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Claude Julien shows the desire he wishes he’d get from his team 12.20.10 at 11:19 pm ET
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Claude Julien had seen enough.

There was the back-to-back losses last week in Buffalo and Montreal. There was Saturday night when he watched his team get outshot on home ice, 38-10, after taking a 3-0 lead over Washington, barely holding on for a 3-2 win.

The Bruins were outshot by an amazing 26-2 in the third period and it was clear from Julien’s tone Saturday night that he felt his team was fortunate – if not lucky – to win. On Monday, there was no such luck. The Bruins fell behind 2-0 before having a breakdown on the power play in front of Tim Thomas, allowing a short-handed goal that all but cooked their goose in a 3-0 loss to the Ducks at TD Garden. Julien needed to let loose and let his team have the what-for.

“Our compete level needed to be better,” Julien began. “I’m disappointed. I’m really disappointed in our effort tonight and it’s not something we should be proud of and we should be willing to try to redeem ourselves next game and find some more emotion and more intensity in our game.”

That next game is the game before Christmas, Thursday night at home against Atlanta. In the meantime, there’ll be a pair of practices which should test the quality of the practice ice in Wilmington.

Julien said while it was good that his team put 45 shots on Jonas Hiller, he said his players “need to bury those chances.”

Julien even used a classic hockey expression to express his displeasure of the lack of desire from his team, particularly his forwards.

“It’s starts with the forecheck,” Julien said. “We had a lot of guys playing at the end of of their sticks. When you’re trying to move up five spots [in the standings], that’s unacceptable.”

The Bruins coach said he’s noticed a lack of emotion and energy in his team in the last week.

“Through the course of the season, certain things will creep into your game,” Julien said. “And that’s crept into our game and we’ve got to get rid of that. We have to get that emotion again, give yourself a chance to win. And we didn’t do that tonight.”

The Bruins entered the game with the same number of points (38) as their opponent but it wasn’t the Ducks they were chasing in the standings. With a win, the Bruins could have jumped from eight in the conference to tied for third, as they would have 40 points, matching the Canadiens.

“We had all the reasons in the world to want to compete tonight, an opportunity to move up five spots [in Eastern Conference] and we didn’t have enough guys going tonight, there’s no doubt there,” Julien said.

Read More: Anaheim Ducks, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Montreal Canadiens
Tim Thomas saved the sleepwalking Bruins 12.19.10 at 1:21 am ET
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There was a great deal of irony in the words of Tim Thomas following his latest Houdini act on Saturday night at TD Garden.

The Bruins held on for a 3-2 win over the slumping Capitals, a win that snapped Boston’s three-game losing streak while extending Washington’s to an almost unbelievable eight.

But that hardly tells the story.

Thomas noticed early on the Capitals were asleep at the wheel. But it was the Bruins who nearly blew the game by sleepwalking through the final 20 minutes.

The Bruins ran the Capitals off the ice in the opening 20 minutes. They got goals from Patrice Bergeron, Andrew Ference and Blake Wheeler and Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau was in the midst of another breakdown for HBO’s “24/7 The Road to the NHL Winter Classic.” But Thomas figured it was too good to last.

“I didn’€™t know what we were going to get,” Thomas said. “They turned it up for a while in the second there and then they kind of went back to sleep a little bit and I didn’€™t know if… They looked like a tired team for the first two periods and I was hoping that was the case, but it turned out not to be.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Blake Wheeler, Boston Bruins, Bruce Boudreau, Claude Julien
Tim Thomas is already thinking Stanley Cup playoffs 12.08.10 at 11:55 am ET
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The veterans on the Bruins who have been around the block a few times realize that Tuesday night’s 3-2 overtime win against Buffalo was just another win in December. But they also realize that it’s significant for one very important reason.

When you get to April and May and the Stanley Cup playoffs, there are no shootouts and you need to find a way to win overtime games. Another satisfying aspect of this early-December win was the fact the Bruins trailed 2-1 against Ryan Miller – one of the best goalies in the sport – with less than seven minutes remaining in regulation. So before winning in overtime the Bruins had to force the extra period.

The Bruins took advantage of a turnover in front of the Buffalo net and Nathan Horton scored his second goal in as many games to tie the game, 2-2. Again, just like April and May, teams with Cup aspirations need to find a way to just force overtime when you’re down a goal.

“I mean just to come back being down two to one in the third period, but then to finish it off that’€™s the key because I mean if… theoretically every game that you play in is a Stanley Cup run there are no shootouts in the Stanley Cup playoffs, you need to find a way to win that in overtime,” Bruins goalie Tim Thomas said. “So that’€™s what we did tonight and that’€™s a good thing.”

