Big Bad Blog AT&T
WEEI.com Blog Network
Torey Krug ends 26-game goal drought, insists he wasn’t ‘too worried’ about it 11.14.15 at 11:41 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Torey Krug ends 26-game goal drought, insists he wasn’t ‘too worried’ about it
Torey Krug celebrates his first goal of the season. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Torey Krug celebrates his first goal of the season. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

On his 44th shot on goal of the season, Torey Krug finally scored his first goal. Dating back to last season, it was his first goal in 27 games, ending the longest drought of his young career.

If Krug were a forward, this would all be a pretty big deal. Given that he’s an offensive defensemen who has scored 26 goals over the last two season, it’s still at least noteworthy. Krug insists he wasn’t giving the drought much thought, though.

“I wasn’t really too worried about it, especially with a few more minutes being played,” Krug said. “My number one job is always defense and that’s been good so far. I can always improve, but it’s nice to get the first one.”

Krug is right, of course. Even if he is an offensive defenseman, he is still, first and foremost, a defenseman. In the past, it was easy to overlook that fact. Krug was often used in situations that catered to his strengths and shielded his question marks (he got a lot of offensive zone starts and faced mostly third and fourth lines), so his defensive game wasn’t exactly facing tough tests.

This season has been different, though. Krug hasn’t been nearly as sheltered as he has been in the past. Given the lack of true top-four defensemen on the Boston blue line, Krug has had to play a bigger role. According to war-on-ice.com, Krug has an offensive zone start percentage of 53.25 percent this year vs. 59.97 percent last year, and only Zdeno Chara has faced tougher quality of competition among Bruins defensemen. Oh, and Krug is second on the B’s in average time on ice (again behind only Chara).

Krug said he has embraced the challenge and pointed out that playing against first and second lines might actually suit his game in a way people wouldn’t necessarily notice.

“You go out there and play hockey that is more suitable to my type of game,” Krug said. “Playing against top-two line guys, they think the same way that I think. How hockey should be played — it’s more fun to play that.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Torey Krug,
Brad Marchand named NHL’s first star of week, David Krejci named third star of month 11.02.15 at 3:58 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Brad Marchand named NHL’s first star of week, David Krejci named third star of month

The Boston Bruins have won six of their last seven games, and Brad Marchand and David Krejci have been a big part of the recent success. On Monday the NHL recognized them for their efforts, naming Marchand the league’s first star of the week and Krejci the third star of the month for October.

Marchand registered four goals and two assists in wins over the Arizona Coyotes, Florida Panthers and Tampa Bay Lightning last week. He beat out St. Louis Blues goalie Jake Allen and Edmonton Oilers left wing Taylor Hall for the top weekly honor.

Krejci currently ranks second in the NHL in points per game with 15 points (7 goals, 8 assists) in 10 games. Prior to Saturday’s game against the Lightning, he had found the scoresheet in every game this season. Krejci’s 1.50 points per game are second only to the Dallas Stars’ Jamie Benn (1.55), who was named first star of the month. Montreal Canadiens goalie Carey Price, who is 7-2-0 with a .936 save percentage, was named the second star.

Claude Julien ‘disappointed’ by no-goal ruling, but says he won’t hesitate to use challenge in future 10.10.15 at 11:24 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Claude Julien ‘disappointed’ by no-goal ruling, but says he won’t hesitate to use challenge in future

Claude Julien and the Bruins got their first taste of the NHL‘€™s new coach’€™s challenge Saturday night, and they came away from the experience more confused than anything.

The play and review seemed pretty straightforward. The refs waved off a Loui Eriksson goal because Patrice Bergeron made contact with Carey Price. However, Bergeron was clearly pushed into Price by Alexei Emelin, meaning the goal should have been allowed.

It was understandable that the refs missed it in real time; hockey is a fast game and sometimes you just don’€™t catch that push. But once Julien decided to use his challenge, it seemed like a pretty safe bet that the no-goal call would be overturned.

Instead, the refs upheld the call on the ice. Why they upheld it remains a mystery, with the league’€™s official statement saying simply that the review “confirmed that Boston’€™s Patrice Bergeron made incidental contact with Montreal goaltender Carey Price before the puck crossed the goal line, preventing Price from doing his job in the crease.”€ No mention of Emelin’€™s shove. No mention of the fact that Bergeron actually made an effort to stay out of the crease while getting pushed.

Julien said he was “disappointed” with the call and didn’€™t understand why it wasn’€™t a goal.

“I really felt, and I looked at it in between periods, and I said how can that not be a goal when the guy has both feet outside the blue paint and is doing everything he can to stay out of his way and is really trying to fight off the guy trying to push him in,” Julien said. “So, I thought that warranted obviously a goal, but for some reason they saw it some other way.”

Goalie interference plays are one of two things coaches can challenge (with goals scored on a potential offsides being the other), and Julien said it’€™s his understanding that whether or not a player was pushed into the goalie is part of what can be reviewed, which would rule out the possibility that the refs could only look at Bergeron’€™s contact with Price and not how he got there.

Bergeron couldn’€™t make sense of the ruling either, as he also thought that being pushed into Price should’€™ve negated the interference.

“That was my understanding of the rule,” Bergeron said. “They thought otherwise and we can’€™t really control that, I guess. … It happens fast, so I guess I understood that maybe he thought that I pushed into the goalie. But then on the replay, I thought it was clear that I got pushed into him. My understanding was that if I get pushed into the goalie and I’€™m working hard to get out of there, it’€™s fine.”

Julien said that despite the fact that this challenge didn’€™t go the way he expected, he wouldn’€™t hesitate to challenge a similar situation in the future.

“€œThat’€™s a thing you’€™ve got to be careful of — you can’€™t [be discouraged],”€ Julien said. “In our minds, the people that looked at it in the first place all felt it should have been a goal, and I went back to my office in between periods and I felt it should have been a goal. But if you’€™re afraid to call those then you may miss an opportunity to either get a goal called for you or the other way around, a goal rescinded from what you think was interference.”

The disallowed goal certainly isn’€™t the reason the Bruins lost Saturday. More turnovers, more defensive mistakes and an inability to get the puck out of their own zone had a lot more to do with Saturday night’€™s 4-2 loss than that one call. But there’€™s no denying that it was a turning point of sorts, especially since the Canadiens scored just over a minute later to make it 3-0.

Read More: Claude Julien, Loui Eriksson, Patrice Bergeron,
Bruins’ worst fears realized as inexperienced defense struggles mightily in loss to Jets 10.08.15 at 11:51 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Bruins’ worst fears realized as inexperienced defense struggles mightily in loss to Jets
Matt Irwin was a minus-3 Thursday night. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Matt Irwin was a minus-3 Thursday night. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

If you were worried about the Bruins defense being a disaster with Dougie Hamilton gone and Zdeno Chara banged up, your worst fears were realized in Thursday night’s season-opening loss against the Jets.

The game actually didn’t start off too badly at all. The Bruins were on the attack most of the first period and the defense didn’t really give the Jets any good looks on the few occasions they did get into the Bruins’ zone.

But then the second period happened. The Jets’ first goal came off a combination of all three Bruins forwards getting caught up ice and Joe Morrow not putting enough on his pass into the neutral zone, leading to an easy interception for Dustin Byfuglien and an odd-man rush the other way.

The second came off a brutal turnover by Matt Irwin behind the Bruins’ net, as Andrew Ladd picked his pocket clean before setting up former Bruin Blake Wheeler right in front. The third resulted from another tough sequence for Irwin and defensive partner Zach Trotman. Trotman couldn’t get his stick on a pass through the slot that went right by him, and then Irwin compounded that by completely losing track of his man and allowing Drew Stafford an easy finish on the doorstep.

Things didn’t get any better in the third. After the Bruins cut the deficit to 3-2, Irwin got caught pinching in the offensive zone (as you’ve probably gathered by now, the UMass product did not have a good night) and David Krejci, who was the closest to being able to cover for Irwin, could not keep up with Chris Thorburn on the rush the other way. The Jets then made it 5-2 when Torey Krug couldn’t clear out 5-foot-9 Nicolas Petan and watched a centering pass bounce off Petan’s skate and in.

“I think the examples are pretty clear of where we made those mistakes and where it cost us goals,” Claude Julien said after the game. “It was clear right from the get-go there, so it’s going to be easy to show those kinds of things. We’re early in the season, you’ve got to show those kinds of things. We’ve got to work and rectify those things as soon as possible.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Joe Morrow, Matt Irwin, Zach Trotman, Zdeno Chara
Bruins sign defenseman Matt Irwin to 1-year deal 07.10.15 at 10:54 am ET
By   |  Comments Off on Bruins sign defenseman Matt Irwin to 1-year deal

The Bruins have signed defenseman Matt Irwin to a one-year deal worth $800,000, the team announced Friday.

