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Bruins show they have learned how to handle Canadiens’ speed 03.25.14 at 12:12 am ET
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The loss is disappointing. The 12-game winning streak coming to an end is disappointing. Not burying more chances is disappointing. And getting goaded into a couple retaliatory penalties is disappointing.

But despite all that, the Bruins actually have a lot to feel good about after Monday night’€™s 2-1 shootout loss. Most importantly, it has become pretty clear that the Bruins have learned how to neutralize Montreal’€™s speed.

After a 4-1 loss to Montreal back on Jan. 30 — Boston’€™s fifth straight against its archrival — the Canadiens’€™ speed was all the rage. Sure, the Bruins had the deeper, better team. But when they went head-to-head, the Habs could expose the B’€™s. They could get through the neutral zone quickly. They could attack in transition. They could force uncharacteristic turnovers and take advantage, even when Boston was otherwise controlling play.

The last two times the Bruins and Canadiens have met, none of that has happened. The Bruins have continued to control play — something they showed signs of even in the two losses to Montreal earlier this season — but they’€™ve cut down on the Habs’€™ quick-strike ability.

The B’€™s obviously haven’€™t been perfect, but the mistakes have clearly gone way down. They’€™re not panicking under the pressure created by Montreal’€™s closing speed, and they’€™re not getting caught up ice and handing the Canadiens odd-man rushes.

“I think we’€™re playing a little bit more to our system,” Patrice Bergeron said. “I think earlier, we were getting away from our game. It’€™s obviously something that they want. They want that speedy game, that game where we don’€™t take care of the puck. They rely on turnovers, and I thought we’€™ve done a better job of that.”

The result of all that is a measly two goals against in their last two meetings. The Bruins’€™ dominance in their last matchup (a 4-1 win at the Bell Centre) is easy enough to see on the scoreboard. The dominance Monday night isn’€™t as evident. They didn’€™t win, and much of the game was overshadowed by fights, shoving matches, retaliation and all sorts of extracurricular activity.

But let’€™s take that out of the equation for a minute. At even strength — and believe it or not, there were actually 43 minutes played at even strength Monday night — the Bruins outshot the Canadiens 22-9 and out-attempted them 44-23. That’€™s dominance. And it’€™s not a one-game aberration either. The Bruins’€™ Corsi has been over 50 percent in three of their four meeting with Montreal this season, and it’€™s been over 60 percent twice.

“Their speed didn’€™t really get us today,” Johnny Boychuk said. “There have been times when they’€™ve caught us off guard and there’€™s a guy going for a breakaway, but it didn’€™t happen tonight. We just did a good job handling their guys and their speed. We limited their chances, that’€™s for sure.”

The question was never whether or not the Bruins could possess the puck and control play against Montreal. It was whether or not they could slow down the Habs in transition. The last two times they’€™ve played, the B’€™s have done that, and that’€™s a very encouraging sign for Boston should these two meet in the playoffs.

Rich Peverley to undergo heart procedure, will not play again this season 03.12.14 at 4:17 pm ET
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In a press conference Wednesday afternoon, the Stars and team-affiliated doctors announced that Rich Peverley‘s season is over. Peverley, who collapsed on the bench Monday night and needed to be defibrillated, will now undergo a heart procedure that was originally scheduled for after the season.

Doctors said the procedure — called atrial fibrillation ablation — is usually effective in permanently preventing incidents like the one Peverley suffered on Monday. They said it is too early to know if he will be able to play hockey again, though.

Peverley gave a brief statement at the press conference, thanking doctors for saving his life and saying he will be “forever grateful.” Doctors said it took only 14 seconds to get Peverley off the bench and down the tunnel to begin treatment.

Doctors said Peverley may have played with an irregular heartbeat during the Bruins’ run to the Stanley Cup finals last season, but that it wasn’t identified until a physical in training camp before this season.

Peverley missed the entire preseason and the start of the regular season after undergoing a procedure that was expected to get him through the season. He then missed a game last Tuesday after the issue flared up again, leading doctors to increase his medicine dosage.

Former Bruin Rich Peverley collapses during Stars game, is conscious 03.10.14 at 9:34 pm ET
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Former Bruin Rich Peverley collapsed on the bench during the first period of Monday night’s Stars-Blue Jackets game and was rushed to the hospital. The Stars tweeted that Peverley is conscious, though. The game was postponed following the scary situation.


Peverley missed the start of the season following a procedure to correct an irregular heartbeat, and then missed another game last Tuesday with similar issues. It’s unclear if Monday night’s incident is related to those previous issues.

Deadspin has video of the incident if you want to see how it unfolded.

Update: Stars blog Defending Big D reports that doctors used a defibrillator on Peverley, and that upon regaining consciousness, Peverley said he wanted to go back in the game.

Gregory Campbell, Merlot Line ‘trying to gain that trust from the coaching staff’ 03.06.14 at 11:09 pm ET
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Gregory Campbell is never going to be mistaken for a goal-scorer, but he’s been doing a pretty good impression of one these last four games.

Early in the second period of Thursday’s game against Washington, Campbell planted himself in front of the net during an offensive-zone possession and then redirected a Patrice Bergeron one-timer through his own legs and over Braden Holtby‘s right arm for his fourth goal in as many games.

While the goal didn’t come with the entire Merlot Line on the ice (Bergeron had replaced Shawn Thornton to provide a faceoff security blanket on a defensive-zone draw), it did continue a recent upward swing in the fourth line’s effectiveness.

“We’re doing a lot better,” Campbell said of his line. “We’re working hard and trying to work off of each other. Our other three lines have been playing really well and contributing on a nightly basis, and everybody knows that all four lines producing in the playoffs is a good recipe.”

The Bruins don’t need Campbell, Thornton and Daniel Paille to score every game, but they’re hoping this recent stretch of offensive success will build some momentum so the Bruins don’t suffer any letdowns in their play when the fourth line is on the ice.

The trio has never really been a great possession line, but when they’re at the best, they’ve been able to dump the puck in, create some chaos on the forecheck, and turn that into an offensive chance or two before they go for a change.

That’s something they had been missing in late January and early February, when they went seven straight games with a Corsi percentage under .500 and scored just two goals during that span.

“They’re just more in sync,” Claude Julien said. “I think when you watch them play now… they were a little erratic there at some points, and because of that, they were spending more time in their own end than they did at the other end of the ice.”

With six back-to-backs in March and two more in April, the Bruins knew they were going to need the fourth line to take on more ice time to prevent the other three lines from getting overworked. Campbell and his longtime wingers wanted to make sure they made the most of those minutes and showed Julien they were up to the challenge.

“The coaching staff and Claude are always fair to us,” Campbell said. “The harder we work, we tend to get rewarded more with ice time, and the more responsible we are, the more confidence he has in us as a line. He has no problem playing us if we’re playing well and he can trust us.

“So we’re trying to gain that trust from the coaching staff, and we’ve done it time and time again. I think that we’re getting back to that point where we can be out there and contribute.”

Bruins reportedly claim defenseman Corey Potter off waivers from Oilers 03.05.14 at 12:19 pm ET
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The Bruins have claimed defenseman Corey Potter off waivers from the Oilers, according to multiple reports. Potter is a 30-year-old, 6-foot-3 right shot who could serve as a depth option on the blue line. He is an unrestricted free agent after this season.

Potter had appeared in 16 games for the Oilers this season, picking up five assists and 21 penalty minutes while playing 14:47 per game. He was used in extremely low-leverage situations, ranking last among Edmonton’s nine qualified defensemen in ice time and quality of competition. Even in those sheltered situations, he struggled, posting the worst CorsiRel (shot attempts for/against relative to his teammates) on the team.


Reports: Lightning trade Martin St. Louis to Rangers for Ryan Callahan, picks 03.05.14 at 11:40 am ET
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The Lightning have traded Martin St. Louis to the Rangers in exchange for Ryan Callahan, a 2015 first-round pick and a 2014 second-round pick, according to multiple reports. TSN’s Bob McKenzie was the first to report the deal.

St. Louis ranks eighth in the NHL with 61 points in 62 games this season, while Callahan has 25 points in 45 games. St. Louis has another year left on his deal, but recently requested a trade after a falling-out with general manager Steve Yzerman, believed to be the result of Yzerman leaving St. Louis off his initial Team Canada roster. Callahan is an unrestricted free agent after this season. Interestingly enough, St. Louis and Callahan were both captains of their previous teams.

The 2015 first-round pick that Tampa acquired could prove to be extremely valuable, as that draft class is considered one of the best in years.

The Lightning, who found out Steven Stamkos has been cleared to return earlier on Wednesday, are currently third in the Atlantic Division and fourth in the Eastern Conference. The Rangers are third in the Metropolitan Division and seventh in the conference.

Bruins hope back-to-back games will help them shake off rust 03.01.14 at 5:06 pm ET
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The good thing about back-to-backs is that if you stink in the first game, you get a chance to make amends the very next night.

That’s the mindset the Bruins will have as they head to New York to take on the Rangers Sunday night. They weren’t entirely terrible on Saturday — in fact, they actually out-attempted Washington 67-44 — but they had some horrific defensive breakdowns that directly led to four goals and a loss.

The Bruins suffered similar breakdowns in Wednesday’s overtime loss against Buffalo, another game they dominated possession-wise. They had two days of practice to try to correct those mistakes, but obviously that didn’t do a whole lot of good.

Perhaps the solution is to just keep playing games. Claude Julien thinks that could be the case.

“I think we’re OK,” Julien said. “I think we’ve played together and played the way we should for long enough that, basically, they need to see it more than they need to practice it. Tomorrow’s going to be a good day for us to look at those things and get ready for tomorrow night. It’s probably not a bad thing that we have back-to-back games. We can put this one aside quickly and work on the next one.”

It makes sense. The Bruins had been playing great prior to the Olympic break. Then everything just stopped for two weeks. It shouldn’t be a total shock that they’ve struggled to pick up where they left off.

The Bruins have still been good enough to control play for long stretches of both their post-Olympic games, but the rust has shown with some miscommunications (like the one Matt Bartkowski and Johnny Boychuk had on Washington’s third goal Saturday), missed assignments (like Alex Ovechkin being left open on his two power-play goals) and bad reads (which Patrice Bergeron and Torey Krug were both guilty of on the Capitals’ fourth goal).

Some fans and reporters will use this to fuel the Bruins-need-an-impact-defenseman talk. While getting one would certainly help, let’s not lose sight of the fact that the mistakes made in these last two games are the exception, not the rule. The Bruins are second in the NHL in scoring defense for a reason. They’re a good defensive team. They just have some kinks to work out of their game.

They’ll get another crack at doing that a little more than 24 hours after Saturday’s loss, and that could be just what they need. A lot of teams struggle in the second game of a back-to-back, but the Bruins have actually excelled in those situations this season, posting a 7-2-0 record in second games. That could be a good sign moving forward, as the B’s have eight back-to-backs left this season.

“I think it’s good to kind of turn the page right away and get back at it tomorrow,” Gregory Campbell said. “There’s some things that we need to do better, some things we addressed before the game, and it didn’t really take into account during the game. So I think from our standpoint, it’s good that we’re playing tomorrow night.”

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