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Mark Recchi: ‘Nothing better’ than bringing Cup to Bruins fans 06.18.11 at 3:11 pm ET
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Before moving on to the next phase of his career, Mark Recchi took a little time Saturday to savor his last Stanley Cup championship as a player.

He won with the Mario Lemieux Penguins in 1991. He won with Rod Brind’Amour and the Hurricanes in 2006. And now he’s hoisted the Cup with the Bruins.

“They’re all special in different ways,” Recchi said before getting on a duck boat and going for the three-mile joyride of his career. “To go out on top is something very special and you never forget. Regardless of what would’ve happened in Game 7, this was going to be one of the best groups I ever played with anyway. To get that chance to win with them is incredible.

“They were different. Obviously, ’91 was a long time ago. It wasn’t a parade, we were down at a point down in Pittsburgh. We had a parade in Carolina, which was really good, but not like today. This is something really special.”

The outpouring affected each and every Bruins player, coach and executive on the duck boats Saturday. For the 43-year-old Recchi, it was an amazing feeling.

“It’s incredible,” he said. “It’s such a great sports town anyway. With the Red Sox, Celtics and Patriots all winning in the last 10 years and for the Bruins to do it now – and it’s been a long time, 39 years – it’s great to be a championship city again. There’s nothing better.”

Recchi also said he felt overjoyed for Brad Marchand, Tyler Seguin and Patrice Bergeron and the younger players on this Bruins team, a team that could have its best years ahead of it.

“[2006] was the same thing,” Recchi said. “I was able to just watch the guys react, how react to things, how they feel under pressure. That’s the great thing about it. Now these guys start the playoffs, and hopefully, they get back into this position again and they’ll be able to enjoy it that much more.”

But all of the joy aside Saturday, he said he’s have absolutely no thoughts of extending his career one more season with the Bruins.

“No, that’s it,” Recchi said definitively, though he noted he would like to stay in the game in some sort of management role.

Has he officially contacted the Bruins about a front office gig?

“Oh no, I haven’t talked to anybody about that,” Mark Recchi. “We’ve been having too much fun.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Mario Lemieux, Mark Recchi
Marc Savard says short-term memory issues are ‘terrible’ 06.18.11 at 2:44 pm ET
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Bruins center Marc Savard was able to make it to Boston from his Peterborough, Ontario home to celebrate the team’s Stanley Cup victory with his teammates at Saturday’s rolling rally. That’s the good news for Savard, who is still suffering from post-concussion syndrome after being concussed twice over the past two seasons.

Savard, who has six more years on his contract, did not indicate whether he plans to retire or try to make a return next season, saying he did not want to take to become the story on a day in which the city was celebrating the city’s first Cup in 39 years.

“It’€™s really the furthest thing from my mind right now to be honest with you,” the two-time All-Star said Saturday of potentially returning in the fall. “I just want to enjoy it here and let the boys take the spotlight here because they earned it.”

As for his current status, he said he has seen some improvements since his most recent concussion, suffered in January in a game against the Avalanche, but did note that his short-term memory problems have been “terrible.”

“I’€™m feeling better. I mean I still have my days here and there,” Savard said. “But it’€™s been tough, that’€™s for sure, especially watching and stuff like that.”

Savard did not make the trip to Vancouver to watch Game 7 of the finals. Plane rides can be bad for people with concussions, and though Nathan Horton, who also had a concussion, travelled, one would imagine Savard’s symptoms were worse.

“It was a long flight and stuff like that. So I just stayed at home,” Savard said. “It was a weird feeling, I was kind of around for a couple of games at home, I didn’€™t really want to just stick my nose in it, I know the boys earned it. So I didn’€™t want to take any of the spotlight or anything away from anybody that worked so hard.”

General manager Peter Chiarelli said Friday that he will petition to have both Savard and Steven Kampfer’s names on the Stanley Cup. Savard played only 25 games of the required 41 games (or one Stanley Cup finals game), while Kampfer played in 38.

“That’€™s special,” Savard said of potentially being on the Cup. “Like I said, Peter has been fantastic with me ever since I came here in day one. And he was one of the reasons I did come. So I mean, words can’€™t explain it right now. It’€™s been a long road that’€™s for sure.”

Read More: Marc Savard,
Cam Neely: ‘It’s a very sweet day for us’ 06.18.11 at 2:21 pm ET
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The city of Boston has celebrated world championship teams before with a “rolling rally” like it did on Saturday but never did so many fans turn out. When the city rolled out the duck boats for a three-mile rally route from TD Garden to Copley Square, fans as deep as 20 rows lined the streets to celebrate the 2011 Stanley Cup champion Boston Bruins.

“Mayhem, but all good,” Bruins President Cam Neely said in describing the day. “These fans have waited a long, long time for this. They deserve this. Today is their day to really celebrate it, which is really great.”

Boston Police estimated the crowd at over 1,000,000 and city officials said that it eclipsed the 2004 “Rain Rally” on Oct. 30, 2004 when the city and region celebrated the first World Series title in 86 years. Neely’s Bruins became the seventh Boston team to be celebrated and honored with a duck boat rally, joining the 2001, ’03 and ’04 Patriots, the ’04 and ’07 Red Sox and the ’08 Celtics.

“Just how mentally draining it’s been. You live and breathe for every game, especially when you have four elmination games. I’m proud of the guys for what they did.”

“It’s nice that people feel that way. I came here when I was 21 and grew up here and have a huge passion for the Bruins and the players who played before me and the players I played with and the organization in general. And our fan base took me in and showed their passion for the team and the players. So, to finally win it for them has been an incredible experience.”

“It’s really sweet for everyone that’s put some time and effort in. The people in the back office, work extremely hard, don’t get the recognition. Obviously, all the players, coaches, GMs, it’s going to be a very sweet day for us.”

Neely said he and the organization have yet to come down completely from their epic 4-0 win over Vancouver in British Columbia last Wednesday in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

“It’s been fantastic, just the excitement the whole city has,” he said. “It’s kind of sunk in but hasn’t really sunk in yet. It’s been an incredible experience so far. I was driving in [Friday] and all I kept thinking is, ‘We’re Stanley Cup champs.’ You drive in, you think it’s a normal day but you’re Stanley Cup champs. It keeps running through your head. It’s starting to sink in but it hasn’t fully sunk in.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Cam Neely, NHL
Jeremy Jacobs: ‘Welcome home Lord Stanley’ 06.18.11 at 11:23 am ET
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With the sun breaking through the clouds and basking hundreds of thousands in the afterglow of the city’s first Stanley Cup in 39 years, Boston kicked off another “Rolling Rally” Saturday morning in the parking lot outside TD Garden.

“Lord Stanley, 39 years, welcome home!” exclaimed Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs, one of the first to speak before the duck boats began their three-mile procession from the Garden to Copley Square.

Boston City police termed Saturday’s rally the biggest in the city’s rich sports history, eclipsing even the 2004 Red Sox rally in the rain on Oct. 30, 2004, with well over a million people lined up between 10-15 deep in many areas along the route.

“We got the Cup! We got the Cup!” added Patrice Bergeron, whose two goals in Game 7 led the Bruins to a Cup-clinching 4-0 win in Vancouver on Wednesday night. Since then, the organization and city has been looking forward to celebrating the organization’s sixth Stanley Cup with hockey-loving city and region.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Jeremy Jacobs, Patrice Bergeron
Peter Chiarelli happy he didn’t trade Tim Thomas 06.17.11 at 1:19 pm ET
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Bruins goaltender Tim Thomas was a popular guy last offseason, as he was brought up in trade rumors, some of which were falsely reported. Though the goalie was never going to Philadelphia in exchange for Simon Gagne, Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said Friday at TD Garden that he did have talks with other teams about Thomas, who was coming off hip surgery, had lost his starting job to Tuukka Rask and at the time had three years of a $5 million annual cap hit left on his deal.

“At the time there was kind of a mutually agreement between myself and Tim and Bill Zito, Tim’€™s agent, just to explore it and on the premise that Tim does not want to leave Boston,” Chiarelli said of trading Thomas. “And that’€™s really where it ended. It’€™s really where it ended. And there was some calls in that and they kept him in the loop at all times and he kept stressing he didn’€™t want to leave. I said ‘I know, let’€™s just look at this very briefly.’ And I know there are a lot of stories that flowed from it, but I can’€™t stress enough the fact that Tim never wanted to leave.

“I wouldn’€™t be doing my job if I at least didn’€™t look at some things, and I did. You go through those things, on a number of fronts on a number of fronts, on a number of players. You just field stuff, you look at them, you talk to other teams. And at the end of the day you make the decision yay or nay. And here it was nay. And it was an easy nay.”

Thomas ended up reclaiming the starting job, turning in a shutout in his first start of the season Oct. 10 in Prague against the Coyotes. He ended up allowing just three goals in six starts in October, and even after leveling out was still dominant throughout a season that will undoubtedly earn him his second Vezina trophy in Vegas next week. His .938 save percentage is the best for a goalie in a single season since the stat has been recorded.

Thomas was also named the Conn Smythe trophy winner after the Stanley Cup finals concluded. The award is given to the player most valuable to his team during the playoffs, and Thomas clearly proved that by allowing just eight goals in the seven-game series vs. the Canucks.

Thomas, 37, has two years with a $5 million cap hit left on his contract.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Peter Chiarelli, Stanley Cup Finals, Tim Thomas
Marc Savard to attend parade, Peter Chiarelli hopes to get Savard and Steven Kampfer on Stanley Cup 06.17.11 at 12:16 pm ET
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Bruins center Marc Savard, who suffered his second concussion in as many years this season and is dealing with post-concussion syndrome, will be at Saturday’s rolling rally in celebration of the team’s Stanley Cup victory, according to general manager Peter Chiarelli.

Given that Savard played in only 25 games before a clean hit from former teammate Matt Hunwick ended his season, the two-time All-Star does not qualify to have his name on the Stanley Cup. A player must play in either at least 41 regular-season games or one Stanley Cup finals game to have his name engraved on the trophy. There is a petitioning process, however, and Chiarelli plans on petitioning to get Savard and defenseman Steven Kampfer, who just missed the cutoff by playing in 38 regular-season games, on the Cup.

“I don’€™t know what the process is,” Chiarelli admitted. “I’€™ve given it a little bit of thought. Certainly those two deserve to be on it, so we’€™ll see what we can do to get them on it and go from there.”

Peter Chiarelli says Nathan Horton was playing with separated shoulder 06.17.11 at 12:00 pm ET
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Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said Friday at TD Garden that even before being severely concussed on a headshot from Vancouver’s Aaron Rome in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals, first-line winger Nathan Horton was playing hurt for the Bruins. Horton, who had three game-winning goals in the postseason, two of which clinched series, had been playing with a separated shoulder, according to the GM.

“Well I know Nathan, before he was hurt with his concussion was actually hurt. He had a serious separated shoulder,” Chiarelli said, adding that Horton was “hurt significantly.”

Horton had eight goals and nine assists for 17 points in the postseason, his first experience in the playoffs.

Chiarelli added that he considered the B’s lucky for their lack of injuries suffered by players.

“I think we’€™ll only have one, maybe two, surgeries and we’€™ll get that out there when I get all the information,” Chiarelli said. “But we’€™ve had our guys dinged up, and all teams do, like Vancouver did and Tampa did and Philly did. Montreal did. I think what I can say about the injury front is we were fortunate from that perspective. And again when you look back at past winners, I remember the one year Tampa won I think they had like twenty man-games lost due to injury the whole year in the playoffs. So you have to have an element of luck. And on that front we certainly did.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Nathan Horton, Peter Chiarelli, Stanley Cup Finals
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