The 27-year-old Irwin has spent the last three seasons with the San Jose Sharks and registered eight goals and 11 assists in 53 games last year while playing 17:01 per game. Irwin, who is listed at 6-foot-2 and 210 pounds, played two years of college hockey at UMass from 2008-2010.

The strength of Irwin’s game is his offense, as he likes to jump into the rush and has a good shot. He has generally been pretty sheltered in terms of usage and has seen his CorsiRel go from a stellar plus-3.9 in 2012-13 to a not-so-stellar minus-4.0 in 2013-14 before settling in the middle at an even 0.0 in 2014-15, according to war-on-ice.com.

Irwin adds to a logjam of Bruins defensemen who would ideally be suited for a third-pairing role, but he probably won’t be the top-four solution they need unless the defensive side of his game really improves.

Still, he should be able to push for playing time, especially if the Bruins want someone who can bring more puck-moving and offensive skill than Adam McQuaid or Kevan Miller.

Bruins prospect Matt Grzelcyk announces he will return to BU for senior year 04.17.15 at 10:14 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Bruins prospect Matt Grzelcyk announces he will return to BU for senior year

Bruins prospect Matt Grzelcyk announced that he will return to Boston University for his senior season at the team’s awards banquet Friday night. He had been mulling the possibility of signing with the Bruins and forgoing his senior year.

Grzelcyk, a 5-foot-10 defenseman from Charlestown whom the B’s drafted in the third round in 2012, served as BU’s captain this past season and will reprise the role next year. He finished fourth nationally among defensemen with 38 points (10 goals, 28 asssists) in 41 games and was named a First Team All-American.

As the leader of a defense corps that featured four freshmen, Grzelcyk helped guide BU to a Hockey East regular-season title, a Hockey East tournament title and a Frozen Four appearance. The Terriers’ season ended with a 4-3 loss to Providence in last Saturday’s national championship game.

Another interesting development at BU’s awards banquet was that Hobey Baker Award winner and future No. 2 overall pick Jack Eichel was named an alternate captain for next season.

Eichel is probably still more likely to sign with the team that drafts him than return to BU for his sophomore year, but him getting an ‘A’ is still notable. Eichel has said that he hasn’t decided anything as far as going pro vs. returning to BU, and people close to BU have suggested that there is more of a chance of him returning than people might assume.

Bruins prospect Zane McIntyre wins Mike Richter Award, will take time to make decision on turning pro 04.10.15 at 2:49 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Bruins prospect Zane McIntyre wins Mike Richter Award, will take time to make decision on turning pro

Bruins prospect Zane McIntyre won the second annual Mike Richter Award, given to the top goalie in college hockey. McIntyre led the country with 29 wins for North Dakota this season and finished tied for 11th with a .929 save percentage.

McIntyre and North Dakota’s season came to an end Thursday night with a 5-3 loss to Boston University in the national semifinals at TD Garden. McIntyre had an off night by his standards, as it was just the fourth time all season he’s allowed more than three goals in a game. Two of BU’s goals came from above the faceoff circles without much traffic and another came on a bad-angle shot, although there was a lot of traffic in front for that one.

McIntyre, a junior whom the Bruins drafted in the sixth round in 2010, now has to decide whether he wants to return to North Dakota for his senior season or turn pro. And if he turns pro, he needs to decide if he wants to sign with the Bruins or become a free agent. McIntyre could become a free agent if the Bruins don’t sign him within 30 days of him leaving school.

McIntyre said Friday that he has not made any decisions yet and that he will take some time to talk with his coaches, family and the Bruins before doing so.

“There definitely hasn’t been any decision yet,” McIntyre said. “Everything’s really new and really fresh with what happened last night. I don’t think it would be fair to myself, my family, my current teammates to really just make a decision that quickly.

“I think it’s definitely going to take some time to see what happens and really get some perspectives from everybody in my life, whether it’s coaches, fellow teammates and especially my family. I think I’ll know when the time’s right to make a decision one way or another.”

McIntyre is also a finalist for the Hobey Baker Award along with BU’s Jack Eichel and Harvard’s Jimmy Vesey. That award, given to the best player in college hockey, will be presented Friday night.

Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule

Latest from Bleacher Report

Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines