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Shawn Thornton on D&C: ‘There’s no panic’ in Bruins, even when trailing Canadiens late 05.05.14 at 10:14 am ET
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Bruins forward Shawn Thornton joined Dennis & Callahan on Monday to discuss Boston’s comeback win over the Canadiens in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

The Bruins are 1-1 in the second round of the playoffs after they scored four goals in the final nine-plus minutes in Saturday’s game to grab a 5-3 victory.

“We started talking about it yesterday at the rink,” Thornton said. “I don’t think anybody really realized that we did all that in nine minutes left. We weren’t looking at the clock. We were just looking at the next shift and the next shift. It was how we’ve been for the past I don’t know how many years, but we’re not like, ‘Oh, no, we’ve got to get …’ There’s no panic. It’s just like, keep going, keep going, keep going. It’s going to work out. And we like to make it interesting, I’ll say that.”

Through the first 40 minutes of Saturday’s game, Montreal goaltender Carey Price stopped 26 shots and had a big save on a shot by Milan Lucic in the second period. Price said after the game that the Bruins “got pretty lucky” in the third period.

“He’s obviously got a lot of confidence right now,” Thornton said. “We’re going to have to prove him wrong.

“You’ve got to get some bounces to go your way when you’re down that many goals within nine minutes, to score that many goals with nine minutes left. You have to get the fortunate bounces that we maybe weren’t getting earlier. I don’t know if that’s luck. I think that’s just hockey. I think that happens a lot on both sides.

“I think we’re very fortunate that we got a few by him at the end. [Patrice Bergeron's] line played unbelievable — they capitalized on their chances, they were creating a lot of havoc and the pucks were where they needed to put them. … The stop on Lucic in the second period — I still don’t know how [Price] didn’t yank everything out of his body stretching to make that save. I’m glad we finally got something through, because we needed that win in a big way.”

The Bruins will fly out to Montreal on Monday before taking on the Canadiens at the Bell Centre in Game 3 Tuesday night.

“The crowd definitely — I’ve seen the crowd call penalties up there, as crazy as that sounds,” Thornton said. “The energy in the building — I think we obviously fed off it last game in our building, and they’ll probably try to do the same in theirs.”

For more Bruins news, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Carey Price, Shawn Thornton,
Andrej Meszaros glad to be back in Bruins lineup 05.04.14 at 2:06 pm ET
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When Matt Bartkowski got healthy and was given his usual spot on the Bruins’ second pairing back midway through the first round against the Red Wings, Andrej Meszaros had to know that he wasn’t going to sit for long. It’s the playoffs; players get hurt.

Yet when Meszaros made his return to Boston’s lineup in Saturday’s Game 2 against the Canadiens, it wasn’t because of injuries, but because Bartkowski was having a tough go of it. Bartkowski, who beat out Meszaros for the job as Johnny Boychuk‘s partner down the stretch, returned from the flu for Game 3 against the Red Wings, but struggled in Games 4 and 5 against Detroit.

When Bartkowski had another tough performance in Game 1 against the Canadiens — most notably taking the penalty that led to P.K. Subban‘s double-overtime-winner, Claude Julien showed just how short a leash he’s keeping his players on and put Meszaros back in the lineup for Game 2.

“It’€™s what we decided to do; it’€™s as simple as that,” Julien said Sunday. “I think we felt we needed a change and we made that.”

Meszaros had an assist and took a roughing penalty Saturday. His penalty for getting into it with Tomas Plekanec — which should have been matching — led to a Thomas Vanek power play goal.

By the looks of it, Meszaros will remain in the lineup going forward, as Bartkowski skated with the injured players and scratches Sunday.

“I had to prepare myself because you never know what’€™s going to happen, if there’€™s going to be injuries or whatever,” Meszaros said Sunday. “But obviously being out of the lineup it’€™s tough for anybody, not just for me. But I’€™m glad I got the opportunity to go out there and play. It was a fun game.”

There is one interesting wrinkle to Meszaros’ situation: The pick that was traded to the Flyers at the trade deadline was conditional, and it’s in jeopardy of vesting. As is, Boston has sent a third-round pick in the upcoming draft to Philadelphia for Meszaros, but if the B’s advance to the Eastern Conference finals and Meszaros plays in two thirds of Boston’s postseason games, the Flyers would get Boston’s second-round pick instead.

Meszaros has now played in three of the Bruins’ seven playoff games, but if the B’s beat the Canadiens, he’ll have played in at least 6 of Boston’s 10. In other words, if the Bruins beat the Canadiens and Meszaros stays in the lineup for the rest (or even most) of Boston’s playoff run, the Flyers will get that pick. Philly also gets that pick if the Bruins re-sign Meszaros before the draft. Should the B’s sign him after the draft, the Flyers get a fourth-rounder 2015 in addition to this year’s third.

Read More: Andrej Meszaros,
No practice for Bruins; Adam McQuaid has ankle surgery 05.04.14 at 1:40 pm ET
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Adam McQuaid, who has been out since Jan. 19 with a quad strain, is officially done for the season after getting arthoscopic surgery on his right ankle. McQuaid played 30 games this season, the last of which was Jan. 19 in Chicago before missing the rest of the season with a quad strain.