And you need your goalie to make big saves in overtime – just like Thomas did on Derek Roy on the doorstep just 40 seconds into the overtime. And in the Stanley Cup playoffs, you get bizarre circumstances – like scoring the winning goal, only to have play continue for about a minute before a stoppage and video review confirmed Mark Recchi‘s game-winning deflection off Dennis Seidenberg‘s blast from the high slot.

“I don’€™t know if I have ever been a part of a game like that,” Thomas said. “I’€™ve seen it on TV and stuff a couple times and actually by the time we actually got a whistle I’€™d forgotten about that goal. So, when I happened to glance up, I didn’€™t get to see if the puck went in on the replay but the crowd was happy, so I just started celebrating hoping that the crowd was right.”

Claude Julien knows Tuesday was important for another reason – his team won a game in overtime, with the help of offensive-minded defensemen Seidenberg and Zdeno Chara on the power play.

“It’€™s been tough for us, I think, in that area. Number one, as you saw, we used three forwards and one D to try to get some more offense on that five-minute overtime, four-on-four,” Julien said. “Most of our offense has been coming from up front. At the same time, we haven’€™t been very good in shootouts. We don’€™t have a very good percentage as a group, so I guess, for the time being, you try to adjust and try and put the odds on your side. We went that way and ended up on the power play and were able to score.”

Recchi added final perspective on the significance of the December win.

“It’€™s important,” Recchi said. “We’€™d like not to get [to overtime], but if we do get there then you’€™ve got to be good and you’€™ve got to be sharp. We use our bench very well, so guys are pretty fresh when it comes and we don’€™t have over-tired people. It’€™s good. Timmy [Thomas] came off a big save and then we were able to capitalize on the power play.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Buffalo, Tim Thomas,
Mark Stuart to be evaluated for ‘upper body injury’ 12.07.10 at 11:01 pm ET
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It’s the dreaded “upper body injury” for Bruins defenseman Mark Stuart.

Stuart played just four shifts in the first period Tuesday night before suffering an undisclosed ailment, according to Bruins coach Claude Julien.

“He’ll be evaluated and let you know [Wednesday],” Julien said. “We’ll give you more [Wednesday] and he needs to be evaluated. We need to give you the right information.”

The Bruins defenseman totaled three minutes, 56 seconds on the ice in the first period before being forced out of the game. The Bruins practice Wednesday in Wilmington before hosting the New York Islanders on Thursday night at TD Garden. Julien did not speculate on Stuart’s availability on Thursday or Saturday, when the Bruins host the Flyers.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Buffalo Sabres, Claude Julien, Mark Stuart
What the return of Marc Savard really means to the Bruins 12.03.10 at 11:08 am ET
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Less than an hour after the Bruins croaked the Tampa Bay Lightning, 8-1, at TD Garden, Bruins coach Claude Julien was asked if the team was given an emotional boost by the return of Marc Savard after a bout of post-concussion syndrome.

“Boy, you’€™re giving him a lot of credit, aren’€™t you?” Julien quipped in his classically wry sense of humor. “It’€™s nice to have him back, obviously everybody’€™s happy to have him back, but you know, I think our players, as a whole, even yesterday when he wasn’€™t in the lineup, decided that they were going to play hard and play well and they did. So he just added to that, I guess, fuel for tonight.”

Savard skated 21 shifts in 15 minutes and 45 seconds, taking one shot while winning 5-of-10 face-offs on the night. But his impact was felt early when he got into the fray early with a fore-check. He played on several combo lines and everyone thought he didn’t miss a beat.

“I mean, he brought a lot of offense today,” two-goal scorer David Krejci said. “He wasn’€™t on the score sheet but he had a lot of last minute chances. We have big depth now with him and all four lines can score goals and it’€™s hard for their top defensemen to defend our top guys. So, it’€™s good to have him back and it’€™s good to see him and hopefully we will keep doing the same thing we did tonight.”

And that can only help this Bruins offense. It certainly appeared that way Thursday night.

“I think that’€™s the first eight goals the team has scored that I haven’€™t had anything on it, but I kept telling Claude I was a presence tonight,” Savard said BEFORE Julien’s post-game observation. “I felt good, obviously had some shifts where I felt a little tired and as the battles wore on, I just stood in front of Timmy [Thomas], so hopefully he can stop it. It was great to be back. The fans were fantastic. I got a little emotional there. It was a little tough to go out on that shift there, but it was special.”

Tim Thomas set the tone for the night, stepping aside before leading the team on the ice for pre-game warm-ups. Instead, Savard had that honor against Tampa Bay.

“I didn’€™t know what he was doing there. I didn’€™t even realize. I just thought he was stepping aside, that’€™s maybe what he does now. I just kept skating, then I looked over and no one was there, so it was kind of nice of the guys, I think they did that on purpose, but it was funny.”

Still, for skating in a game for the first time since May, it was quite the adjustment for Savard.

“I mean, it’€™s been six months, so it’€™s been a long time,” Savard said. “Shaking off a bit of rust, but you know, I felt I made some good plays. I felt there’€™s some stuff I can build off of, some things I can work on still, obviously. Battles I had a little trouble as the shift wore on in our zone a couple times, but I felt good, I felt strong. I got in there a couple times, tried to bang around, didn’€™t really move anybody, but it was a lot of fun.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Krejci, Marc Savard, NHL
Dennis Seidenberg on Marco Sturm: ‘He agreed to waive’ no-trade 12.02.10 at 11:38 pm ET
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Life in the NHL – or any sport for that matter – can be unsettling. Just ask Marco Sturm, or his Bruins teammate and fellow German countryman Dennis Seidenberg.

Just hours after multiple media reports had Bruins forward Marco Sturm waiving his no-trade clause and being traded to the Los Angeles Kings, the Bruins made a formal effort to put the brakes on the story. Immediately following Thursday’s win over Tampa, the team – through GM Peter Chiarelli – released a statement on the report that they had traded Sturm to the Los Angeles Kings.

“I am aware of the various media reports today regarding Marco Sturm,” said Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli. “I can confirm that I spoke to Marco about waiving his no trade clause and have had discussions regarding Marco with other teams. I can also confirm that there is no trade in place with Marco. At this time, Marco is a member of the Boston Bruins and will continue to train with our team.”

Seidenberg said he spoke with Sturm earlier in the day and said Sturm confirmed to him that he had waived the no-trade. Now, Seidenberg and the rest of the team await the next move as Sturm’s future with the team appears in limbo.

“It is very tough, everybody loves Marco here,” Seidenberg said following the 8-1 thrashing of the Lightning. “He’s been a big part of our organization and he’s a great guy and I think any time you see a guy leave, especially in an awkward situation right now, it’s just tough.”

Seidenberg said he spoke to Sturm before Thursday’s game and he was under the impression that Sturm had already accepted the deal to L.A.

“He told me he agreed to waive it,” Seidenberg said. “I don’t know what’s going on. I haven’t talked to him since.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Los Angeles Kings, Marco Sturm
Tim Thomas: ‘It’s time to start righting the ship’ 11.15.10 at 11:40 pm ET
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Tim Thomas was happy to admit that his fourth shutout of the season was a collective effort. Thanks to the blocked shots of Dennis Seidenberg and captain Zdeno Chara effectively rubbing out Ilya Kovalchuk and Patrick Elias, Thomas faced just 28 shots and stopped them all in a 3-0 win over the Devils Monday night at TD Garden.

But that wasn’t the biggest story. The Bruins managed to put three pucks behind future Hall of Famer Martin Brodeur, one more than they scored during an unlikely three-game home ice losing skid.

“There was definitely a little urgency but it was a controlled urgency,” Thomas said. “It wasn’t a panicked urgency. It was more like, ‘Hey, it’s time to start righting the ship and tonight’s a good place to start.’”

The Bruins were just 2-4-1 on home ice this season.

“I personally approached it as a must-win and I think the team did too,” Thomas said. “We need to get back on track; we need to show some urgency. We faced a team that’€™s been playing better but has struggled this year, and we needed to come out with the win so that we could start building and getting back to the game that we were playing when we were having success.”

Thomas did face pressure at times, like late in the second period when the Devils fired the last six shots of the period.

“Yeah, that and the first couple minutes of the game there,” Thomas said. “Elias was very, very patient. You know, there was some times where we really controlled the play for long periods of time and there were other times where they made a push and I just had to be on my toes and the team had to be on their toes for the rebounds.”

The way it played out, Thomas weathered the storm at the start, and had pretty much clear sailing the rest of the way.

“I don’€™t know, well, you could look at it either way. Yeah, it could be tough, or looking back, it actually could help get me into the game,” Thomas said. “And it happened so quick that I didn’€™t have time to think about it. I didn’€™t have time to think, ‘€œIs this really happening in the first minute of the game?’€ It was just like, ‘€œI got to find some way to stop this thing.’€

“It’s a similar feeling to how I felt against Washington, probably early this year was the closest that I kind of felt like that. I just felt like they weren’€™t going to find a way to score.”

As the minutes wound down, he could sense he was closing in on his 21st career shutout, just 91 shy of his counterpart Monday night.

“The last several minutes you start to put some emphasis because you don’€™t want to work that hard and not get it,” Thomas said. “I used to not care about shutouts and I still don’€™t for the most part, but that was 21 and 25 is a milestone that few people reach in the NHL.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils
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