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Brad Marchand recalls how Mark Recchi helped him early on as a rookie 04.22.11 at 9:04 pm ET
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MONTREAL — The fact that Mark Recchi is highly respected in the Bruins locker room should come as no surprise to anyone. The 42-year-old has seen everything in his time in the NHL, so when he talks, people listen.

The future Hall-of-Famer did just that after the team’s loss in Game 2 to the Canadiens, telling ESPN recently that he told teammates that they could come back from the 2-0 lead the Habs held after two games. After all, Recchi and the Hurricanes won four in a row to sink the Habs back in 2006 after dropping the first two games of the quarterfinals. The rest, as they say, is history, as the Hurricanes went on to win the Stanley Cup.

Recchi’s words were heard loud and clear by teammates, and they are now halfway to their goal of taking the series after winning Games 3 and 4.

“He said something the other day in the room and everyone kind of perked up a little like, ‘Wow. If Recchi said it, than it’s true,'” linemate Brad Marchand recalled Thursday morning. “It’s great having him here. He’s such a leader. Every time he steps up, he always says the right thing at the right time. It’s great.”

For Marchand, the inspiration from Recchi hasn’t been limited to speeches given to the team. Recchi told the rookie earlier in the season to expect criticism from him.

“One day he was like, ‘I’ll get upset with you. It’s not going to be about you missing a pass, or that you should have given it to me at this [point], but playing your position, little things like that.’ He’s just so good at critiquing you and helping you grow into your game and being in certain positions, stuff like that,” Marchand said. “He was always helping me, telling me to be a certain way or in a certain place. He was really good with that with me throughout the year.”

Marchand’s rookie season was a successful one, as he totaled 21 goals and 20 assists for 41 points. Many of those points came playing on the same line as Recchi and Patrice Bergeron after beginning the season with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton. Though Marchand didn’t always play with Recchi, the help he got from the 42-year-old seemed to come all year after No. 28 expressed an interest in tutoring the youngster.

“He was just like, ‘Listen. I want to help you, and help you out in areas where I think you could maybe do things differently,’ but he never once got upset with me about a pass or anything like that,” Marchand said. “He never got upset with me in general. He would help me out, and any little teaching point that he could help me out with, he really helped me a ton.

“Little things, how he carries himself in the room and off the ice, when to talk to the guys, when to not chirp guys, stuff like that. It’s unbelievable the amount of stuff he knows and he sees throughout the game. He’s like another coach on the ice.”

So, what is a young player thinking when one of the best to play the game begins listing how he could do better? A sensitive player might be disappointed in some, way, shape or form or take feel like they’re doing something wrong. When it comes to Recchi helping Marchand, that isn’t the case.

“You’re very grateful right away, because some guys — a lot of guys — will just sit there and let you make your mistakes,” Marchand said. “He’s that guy that will step up. He likes bringing young guys along, you can tell. The way he talks to everybody, and all the young guys, he helps them out. I was very grateful to have a guy like him teach me things that maybe other guys wouldn’t have. I learned a lot from him this year.”

Recchi’s tutelage of Marchand isn’t the first case in which he’s helped a younger player. Among the youngsters Recchi has helped along the way is Jordan Staal, whom he let live in his guest house back when Staal was a rookie in the 2006-07 season.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Mark Recchi,
Bruins aren’t putting any stock in the home team not winning 04.22.11 at 2:14 pm ET
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So much for home ice advantage. The road team has won all four games in the Bruins’ first-round series against the Canadiens, but the B’s aren’t putting much stock in that as they return home for Game 5 on Saturday night.

“Because the away team scored more goals than the home team in all of those games,” Tim Thomas said, giving the most obvious explanation of why things have played out the way they have. “I don’t put too much thought into that.”

Thomas said that perhaps the home team just needs to play more of a “road game,” which he explained as a smarter, less flashy style of play.

“Play the type of game that you need to play to win,” he said. “Sometimes you’ve got to be safe, sometimes you take the chances. There is a tendency when you’re at home to try to put on a show for the home crowd, and sometimes that works against you over the course of a full 60-minute game.”

Andrew Ference said he doesn’t really believe in home-ice advantage anyway because everyone is just as comfortable on the road as they are at home.

“I don’t put a lot of stock into home-ice advantage, just because I think guys are very professional with the way we travel in the league,” Ference said. “We stay in good hotels and eat well. … We don’t feel like we’re behind the eight ball when we are on the road or anything like that. It’s just another hockey game.”

Claude Julien echoed his defenseman’s sentiments.

“I’m not worried about a team not winning at home,” Julien said. “I think what I’m more concerned about is making sure our team is ready to play tomorrow and hopefully build on that great win yesterday. We just have to keep getting better and not worry about where we’re playing, but how we’re playing.”

Read More: Andrew Ference, Claude Julien, Tim Thomas,
Tim Thomas named Vezina Trophy finalist 04.22.11 at 1:40 pm ET
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In what was pretty much a foregone conclusion, Tim Thomas was named one of three finalists for the Vezina Trophy on Friday. Vancouver’s Roberto Luongo and Nashville’s Pekka Rinne are the other two finalists.

“Very happy to hear that, obviously,” Thomas said. “After last year, I wasn’t quite sure if I’d ever hear that again.”

Thomas, of course, is referring to his up-and-down 2009-10 campaign, in which he finished the season with a 17-18-8 record to go along with a 2.56 goals-against average and .915 save percentage. He ultimately ceded the starting job to Tuukka Rask by the playoffs.

Thomas bounced back in a big way this year, though. He went 35-11-9 and led the NHL in both goals-against average (2.00) and save percentage (.938). That .938 mark was good enough to break Dominik Hasek‘s single-season save percentage record.

“I definitely have more appreciation just for the fact that I have the opportunity to play,” Thomas said. “I waited a long time in my career just for the opportunity to play in any NHL games. I wanted to have the opportunity and wanted to be able to show what I could do. And so after last year, I think it’s made every game a little bit sweeter this year.”

Claude Julien said Thomas not only deserves the nomination, but that he also deserves to win the award.

“I think it’s pretty obvious to me that Tim is very deserving of that nomination,” Julien said. “Obviously I’m a big fan of what he’s done this year, and if you ask me, he certainly deserves it. I’m sure that I would get some arguments from other places, but I’m certainly going to support Tim for the season he’s had. Especially with what he went through last year, to bounce back this year and have that kind of season, he’s certainly very deserving. I wish him all the luck and I hope he wins what he deserves.”

Thomas said that although the nomination is great and he’s certainly happy about it, he’s focused on more pressing matters right now.

“Only if you make it,” Thomas said when asked if the nomination could be a distraction. “It’s weird timing that we happen to be in the middle of a very tough first-round series. … I could talk about it right now, but my focus will immediately go back to the playoff series. I won’t be thinking about the Vezina later today.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Tim Thomas,
Andrew Ference OK with fine, maintains gesture was unintentional 04.22.11 at 1:18 pm ET
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Andrew Ference, who was fined $2,500 by the NHL Friday morning for his gesture after his goal Thursday night, said he was OK with the fine and understood why he was being punished.

“I talked with Mike Murphy of the NHL this morning and explained the same thing I told you guys last night,” Ference said. “He said the same thing, that it looks awful. Obviously with this series, the whole year, how it is between the Habs and the Bruins, a fine is acceptable. I had a good talk with him this morning.”

Ference stood by his claim that the gesture was unintentional. After the game, he said his glove might have gotten caught with the finger up, but that he wasn’t trying to do that.

“I was pumping my fist,” he said on Friday. “I’€™m not giving anybody the bird or anything like that. Like I told [the NHL], it was an unintentional bird. I obviously apologize for it. It wasn’€™t meant to insult anybody, especially a whole row of cameras in the Bell Centre and the fans sitting there.”

Claude Julien stood by his defenseman.

“With Andrew, I think he’s been pretty open with what he thinks of the situation,” Julien said. “His comments were pretty clear, and I’m going to support my player. That’s my job, is to support and believe your player, and that’s what I’m going to do. He’s a big boy, he’s capable of handling himself.”

Read More: Andrew Ference, Claude Julien,
Reports: Ference fined $2,500 for gesture 04.22.11 at 11:04 am ET
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According to multiple reports, Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference has been fined $2,500 by the NHL for making an obscene gesture following his second-period goal in Thursday night’s OT win over the Canadiens.

No penalty was assessed at the time, and Ference denied making the gesture when asked by reporters after the game.

‘€œCoach just showed me it, and it looks awful,’€ Ference said . ‘€œI just saw it and I can assure you that’€™s not part of my repertoire. I don’€™t know if my glove got caught up. I can assure you, that’€™s not part of who I am or what I ever have been. So it looks awful, I admit it, I completely apologize to how it looks. You guys have covered me long enough to know that that’€™s not part of my repertoire.

‘€œI was putting my fist in the air,’€ Ference added. ‘€œI’€™m sorry, it does look awful. I just saw it.’€

Read More: Andrew Ference, Bruins, Canadiens,
Michael Ryder proves Claude Julien right, plays hero in pivotal win over Canadiens 04.22.11 at 12:09 am ET
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MONTREAL — To say that Michael Ryder has been the whipping boy of Bruins fans is an understatement. The $4 million man was far from that for too long after the Bruins’€™ Feb. 9 win over the Canadiens. The free-agent-to-be totaled just two goals over his final 25 games, and was even a healthy scratch three times. 

Since the playoffs began, fans and some media members have lobbied for Ryder to watch them from the press box in order to make room for Tyler Seguin in the lineup. 

On Thursday, Ryder showed that Claude Julien‘€™s decision to stick with him was the right one, ending his lengthy disappearing act with a pair of goals in Game 5 against the Canadiens, including the game-winner in overtime. Julien has coached Ryder everywhere from juniors to the AHL to Montreal to Boston, so it was only fitting that Ryder prove Julien right at Bell Centre.

‘€œI’€™ve been with him for a while,’€ Ryder said of Julien. ‘€œJust for him to give me the ice time and give me the confidence, for me, it just gives me that extra boost to show people that I can still play and still got it.’€

Ryder’€™s big night began when he tied the game at one in the second period, beating Habs netminder Carey Price with a wrist shot after taking a pass from Tomas Kaberle. From there, the weight was finally off the struggling winger’€™s shoulders. 

‘€œYou always get a little frustrated when you don’€™t score and you don’€™t get that many opportunities, but it was definitely a confidence boost,’€ Ryder said. ‘€œHopefully now our line keeps generating stuff, helping to do whatever we can to help this team.’€

He would go on to assist Chris Kelly‘€™s game-tying goal at 13:42 of the third period, which marked the third time in the game that the B’€™s came back to tie it up. They actually never led in the game until Ryder beat Price for the game-winner just 119 seconds into overtime. 

‘€œI’€™m happy for Rydes,’€ Shawn Thornton said of the winger. ‘€œA couple of guys talked about it before, he usually plays pretty well in this building,’€ Shawn Thornton said of the former Canadien. ‘€œI’€™m happy his hard work paid off. Maybe some people in Boston will lay off him now. He’€™s a good guy.’€ 

Read More: Carey Price, Chris Kelly, Claude Julien, Michael Ryder
Andrew Ference denies giving Canadiens fans ‘the finger’ 04.21.11 at 11:02 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Following their Game 4 win over the Canadiens, Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference denied any intention of making an obscene gesture at Habs fans following his second-period goal. Following his tally, which at the time made it a 3-2 game, the veteran was caught on camera giving the middle finger to the crowd.

‘€œCoach just showed me it, and it looks awful,’€ Ference said following the win. ‘€œI just saw it and I can assure you that’€™s not part of my repertoire. I don’€™t know if my glove got caught up. I can assure you, that’€™s not part of who I am or what I ever have been. So it looks awful, I admit it, I completely apologize to how it looks. You guys have covered me long enough to know that that’€™s not part of my repertoire.

‘€œI was putting my fist in the air,’€ he added. ‘€œI’€™m sorry it does look awful. I just saw it.’€

Ference can be fined up to $2,500 for the gesture.

‘€œHonestly, I have no idea,’€ he said of whether he’€™ll pay for it. ‘€œIt looks really bad, but all I can do is tell you the truth and that’€™s the truth.’€

Coach Claude Julien said in his postgame press conference that he had not seen the play.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Claude Julien,

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