Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Aaron Rome’
Nathan Horton done for playoffs with severe concussion 06.07.11 at 10:25 am ET
By   |  19 Comments

The Bruins announced Tuesday morning that first-line right wing Nathan Horton is out for the remainder of the Stanley Cup finals due to a severe concussion. Horton left Monday’s 8-1 Bruins’ Game 3 win in the first period on a stretcher after taking a blindside hit to the head from Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome.

Horton had 17 points (eight goals, nine assists) in 21 postseason games prior to the hit, though he did not have a point in the Stanley Cup finals. He totaled 26 goals and 27 assists for 53 points in the regular season.

With Horton out, the Bruins will likely turn to Michael Ryder on the first line, with Tyler Seguin re-entering the lineup on the team’s third line with Chris Kelly and Rich Peverley.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Aaron Rome, Nathan Horton, Stanley Cup Finals
Steve Levy: ‘Concern’ in Vancouver locker room at 10:21 am ET
By   |  7 Comments

ESPN personality Steve Levy joined the Dennis & Callahan show Tuesday morning after covering Monday night’s Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals for the cable sports network, and the Sportscenter anchor had lots of praise for the goings on at the TD Garden.

“That was unbelievable,” Levy said. “The first two games were also thrilling, but last night had everything. The energy in the building was also terrific. We were also in town for Game 7 of the conference final against Tampa and we thought that was unbelievable. Last night topped that. It was really a special all-around night, except for the hit.”

However, it was mostly a special all-around night for the Bruins and their fans. After the crushing 8-1 loss to their Eastern Conference foes, the Canucks looked certainly uneasy, according to Levy.

“I think there’s some concern, there’s no question,” he said. “I think immediately afterwards there was concern. I think the first two games you saw one-goal games that really could have gone either way, but Vancouver was a whole lot more confident going into last night than they were going into it than coming out of it, no question.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Aaron Rome, Alexandre Burrows, Nathan Horton, Steve Levy
Andy Brickley on D&C: Playoffs ‘time to make strong statements’ about hits to head at 9:25 am ET
By   |  1 Comment

Andy Brickley

NESN Bruins analyst Andy Brickley called in to the Dennis & Callahan show Tuesday morning to talk about the Bruins big 8-1 win over the Canucks in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals the night before. The former Boston forward said he enjoyed what he saw Monday night.

“Thoroughly,” he said. “Absolutely loved just about everything about it except for the [Nathan Horton] hit and the result and maybe a little bit of stooping to the Canucks’ level when they started getting into the taunting with the fingers. Other than those two issues, I really enjoyed the game.”

The biggest reason why Brickley thought that the Bruins were able to take Game 3 was that that they were able to control their emotions and turn that energy into putting pucks in the back of the net, especially following the late losses earlier in the series as well as the early loss of Horton on a hit by Aaron Rome in Game 3.

“I liked the Bruins emotional level coming into the game because that was actually my biggest concern coming off the two dramatic losses in the fashion that they lost in Vancouver. Not a lot of turn-around time to recover emotionally from that overtime loss in Game 2. When you couple that with the late loss in regulation of Game 1, I had some concerns in that area. I think the coaching staff did a real good job, the players themselves, the leadership in the room, got themselves ready to play. Not a great first period but they were ready to play. They were going to bring their skating game and then when one of their top players and a guy that really lean on to make big plays and score big goals goes down early enough in the game, it just took the emotional zeale to another level. But they were able to keep enough disicipline until that game got out of hand.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Aaron Rome, Andy Brickley, Claude Julien, Nathan Horton
Poll: How should NHL punish Canucks’ Aaron Rome? at 8:15 am ET
By   |  15 Comments

What's the appropriate punishment for Aaron Rome after his hit on Nathan Horton Monday night?

  • The remainder of the finals (52%, 294 Votes)
  • More than five games, continuing into next season (26%, 145 Votes)
  • Two games (11%, 60 Votes)
  • Three games (5%, 26 Votes)
  • One game (4%, 22 Votes)
  • No further punishment (2%, 15 Votes)

Total Voters: 562

Loading ... Loading ...
Read More: Aaron Rome, Nathan Horton,
Bruins, Canucks disagree over legality of Aaron Rome’s hit on Nathan Horton at 2:20 am ET
By   |  8 Comments

Almost as big a story as the game itself is Aaron Rome‘s first-period hit on Nathan Horton. After Horton dished a pass off to Milan Lucic, Rome stepped up and landed a late hit to the head that left Horton lying motionless on the ice for several minutes before being carried off on a stretcher.

After the game, players and coaches on both sides agreed that the primary concern was for Horton’s well-being. What they didn’t agree on, however, was how dirty or clean the hit actually was.

“I think what I would  call it is it was a blindside hit that we’ve talked about taking out of the game,” Claude Julien said. “[Horton] made the pass. It was late. [Rome] came from the blindside. Whether it’s through the motion of the hit, it appeared he left his feet a little bit.”

Canucks coach Alain Vigneault disagreed with the assessment that it was the kind of hit the NHL is trying to get rid of.

“That hit was a head-on hit,” Vigneault said. “[Horton] was looking at his pass. It was a little bit late, but I don’t think that’s the type of hit that the league’s trying to take out.”

On replay, it appears that Horton was following the play more than anything — something any player would do while entering the zone on an offensive rush. Vigneault also conveniently ignored the fact that it was a hit to the head, regardless of what Horton was looking at. He wasn’t the only one in the Vancouver dressing room to defend the hit, though.

“I thought it was a very clean hit,” center Manny Malhotra said. “The timing was maybe a fraction off, but all in all, you see those hits on a daily basis.”

Malhotra’s assessment seems even more misguided than his coach’s. If it was “very clean,” Rome wouldn’t have been ejected from the game and he wouldn’t have a disciplinary hearing with the NHL Tuesday morning. And Malhotra must be playing in a different league than everyone else if he sees hits like that every day.

No one on the Bruins called Rome a dirty player, but they did say it was a bad hit.

“I played with him and from what I know of him, he is an honest player,” Shawn Thornton said. “But that doesn’t take away from the fact that it was a lateral hit to the head, and that’s what that rule was set into place for as far as I’m concerned.

“Aaron Rome is a good person. I played with him. We played together in Portland [Maine] and Anaheim. I’m not saying he’s a bad person. I’m just saying those are the hits – as players – we have to take out of the game.”

Whether or not NHL disciplinarian Mike Murphy decides to take Rome out of Game 4 and perhaps beyond remains to be seen. The Bruins didn’t directly say they think Rome should be suspended, but they certainly hinted at it by saying it’s the type of hit the league is trying to eliminate.

“I’ll say what I always say: let the league take care of it,” Julien said. “We’re trying to clean that out. Let’s see where they go with that.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Aaron Rome, Manny Malhotra, Nathan Horton
Brad Marchand said the Bruins were ‘really looking to send a message’ at 12:50 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

In one of the more physical, tense and nasty Stanley Cup final games in recent memory, the Bruins hammered the Canucks, 8-1, Monday night in Game 3 and now trail Vancouver, 2 games-to-1.

The physical play began with a shot to the head of Nathan Horton by Aaron Rome just over five minutes into the contest. Horton left on a stretcher after his neck was immobilized. He reported having feeling in all extremities and was taken to Massachusetts General for observation. The nastiness reached a new level in the third when Shawn Thornton was ejected via a 10-minute misconduct while three more Bruins followed. Rome was ejected along with three other Canucks in the third, as the Bruins poured it on with four goals in the second and four in the third.

“We had a good game but we were really looking to send a message and we wanted to get back in the series,” Brad Marchand said. “They had a pretty commanding lead there. We knew it was going to be a big game tonight and we were just hoping to get back in the series.

“Any playoff series it’s a battle out there. We’re fighting for something we wanted our whole lives. It’s going to be a battle every game. It’s going to look like that. I think it’s just going to get chippier as series goes on.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Aaron Rome, Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand
Nathan Horton leaves in stretcher after blindside hit from Aaron Rome, transported to hospital 06.06.11 at 8:37 pm ET
By   |  8 Comments

Bruins forward Nathan Horton was motionless on the ice roughly five minutes into the first period of Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals Monday after taking a blindside hit to the head from Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome. Horton did not have the puck as Rome dropped the first-line forward at the blueline. The back of Horton’s head was the first thing to hit the ice. After minutes without moving, Horton was taken off the ice in a stretcher. Rome was given a five-minute interference major and game misconduct.

The Bruins announced later in the period that Horton was transported to Mass General Hospital and is moving his extremities.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Aaron Rome, Nathan Horton, Stanley Cup Finals
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines