Big Bad Blog AT&T
WEEI.com Blog Network
Kerry Fraser on D&C: ‘Nobody came to the aid of Daniel Sedin’ 06.15.11 at 11:04 am ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  6 Comments

Former NHL referee Kerry Fraser joined the Dennis & Callahan show Wednesday morning to offer his thoughts from a referee’€™s viewpoint on the Stanley Cup finals. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

‘€œThis is not a typical series, certainly not a typical Stanley Cup final,” Fraser said. “We’€™ve seen such crazy, bizarre things go on, and the officials have certainly been under a lot of scrutiny. There has been some inconsistencies for sure, from my perspective. They need to make sure they are well prepared and call that first penalty that happens, otherwise they’re going to be batting uphill all night.’€

Fraser was asked about Game 7s and if the referees don’t call as many penalties as in other games.

‘€œIt’€™s got to be imagined,” he said of that perception. “The players will dictate what the officials do and how they respond. That being said, the officials have to respond appropriately. I found in most Game 7s, the players just want to play. All the stuff that happened in the previous six games is over, it’s forgotten, now it’s do or die. … This is the kind of game where one call, one penalty can make a huge difference in the outcome of the game.”

When asked about the Johnny Boychuk hit that knocked out Mason Raymond for the rest of the series, Fraser said he didn’t feel like it was deserving of a suspension. “The Vancouver fans are furious,” Fraser said. “That was a normal, acceptable kind of play. Twenty seconds in, Johnny fork-hooked the legs of Raymond. It should have been a two-minute hooking or interference penalty. That was it. Once he turned him and their momentum carried him into the boards, it was an awkward position, that’s all it was. There was no suspension deserved.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Daniel Sedin, Johnny Boychuk
Game 7 countdown, 10 a.m.: No violence toward Green Men in Game 6 06.15.11 at 10:08 am ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  2 Comments

The Green Men duo ‘€” Force and Sully ‘€” made it through Game 6 at TD Garden without any incident.

“The Bruins were up 4-0 after 10 minutes, they were just so focused on the fact that they were going to go to Game 7, they were kind of leaving us alone,” Force said. “There was no threats of violence, no beer throwing.”

The duo was amused at the fact that every time a Canucks fan exited the building Bruins fans gave them a standing ovation.

“We really thought the Canucks were going to take it home, and when you’re out of the game only 10 minutes in, it’s really deflating to know you’re going to have to sit there and watch these guys get pummeled for another two hours,” Force said.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs,
Game 7 countdown, 9 a.m.: Ticket prices fall as nervous Canucks fans cash in 06.15.11 at 9:04 am ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  Comments Off on Game 7 countdown, 9 a.m.: Ticket prices fall as nervous Canucks fans cash in

According to The Globe and Mail of Toronto, ticket prices on the secondary market for Game 7 have been falling dramatically since the Bruins dispatched the Canucks in Game 6, although the prices remain at record high levels.

Vancouver ticket broker Mario Livich said his business has been swamped by concerned Canucks fans. “These are people who don’t believe the Canucks are going to win the game, and then they’ll feel like dummies for not selling their tickets and making a lot of money,” Livich said. “If people believe, they’ll pay anything. But the way the Canucks bungled into Game 7 has really affected the market.”

On Tuesday, ticket prices ranged from $2,500 to more than $6,000.

British Columbia Premier Christy Clark will attend the game with her son, Hamish, after receiving tickets from the Canucks (and filing a disclosure statement to avoid breaking any rules). Clark predicted a four-game sweep by the Canucks before the series began, and she also predicted a 3-2 victory for Vancouver in Game 6. She did not offer a Game 7 prediction after noting, “I’ve been wrong in every case so far.”

Meanwhile, a man responding to a Craigslist offer of two tickets for $4,00 reportedly was robbed at gunpoint after entering a vehicle to make the exchange.

Read More: Bruins, Canucks, Christy Clark, Stanley Cup Finals
Game 7 countdown, 8 a.m.: Singer Michael Buble postpones Mohegan Sun concert to watch game 06.15.11 at 7:56 am ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  1 Comment

Singer Michael Buble postponed his concert at Connecticut’s Mohegan Sun Casino from Wednesday to Thursday night “to accommodate all ‘die-hard’ hockey fans in the Northeast.” Buble, who moved up Monday’s concert in Providence one hour to allow hockey fans to watch at least some of the Bruins’ Game 6 victory, is a British Columbia native and fan of the Canucks.

Read More: Michael Buble,
Poll: Who will win Bruins-Canucks Game 7? 06.15.11 at 7:36 am ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  3 Comments

What will happen in Wednesday night's Stanley Cup finals Game 7?

