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Adam McQuaid out 6-8 weeks with broken thumb 11.19.14 at 3:14 pm ET
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Adam McQuaid

Adam McQuaid

Adam McQuaid is out 6-8 weeks with a broken thumb, Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli announced Wednesday. McQuaid suffered the injury in the second period of Tuesday’€™s win over the Blues when he was hit by a Kevin Shattenkirk shot that went off Chris Kelly.

McQuaid joins Zdeno Chara and David Warsofsky as Bruins defensemen who are currently out with injuries. Kevan Miller and Torey Krug also missed time earlier in the season.

Until suffering the injury, McQuaid had played in 20 straight games, the longest stretch of consecutive play he’€™d had the last two seasons. He was limited to two 15-game stretches in a 2013-14 season that was plagued by lower-body injuries.

Prior to Tuesday’s game, McQuaid had averaged 19:55 per night — the highest of his career by nearly four minutes — for the Bruins, often serving as a top-four defenseman who played against the opposition’s better forwards. He had proven himself to be a key piece of a Boston defense that had multiple players go in and out with injuries.

“It’€™€™s great to be back and a part of things here and being with the guys on a daily basis and being in the same routine,” McQuaid told WEEI.com hours before Tuesday’€™s game. “When you’€™€™re not practicing and playing and traveling, you’€™€™re still at the rink and you still see the guys and stuff, but it’€™€™s not quite the same. I’€™€™m really enjoying that part, being back in and being on the ice. Feeling like you’€™€™re a part of wins is nicer than anything.”

This is the last season of McQuaid’s current contract, which has carried a $1.56 million cap hit for each of the last three seasons. He will be an unrestricted free agent at season’s end.

Both Dougie Hamilton and Brad Marchand missed Wednesday’€™s practice as well. Marchand is day-to-day with an undisclosed injury, while Claude Julien told reporters Hamilton is battling the flu.

Hamilton and Dennis Seidenberg are the only members of Boston’s opening night defensemen that have played in every game this season. Both players missed significant time last season — Hamilton missed 18 games between multiple injuries, while Seidenberg missed 48 regular-season games and all of the postseason due to a knee injury.

With McQuaid out, it’s only logical that Kevan Miller will slot back into the lineup in McQuaid’s place. Miller filled in admirably for McQuaid last season, but a dislocated shoulder kept him out for 12 games. He was cleared to play Tuesday but was made a healthy scratch in favor of Matt Bartkowski.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Claude Julien has no update on Adam McQuaid 11.18.14 at 11:48 pm ET
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Claude Julien offered little update on the status of Adam McQuaid following the Bruins’ 2-0 win over the Blues at TD Garden Tuesday. McQuaid left the game in the second period after appearing to take a puck off the right hand/wrist.

“I still have to see what it is, and even if I do go see I don’€™t think I’€™ll get the total answer,” Julien said. “[Members of the medical staff] have to have a look at him first and assess the whole thing.”

McQuaid was playing in his 20th straight game, which was longer than any stretch he’d played last season. He was limited to 30 games by a lower-body injury last season, which was split into two stretches of 15 games.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Adam McQuaid on David Krejci’s in-and-out season: ‘I can definitely relate’ at 12:33 pm ET
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Adam McQuaid hopes David Krejci can return to the Bruins' lineup for good. (Elsa/Getty Images)

Adam McQuaid hopes David Krejci can return to the Bruins’ lineup for good. (Elsa/Getty Images)

David Krejci‘€™s in-and-out-of-the-lineup season hasn’€™t been easy on him or the Bruins, but one teammate doesn’€™t have to look too far back to remember what it’€™s like.

“I can definitely relate,” Adam McQuaid said Tuesday. “It’€™s not easy.”

Krejci has missed a total of nine games this season due to what is believed to be a hip injury-turned-somewhere-else-in-the-lower-body injury. He missed the first three games of the season, returned for nine, sat two, played one and sat the last four. He is nearing his latest return to the lineup and is a possibility to play Tuesday against the Blues.

Though the injuries may not be the same, the frustration of coming back into the lineup only to leave it again is similar. McQuaid suffered a lower-body injury in the 15th game of last season and went on to miss eight games before returning to play 15 more. He came up lame again on Jan. 19 against the Blackhawks and, despite thinking at times that he was nearing a return, did not play another game the rest of the season. The team said they were shutting him down for 2-3 weeks in March due to a quad strain, but the setbacks he had piled up and eventually led to him being shut down for the year and given surgery on another area that needing cleaning up in his ankle.

As McQuaid looks back on his 2013-14 and how he can relate to Krejci, he says the frustrating part is thinking you’€™re ready to go only to find out that you aren’€™t.

“When I went through it, you’€™re trying to gauge where you’€™re at, and you take the proper steps and it’€™s like, ‘€˜OK, I feel good.’€™ Then you try the next thing,” McQuaid said. “Until you try the next thing, you don’€™t know. Sometimes it doesn’€™t go as planned, and then the competitive [aspect] — wanting to push yourself to get back a little bit quicker than you should at times –€” probably doesn’€™t help. It takes a little time.”

This season, McQuaid hasn’€™t had to worry about such uncertainty. He’€™s played in all 19 games for the Bruins thus far ‘€” the longest stretch of consecutive games he’€™s had since the lockout-shortened season ‘€” and has been an important part of a blue line that has lost Johnny Boychuk to a trade and has also lost Zdeno Chara, Kevan Miller and Torey Krug to various injuries at points.

There was a time while McQuaid was out last season that it appeared he would ultimately be expendable on Boston’€™s back end, but it has become the opposite. McQuaid, who has played 19:55 a night this season, has taken on the opposition’€™s top-six forwards regularly after serving as a third-pairing guy for the vast majority of his first four seasons when in the lineup.

“It’€™s great to be back and a part of things here and being with the guys on a daily basis and being in the same routine,” he said. “When you’€™re not practicing and playing and traveling, you’€™re still at the rink and you still see the guys and stuff, but it’€™s not quite the same. I’€™m really enjoying that part, being back in and being on the ice. Feeling like you’€™re a part of wins is nicer than anything.”

McQuaid can only hope that the similarities between his 2013-14 season and Krejci’€™s 2014-15 season end now. Krejci is the Bruins’€™ best offensive player and has been a point-a-game player with 10 points (three goals, seven assists) in his 10 games played this season.

Once Krejci returns, McQuaid has his fingers crossed that everything will be back to normal and that Krejci won’€™t have to experience what McQuaid did a season ago.

“That’€™s the hope,” he said. “I haven’€™t gone into great detail with him about how he’€™s getting along. I mean, we’€™ve talked a little here and there, but again, now is the time if you need the extra time, to take it. At the same time, it’€™s hard. If you’€™re feeling good, you’€™re going to go. If you’€™re feeling good, you’€™re not going to take extra time if you don’€™t feel like you need it. Hopefully when he’€™s back, he’€™s back and back to stay.”

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Adam McQuaid appears to get first turn as potential Johnny Boychuk replacement 10.08.14 at 1:26 pm ET
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Adam McQuaid

Adam McQuaid

Adam McQuaid probably hoped that he would have been a top-4 defenseman by the time he reached his fifth full NHL season. Now, he kind of is. Maybe. For now.

McQuaid, who has played on Boston’€™s bottom pairing throughout his NHL career, figures to open the regular season as Dennis Seidenberg‘€™s defensive partner on Boston’€™s second pairing, by the looks of morning skate. The spot was held by Johnny Boychuk throughout training camp, but Saturday’€™s trade of Boychuk left an opening to be filled by McQuaid, Matt Bartkowski or Kevan Miller.

The guess here is that it will eventually be Miller, but for now, McQuaid, who hasn’€™t played in a regular-season or playoff game since last January, is getting his shot.

“I did feel like [I could be a top-4 player] when I could get some consistency and play a little more,” McQuaid said Wednesday. “I think everyone’€™s always looking to continue to take steps, but it was kind of hard when I was in and out of the lineup so much.

“It is a great opportunity, but I just need to focus on what I do and not look at as any different as a situation. Whoever I’€™m playing against, play hard and be aware of who’€™s out there. That’€™s all you can do.”

McQuaid and Seidenberg have not played much together in the past. Seidenberg has typically played on Boston’€™s second pairing in the regular season before playing on the top pairing in the postseason. McQuaid has remained a third-pairing guy.

“We haven’€™t played with each other a ton, but it’€™s one of those things,” McQuaid. “We’€™ve had the same group here for quite a while, for the most part. Guys have been comfortable playing with one another, but we’€™ve got some shifts together in the preseason. I think he’€™s a pretty easy guy to play with, so I’€™m not too worried about that.”

Look for the Bruins to take their time as they try different players with Seidenberg in order to find a full-time Boychuk replacement. For now, it’€™s McQuaid. The first step to keeping the job will be staying healthy.

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Johnny Boychuk,
Looking at Bruins’ candidates to replace Johnny Boychuk 10.06.14 at 12:18 pm ET
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Kevan Miller may be the eventual replacement for Johnny Boychuk. (Getty Images)

Kevan Miller may be the eventual replacement for Johnny Boychuk. (Getty Images)

The trade of Johnny Boychuk left a tough hole to fill on the right side of the Bruins’ second defensive pairing. Not only was Boychuk a dependable player alongside Zdeno Chara on the top pairing for years, but his work in anchoring the second pairing without Chara in the postseason is what allowed the B’s to team Chara and Dennis Seidenberg with success in the 2011 and 2013 postseasons.

Prior to Saturday’s trade, Boychuk had been skating with Seidenberg on the second pairing. That leaves Seidenberg, who is still shaking the rust off after not playing since last December, without a partner. Assuming that the B’s opt to keep Dougie Hamilton alongside Chara on their top pairing and Torey Krug remains on the third pairing, here are the internal candidates to replace Boychuk:

MATT BARTKOWSKI

Bartkowski is a terrific skater who makes the game exciting for both the right and wrong reasons. He was given a top-4 spot (and then had it taken away, and then had it given back, and then had it taken away, etc.) last season when Seidenberg went down, but that doesn’t mean he’s a shoo-in to return to the second pairing.

Playing Bartkowski on the second pairing would mean that Seidenberg, a left shot who plays the right side when teamed with Chara, would need to move to the right-side to accomodate the left-shooting Bartkowski. Seidenberg and Bartkowski were paired together at points prior to Seidenberg’s injury and again on Saturday night and have not looked good together. By my count, the two played were paired together for eight games last season, with Bartkowski posting an even rating in four of the games, a minus-1 in three of them and a plus-1 in one to combine for a minus-2.

It’s been a weird tenure for Bartkowski in Boston thus far. After being stolen from the Panthers in the hilarious trade that also sent Seidenberg to Boston for Byron Bitz, Craig Weller and a second-round pick, Bartkowski was the final cut on the Stanley Cup-winning 2010-11 team, spent three years in Providence, was(n’t) traded to the Flames for Jarome Iginla, started last season as the seventh defenseman and eventually was Seidenberg’s replacement.

He was sick to begin last postseason and was a scapegoat of sorts as the Bruins were upset by the Canadiens in the second round, though the Bruins taking him in and out of the lineup in that series in favor of Andrej Meszaros probably wasn’t the smartest thing to do for his confidence.

ADAM MCQUAID

McQuaid is a solid third-pairing blueliner who is both responsible in his own and end extremely mean wherever he is on the ice. Yet to assume he can be a top-4 defenseman for a full season and postseason would be irresponsible on the part of the Bruins.

Last season was the most frustrating season of what’€™s been a frustrating NHL career for McQuaid. Since taking Mark Stuart‘€™s job during the 2010-11 season, McQuaid has dealt with injury after injury, with last year being doomed by a quad injury that limited him to just 30 games. When it became clear that he wouldn’€™t be able to return at any point of the postseason, McQuaid got surgery on an ankle that had been bugging him as well.

So, like Seidenberg, McQuaid is trying to regain his form after a long time out of game action (his last regular season game was Jan. 19).

If the Bruins attempt to trade for a top-six forward, McQuaid could still be a candidate to be moved. His $1.56 million cap hit would allow the B’€™s, who figure to have $3.1 million in cap space going into the season, to add a player who makes decent money provided they also move other assets such as draft picks (they have their first-round pick and have four second-rounders in the next two drafts) or prospects. The Bruins’€™ depth on D ‘€” Zach Trotman is in the AHL because of it ‘€” would still make them able to overcome another blueliner, albeit one outside their top-4, being moved.

KEVAN MILLER

If all goes well, this is the guy who eventually replaces Boychuk. Miller is a right shot and the strongest player on the Bruins under 6-foot-9. His skill set is the closest to Boychuk’s of any of the players in this group, but he has a long way to go.

Though he got some minutes with Chara and an opportunity to defend a 6-on-5 against the Penguins, the Bruins generally sheltered Miller as a rookie. As a third-pairing player, the Bruins were careful with his matchups (his -.901 CorsiRel quality of competion was the second-lowest on the team; only his partner in Krug player easier minutes). Krug was also the only player with a higher offensive zone start percentage than Miller.

Claude Julien did not shelter Boychuk last season. The B’s put him out against whatever was leftover for opponents after Chara and Patrice Bergeron‘s line discarded the team’s first line. Boychuk had a .385 CorsiRel quality of competition; only Chara (1.5) and Hamilton (.386) played tougher minutes.

This isn’t to suggest that Miller can’t handle an uptick in competition now or won’t be able to later in the season. It just means that if the Bruins are going to give him the opportunity to replace Boychuk, they can’t hide him like they did last season.

————–

The Bruins mix and match with their pairings throughout the season, and the guess is that they’€™ll probably do that again as they audition Boychuk’€™s replacements. With three legitimate candidates, don’€™t assume that whoever’€™s teamed with Seidenberg Wednesday night will be there all season. The money here is on Miller to be the last man standing.

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Johnny Boychuk, Kevan Miller, Matt Bartkowski
Bruins react to Johnny Boychuk trade and its ‘reality check’ impact going forward 10.05.14 at 10:41 am ET
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With the season opening at home Wednesday against the Flyers, the Bruins don’t have long to be upset about the loss of one of their best teammates.

Still, even coach Claude Julien said after Saturday’s preseason finale that the team will take a little time to get over “the sting” of losing Johnny Boychuk ($3.37 million) to the harsh realities of today’s salary cap NHL.

Torey Krug, just 23, now understands just how important managing the salary cap is for each team after spending most of the summer without a contract because GM Peter Chiarelli couldn’t fit him under the cap. Krug and Reilly Smith had to wait all summer and through most of camp to sign their $1.4 million deals because the team couldn’t sign them.

“[It’s] another lesson in the business for me,” said Krug. “I learned a few things this summer for sure, and it’€™s always going to be part of it forever as long as this game exists and the cap situation exists in this sport, so it’€™s tough to see him go for sure.”

Several defenseman will have to pick up the slack for Boychuk and will have the opportunity to step right in play a bigger role for the 30-year-old who was considered one of the heart-and-soul parts of their Stanley Cup run in 2011 and their finals appearance in 2013.

Adam McQuaid, Matt Bartkowski and Torey Krug are all younger than Boychuk and all will likely get chances to play alongside Dennis Seidenberg on Boston’s No. 2 D-pairing.

“I mean it’€™s been like this the last few years so it doesn’€™t really change anything,” Seidenberg said. “For me, it’€™s just trying to play wherever they put me and trying to do it well.”

“I didn’€™t know that’€”there was some talk about different things and stuff but I was pretty much shocked,” McQuaid said in reacting Saturday. “I don’€™t know, I guess maybe we all just kind of had that hope in the back of our minds that somehow we could all stay. He’€™s a guy that’€™s a huge part of this team and for me a guy that always put a smile on my face every day. Always came to the rink in a good mood and was cracking jokes. I think I’€™ve played seven pro seasons and six have been with Johnny so we’€™ve been through a lot together. He’€™s a guy that’€”I don’€™t think it’€™s really sunk in quite yet’€”but a guy that will be sorely missed.”

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Read More: Adam McQuaid, Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk
At long last, Adam McQuaid returns to game action 09.25.14 at 1:10 am ET
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Adam McQuaid

Adam McQuaid

On Wednesday, Adam McQuaid did something he hadn’t done since January: He played a hockey game.

McQuaid, who has battled injuries throughout his career, was limited to just 30 games last season by a quad injury. When it became clear that he wasn’t going to be better to play at any point in the postseason, the team opted for him to have ankle surgery to correct another area that had been bothering him.

“It’s been a while,” McQuaid said after the game. “It definitely felt good to be out there and to be part of a win again. At times I felt pretty good; other times there was a little bit of rust here and there. I’m just trying to keep building on things and pushing forward.”

McQuaid spent the game on a pairing with Matt Bartkowski. The 27-year-old didn’t fight in the game, but he definitely played the physical style that helped him earn a job in Boston during the team’s Stanley Cup-winning 2010-11 season.

“€œI think he came out and tried to make a statement there that he’s ready to play, and he wants to be here,” Claude Julien said. “I thought he played a real strong game. I gave him high marks for his first game back, and how well he played for his first game back.”

McQuaid said during informal practices earlier this month that he was healthy, but that the biggest adjustment as he returned was going to be the game speed. He said he found that to be the case Wednesday.

“It’s a fast game and if you’re not making decisions quick enough, you’re going to get yourself into trouble,” he said. “I did that a few times, just not making decisions quick enough and moving the puck quick enough.”

Fortunately for McQuaid, any mistakes, including a turnover in front of the Bruins goal that led to a scoring chance on which the Capitals hit the post in the third period, won’t harm the B’s in the preseason. The priority is being healthy and feeling healthy, and McQuaid said the ankle feeling good made a difference.

“Quite a bit,” he said. “It had been a while, so I didn’t realize how much it was bothering me until I was able to get it taken care of and still continuing to see it improve. It definitely feels a lot better.”

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