McQuaid was last seen skating on April 19. According to an industry source, the decision was made for McQuaid to have surgery on the ankle — an issue that he’d already been dealing with — once it became clear that he wouldn’t be able to play this season due to the quad injury. At that point, it made sense to take care of the ankle immediately.

It was obviously a very trying year for McQuaid, who initially hurt himself on Nov. 9 against the Maple Leafs and made multiple comeback attempts that didn’t take. He returned for three games in November before re-aggravating his quad injury and then came back in December to play 11 games before getting injured again. The team shut him down for over a month in March, but he never returned to game action.

“Every time I’ve come back, I’ve hoped that that was going to be the end of it, but it’s hockey and things happens,” McQuaid said in February. “So it goes in life.”

It could be tougher for McQuaid going forward, as Kevan Miller may have claimed the third-pairing right spot — McQuaid’s usual role — for good. McQuaid has one more year on his current contract after this season with a $1.56 million cap hit, while Miller is signed up for the next two seasons at $800,000 a year.

———

McQuaid’s teammates stayed off the ice for the most part Sunday as they have a two-day break between Saturday’s Game 2 victory in Boston and Tuesday’s Game 3 in Montreal.

On the ice for the Bruins Sunday morning were Dennis Seidenberg, Corey Potter, Justin Florek and Matt Bartkowski. Florek and Bartkowski were both healthy scratches in Game 2 against the Canadiens.

Potter’s presence on the ice is a good sign, as he suffered a shoulder injury between Games 4 and 5 of the first round against the Red Wings.

As for Chris Kelly, who has yet to skate since suffering a back injury late in the season, Claude Julien gave minimal update on Boston’s third-line left wing. Julien would only say that each day has been better for Kelly.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Chris Kelly, Kevan Miller,
Brad Marchand’s patented pull-up move sparks Bruins comeback in Game 2 win over Canadiens 05.03.14 at 6:26 pm ET
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Every comeback has to start somewhere, and this one started with a move Brad Marchand has perfected. No, it wasn’€™t a shove after the whistle or a stick to someone’s legs behind the play.

It was that move where he pulls up on the rush before hitting a trailer, one that often leads to a quality scoring chance. With his team trailing 3-1 and just over nine minutes remaining Saturday, Marchand used the move to set up the goal that sparked the Bruins’ Game 2 comeback and helped them even up their second-round series against the Canadiens.

As Marchand entered the offensive zone, he had several options. He could have tried to beat Montreal defenseman Alexei Emelin wide, but even though he had a full head of steam, Emelin was staying with him and appeared to be in position to ride him into the corner if he tried that. He could have tried to beat Emelin 1-on-1 with a move to the inside, but that’s a low-percentage play because most NHL defensemen are too good to get beat like that.

Marchand also could have stayed wide and just thrown the puck to the front of the net. That’s never really a bad option, especially when you have one linemate (Reilly Smith) driving hard to the net and another (Patrice Bergeron) following up the play. The potential for a redirect or a rebound makes that a pretty good scoring chance.

A lot of players would take that option, and no one would criticize them for it. But Marchand is able to recognize when he has an even better option than that. Time and time again, we’ve seen him throw on the brakes and hit the guy just crossing the blue line — whether it’s the center as the third man in or a defenseman as the fourth.

This time it was Dougie Hamilton. Marchand stopped on a dime and sent a beautiful backhand pass out to center point. Hamilton took the pass, took a few strides, and fired a quick snap shot from the high slot that beat Carey Price through a screen.

“The main thing is you’ve just got to drive wide with speed, and if you do that then you’re either going to get around their D or he’s going to cut you off,” Marchand said. “Once he cuts you off and you turn up, you’re going to have room. You know our D are really good at following up the play. Dougie has been playing great lately, so it was good to see him score.” Read the rest of this entry »

Carey Price thinks Bruins ‘got pretty lucky’ in their comeback win in Game 2, and Patrice Bergeron agrees (sort of) 05.03.14 at 5:33 pm ET
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Call it sour grapes. Call it the frustration that comes with letting in a highly questionable goal that tied the game. Or just call it Carey Price answering a question the way he saw it.

However you characterize the Canadiens goalie’s response to letting in three goals in a span of 5:32 of the third period Saturday, you can’t help but read the frustration in his words after the Bruins came from behind and beat Montreal, 5-3, to even the best-of-seven second-round series at 1-1.

“Well, they poured it on at the end of the game,” Price said. “They got pretty lucky, I thought. They were playing desperate at the end of the game, and they found a way to put it in the net. We’ve just got to regroup, realize the situation were in, we’€™re in a good spot, and move forward.”

But still, a closer look shows what the Bruins might be trying to do the rest of the series to be successful. For the better part of five periods, the Bruins had point-blank range shots on Price, including several by David Krejci in Game 1, and Milan Lucic and Jarome Iginla in the first 40 minutes Saturday.

But then, with the B’s trailing 3-1 and facing the prospects of heading to Montreal down 0-2, Dougie Hamilton fired a shot from the center point that made its way through two Bruins parked in front of Price. That goal gave the Bruins desperately needed momentum. Just over three minutes later, Patrice Bergeron fired a shot from the sharp angle along the boards that went off defenseman Francis Boullion and past a screened Price to tie the game. Then, with the Canadiens unable to control the puck in front and Price racing around to his right, Reilly Smith fired a puck past P.K. Subban and into an empty net for the go-ahead goal.

Create mayhem in front of Price and live by the adage, “You can’t stop what you can’t see.” That is what got the Bruins back in the game in the third period and turned the game and series around heading to Montreal for Game 3 Tuesday night.

“That’€™s playoff hockey,” Price said. “That’€™s what it’€™s all about. Right now, they’€™re throwing pucks at the net and they’€™re finding a way through. So, we’€™re going to have to do the same on their end. I thought we’ve played well so far. You’ve got to give that team a lot of credit. They didn’t quit, and in that third period they found a way to come back.”

Price thought the Bruins got “pretty lucky.” Bergeron didn’t argue that point.

“I was just trying to find the net,” Bergeron said. “Sometimes, you never know. I can’t say that I meant to do it, but I got lucky and I’ll take the bounce.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Carey Price, Montreal Canadiens, Patrice Bergeron
P.K. Subban apologized to Shawn Thornton for ducking 05.03.14 at 5:18 pm ET
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Bruins forward Shawn Thornton left the game in the third period after hurting his right knee on a collision with P.K. Subban in the neutral zone. Thornton was going for a hit on Subban, who lowered himself as he sent the puck into the Bruins zone. Thornton ended up returning to the game, but he said after the game that he didn’t like the position Subban put him in and that the Canadiens defenseman apologized to him for the play.

“I don’€™t like people ducking. I think [Brad Marchand] got about five games for it once,” Thornton said. “I will say, off the draw he apologized afterwards, so there’€™s that. I think it’€™s a dangerous play, personally. But it’€™s playoffs, it’€™s hockey, I’€™m fine, so we’€™re OK.”

The suspension to which Thornton referred was Marchand’s ban in the 2011-12 season for a low-bridge hit on Sami Salo. Marchand’s offense was far more egregious than Subban’s, and no penalty was called on Saturday’s incident.

“I don’€™t know what happened,” Subban said of the play. “I just tried to shoot the puck around the zone and I sort of lost my footing there. Obviously you don’€™t want to see anybody go off hurt, but he came back. I don’t know if he stayed in the game, but [I was] happy to see that.”

When Thornton got back on the bench, the Bruins were still trailing by a pair of goals in the third period. He delivered them a message on the bench midway through the period: one goal every five minutes.

“I’€™m not psychic. It’€™s a pretty standard statement depending on the time and the score,” Thornton said. “I think I said two goals, but we’€™re a resilient crew here. We have been all year, so I knew the character would be there’€”I was just hoping the pucks would go in.”

Read More: P.K. Subban, Shawn Thornton,
P.K. Subban on racist tweets: ‘Completely unfair’ to point finger at Bruins or their fans 05.03.14 at 4:54 pm ET
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Moments after his team blew a 3-1 third period lead to the Bruins in Game 2 of their series, P.K. Subban stood in the Canadiens dressing room and addressed the racist tweets directed at him after his game-winning goal in double-overtime Thursday night in Game 1.

What he made extremely clear is that he, in no way, holds the Bruins or their fan base accountable for the hate comments in social media. As a matter of fact, he took the occasion to compliment Bruins fans for their passion.

“You know what, this is the first time and probably the last time I’€™ll comment on it,” Subban said. “First things first, the Boston Bruins are an Original Six franchise, they have been around for a very long time, they are respected. It’€™s completely unfair for anybody to point the finger at the organization or the fan base. They have passionate fans here, great fan base and since I’€™ve been in the league it’€™s been awesome. I’€™ve come to Boston many times, my family has come here, and it’€™s been great. What people may say on Twitter or social media is not a reflection by any means of the league or the Boston Bruins. So, whoever that is, they’€™ll get dealt with, but it’€™s completely separate from this league or the Boston Bruins organization.”

Subban said he felt badly that the comments have taken some focus away from two classic games to open what figures to be an other epic playoff meeting between the two longtime rivals.

“I know some of those players personally on that team, like I said, the fan base has been awesome, they are a great bunch of fans,” Subban said. “It’€™s unfortunate when things take away from the great hockey that was played two days ago. It was a fantastic game, great for the league, great for hockey and that’€™s what we are going to talk about. So I’€™m happy now that we can just move on. You know what the funny thing is, is that we get stronger as a league, you see how people come together and it’€™s great. And it’€™s not just about me, the NHL has tons of players from different backgrounds, from different places around the world and that’€™s what makes this league so special and that’€™s what makes sports so special, it brings everybody together. Another great hockey game today, I’€™m sure everybody enjoyed it and I look forward to the rest of the series and everybody else should, too.”

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