  • Bruins win close game in regulation (49%, 221 Votes)
  • Bruins rout Canucks (23%, 103 Votes)
  • I don't know, but if Alex Burrows scores the game-winner, I might smash my TV (10%, 44 Votes)
  • Canucks win close game in regulation (8%, 35 Votes)
  • Bruins win in overtime (7%, 34 Votes)
  • Canucks rout Bruins (2%, 9 Votes)
  • Canucks win in overtime (2%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 454

Loading ... Loading ...
Read More: Bruins, Canucks, Stanley Cup Finals,
Bruins-Canucks Game 7: Seven keys, stats and players to watch 06.15.11 at 4:31 am ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  5 Comments

VANCOUVER ‘€“ The Bruins and Canucks are a matter of hours away from determining who wins the Stanley Cup. Either way, the season will be over after Wednesday’€™s Game 7, but the Bruins just want to end it on the ultimate high note.

Here are seven keys, stats and players to watch.

SEVEN THINGS THE BRUINS NEED TO DO

Get traffic: It was after Game 5 that a frustrated Patrice Bergeron stood in the visitors dressing room and said the Bruins didn’€™t do enough to get traffic in front of the net. Given that they could do it at home, it’€™s clear they’€™re capable. No better time to finally start doing it in Vancouver than Wednesday.

Score early, shake Robert Luongo: Given the way the first three games here have gone, that could have simply read ‘€œscore.’€ Maybe nobody cares what goes through Luongo’€™s head, but as long as pucks go through his crease and into his net, the mental stuff will follow. The Bruins learned in Game 5 that the floodgates open easily if you can get to him in the first period. Yes, there’€™s something to be said for getting the first goal of the game, but it’€™s generally an overrated statistic. Yet when it comes to Luongo, scoring the first, second and maybe even third goal is gigantic.

Win the special teams battle one last time: The Canucks’€™ power play was supposed to be a reason Vancouver would win the series, yet through six games it is 2-for-31. The Bruins, meanwhile, have five tallies on the power play this series. The Canucks can still make a difference they’€™re on the man advantage, but if the B’€™s can weather it one last time, they’€™ll be in good shape. As for their own power play, nothing could be worse than how they looked in going 0-for-4 on the man advantage in Game 5.

Have the first line show up: David Krejci and Milan Lucic may be coming off a strong Game 6 in which they each scored, but the trio of Lucic, Krejci and Rich Peverley is no sure thing, as they were as silent as silent gets in Game 5. They need to prove that Game 6 was a statement they feel they can put an exclamation point on Wednesday.

Get a lead and hold it: Each loss this series has provided at least one lesson. Game 2’€™s lesson was to hold a lead, something the Bruins didn’€™t do particularly well in two of their losses to Tampa Bay in the conference finals. If the B’€™s can secure a lead at any point, they shouldn’€™t sit back and wait for Vancouver to claw their way back in it. The Canucks can easily come back from a one-goal lead, and the Bruins learned that in Game 2.

Keep getting the good stuff from Thomas: Not many Bruins have been excellent in every game this series, but Thomas has. The game-winner in Game 2 was ugly, but Thomas has allowed just eight goals this round. It would be a shame if he turned in another tremendous performance only to see it squandered as they were in Games 1 and 5.

Keep it in perspective: The Bruins haven’€™t won the Stanley Cup since 1972, so after coming this far, how daunting can the fact that they’€™ve dropped a few in this building really be? Considering how close they are to what they want and how close the games in Vancouver have been, they shouldn’€™t have any reason to be intimidated.

SEVEN STATS

– While Nathan Horton had the game-winners in both of the Bruins’€™ Game 7’€™s this postseason, it is Andrew Ference who leads the Bruins in Game 7 points this year with three. Ference had a pair of assists in Game 7 vs. the Canadiens and picked up a secondary helper on Horton’€™s third-period goal against the Lightning.

Adam McQuaid, Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton are the only Bruins whose pointless streaks match or surpass’€™ Ryan Kesler‘€™s five-game slide.

Tim Thomas seems to have wrapped up the Conn Smythe trophy barring a Canucks blowout Wednesday. His stats this postseason (2.06 goals against average, .937 save percentage) fall between those of the last two goalies to win playoff MVP in Jean-Sebastian Giguere (1.62 GAA .945 save percentage) in 2003 and Cam Ward (2.14 GAA, .920 save percentage) in 2006.

– All Thomas needs is one save to have registered the most in a single postseason in league history. He enters Game 7 at 761, tied with Canucks goalie Kirk McLean, who stopped that many in the 1994 postseason. McLean played 24 games, while Wednesday will mark Thomas’€™ 25th game.

Tomas Kaberle leads all Bruins defensemen with 11 points this postseason. All 11 of his points are assists, as Kaberle and McQuaid are the only regular Boston defensemen without a goal this postseason.

– Since 1971, only two teams have won Game 7 of the finals on the road: the ‘€™71 Canadiens in Chicago and the 2009 Penguins in Detroit.

– Either Dennis Seidenberg or Christian Ehrhoff will become the second German player to win the Stanley Cup. Uwe Krupp won the Cup in 1996 with the Avalanche and played eight regular-season (two postseason) games for the Red Wings when they won it in 2002.

SEVEN PLAYERS TO KEEP AN EYE ON

Milan Lucic: The last three games have summarized exactly the way it’€™s been for Lucic when playing in Boston vs. playing in Vancouver. He fired five shots on goal in Game 4 and picked up an assist at the Garden. In Game 5 he was a complete no-show in a zero-shot performance at Rogers Arena before returning to Boston to score in Game 6. Though he scored in Vancouver in Game 2, he’€™ll need a performance in Game 7 far better than his previous ones on the road this series.

Robert Luongo: The Vezina finalist stepped up big time in Game 5 after struggling in Boston. Will it happen again or is Luongo too fragile to shine when it matters most?

Brad Marchand: For how much of a pest he is and how much he gets on the nerves of opponents, it’€™s a wonder Marchand hasn’€™t shined in Vancouver ‘€“ the hockey capital of infuriating players. Marchand, who has scored in every home game this round, failed to get a single shot on goal in Game 5 at Rogers Arena, so he’€™ll need to bring his four-shot, one-goal performance from Game 6 over to Vancouver. The Bruins have not lost this postseason when Marchand has scored, as they are 8-0 in such games, including Marchand’€™s two-goal performance in Game 1 against the Flyers.

Jeff Tambellini: The bottom-six forward will be back in the lineup due to the injury suffered by Mason Raymond in Game 6. In doing so, Tambellini will be playing for the first time in eight days, as he was benched after Game 3 in favor of Tanner Glass.

Tyler Seguin: For starters, it will be interesting to see how much ice time Claude Julien gives the 19-year-old in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals. Goals have been hard to come by at Rogers Arena, so the potential that Seguin offers is enticing. Regardless of how often he sees the ice, there needs to be zero hesitancy from the rookie: no pulling up to avoid getting hit and no slowing down to avoid going in the corners. It may be his first year, but there’€™s a good chance this is the biggest game he will ever play in his life. Seguin has not scored on the road since March 17 in Nashville.

Dennis Seidenberg: The Bruins’€™ leader in time on ice this postseason was limited to 19:27 when he missed essentially half of the third period. He would come back on the ice and take shifts for the remainder of the game, but he may be a guy to add to the list of players playing through pain.

Alexander Edler: Edler got just three third-period shifts, though Vancouver general manager Mike Gillis said Tuesday that he is ‘€œfine’€ and will play in Game 7. If there’€™s anything slowing Edler down Wednesday, that will be big for the Bruins and crushing for a defensively thin squad.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Stanley Cup Finals,
Nathan Horton travels to Vancouver with Bruins, teammates keep him in mind 06.14.11 at 11:28 pm ET
By   |  Filed under General  |  1 Comment

VANCOUVER — It wasn’t immediately clear whether Nathan Horton would be well enough to endure a coast-to-coast flight, but the concussed Bruins forward did indeed make the trip to Vancouver to watch his team play Wednesday’s Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

“He certainly wanted to be here. We wanted him on this trip,” coach Claude Julien said Tuesday. “As you know, when you get this far, you’re a pretty close-knit  group. Our guys wanted everybody here and they’ve got it.”

Horton suffered a severe concussion that ended his season when he was dropped by Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome early in Game 3 of the series. The first-line right wing left the game and arena in a stretcher and was ruled out for the remainder of the playoffs the next day. Rome, meanwhile, was suspended for four games for the hit. Horton was at TD Garden for Game 6, being shown on the Jumbotron with tears in his eyes waving a pair of Bruins flags.

Now, the Bruins have left Horton’s equipment in his locker, a sign that he is still just as big a part of the team as anyone else. Given that he came to the Bruins with a reputation as a player who was indifferent to the game, the former third overall pick certainly made a strong impression on his teammates in his first year in Boston and found an NHL home.

“That’s something the guys wanted to do,” Julien said of the equipment gesture. “They wanted him to be part of our group here. Until, again, the third game of the playoffs, he was a big contributor to our hockey club. If the doctors would let him, he would play [Wednesday] and we all know that that’s the way he feels right now. He would be willing to play through what he’s gone through.

“But we know that’s not the right decision to make. But that’s the way he’s feeling right now. He wants to play so badly, he would be willing to play through that. So when a guy has that approach and has that will to want to do that for his team and teammates, the least you can do is honor him in your own way. Our players chose to honor him by making sure the trainers brought his equipment. Before the game, his sweater is hanging in his stall. He’s part of our team and we want him there to the end.”

One man who will not be at Rogers Arena Wednesday is Marc Savard. Like Horton, Savard is dealing with issues from a concussion, though Savard’s history of concussions likely make traveling more difficult. Savard has been in attendance at for a couple of games in Boston, a significantly shorter trip from Peterborough, Ontario, this postseason.

“Marc is probably the only one right now that’s not here, and his health varies from day to day, week to week,” Julien said. “He’s still in our thoughts and he’s part of our hockey club as well. We’ve got a lot of guys that are part of this and some of them are here and one of them isn’t.”

Horton developed a reputation as a clutch player in his first postseason this year, scoring series-clinching goals in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals and finals. He had eight goals and nine assists for 17 points and a plus-11 in 21 games.

Video courtesy of Bruins.NHL.com.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Marc Savard, Nathan Horton, Stanley Cup Finals
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule

Latest from Bleacher Report

Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines