutout of the playoffs and third career in the postseason, in Boston’s 1-0 win that sends them to the Stanley Cup finals starting Wednesday in Vancouver.

“This is a great moment,” the 37-year-old Thomas said. “There’s no doubt about it. When’s the last time Boston’s been to the Stanley Cup finals? Twenty-one years. It’s been a long time for Boston, it’s been a long journey for me to get here. Now, you want to take advantage of this opportunity. There’s more work to be done. Unfortunately, that’s the way it is. You can’t ever be too happy for too long until you’re the last man standing.

“They had to earn. We pressured them, offensively. The only reason it was a 1-0 game was because of Dwayne Roloson. He played an incredible game.”

Roloson stopped the first 34 shots he faced before Nathan Horton put one past him with 7:33 left in the third for the deciding goal in the Eastern Conference finals.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Dwayne Roloson, Nathan Horton, NHL
Patrice Bergeron: It’s not all on the officials 05.26.11 at 1:07 am ET
By   |  1 Comment

p


brightcove.createExperiences();

TAMPA — Despite the suggestion by Claude Julien that the officials may have been influenced by Lightning coach Guy Boucher, center Patrice Bergeron said the Bruins need to take some responsibility for surrendering three power play goals.

“We have to stay disciplined against a team like them,” Bergeron said. “Tonight, they did a good job on their power play but still, we could’ve been better on the power play.

“Obviously, there were a couple after the whistle and a couple during the play. There were a couple of interference [calls] and we were just trying to make some room for our teammate but they were selling it good. At the same time, we have to make sure to stay out of the penalty box and stay disciplined. That’s a key against them.”

The Bruins had killed off 11 straight Tampa Bay power play chances before allowing three straight in second and third periods. The Bruins went 1-for-5 on the power play, including their first man advantage goal on the road in 26 tries.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, NHL
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines