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Questions remain regarding statuses of Adam McQuaid, Jordan Caron, Benoit Pouliot 10.06.11 at 12:21 pm ET
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Adam McQuaid participated in the Bruins’ morning skate Thursday, taking the ice for the first time since Tuesday. The second-year defenseman had been under the weather, causing him to leave Tuesday’s practice early and miss Wednesday’s altogether.

Claude Julien expressed some optimism after the skate but said the Bruins will make a decision “closer to the game” regarding whether McQuaid will play. If McQuaid can’t go, Matt Bartkowski will play in his place.

Then there’s the question of who will be the healthy scratch among forwards. One would imagine it would be down to third-line wingers Jordan Caron and Benoit Pouliot. Julien did not reveal who would end up watching from the press, saying “we told everybody to be ready for tonight.”

Just a hunch, but the feeling here is that the Bruins pull a bit of a surprise and make Pouliot the scratch.

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Benoit Pouliot, Jordan Caron, Matt Bartkowski
Peter Chiarelli: Bruins approaching other expiring contracts on case-by-case basis 07.14.11 at 6:26 pm ET
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Speaking to the media via conference call, Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid called the decision to take a three-year extension with the B’s Thursday a “no-brainer,” adding, “I really couldn’t picture myself being with any other team or being anything but a Bruin.”

The 24-year-old would have been a restricted free agent after the upcoming season, but this deal will keep him in Boston until 2015.

B’s general manager Peter Chiarelli called McQuaid “a bit of a poster child” for the organization’s development program, as he spent over two seasons in Providence (AHL) before becoming a regular on the B’s blue line during their Stanley Cup championship season. After beginning the season as a healthy scratch, McQuaid saw action due to injuries on the Bruins’ blue line, and his work allowed the B’s to trade Mark Stuart.

“He found his way into this lineup and now is a really solid contributor with his size his toughness his range,” Chiarelli said. “We continue to see him improve, he’s still at a young age and we felt fortunate to be able to lock him up for the foreseeable future.”

Chiarelli noted that while it was good to get a deal done with one of the players entering the last year of their deals, it was not a sign that the B’s will also extend the others (a group that includes David Krejci and Tuukka Rask) before the season begins.

“This was a case of both parties coming together and reaching a real good deal for both parties,” Chiarelli said. “We don’t always go out early and try to sign guys before their deals are done.”

As for the Bruins’ current restricted free agent, Chiarelli offered no update on negotiations with forward Brad Marchand.

“I’m just not going to comment eye time i go to the media,” the GM said. “There’s been discussions, we feel there’s been progress, and that’s where I’ll leave it.”

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Peter Chiarelli,
Bruins give Adam McQuaid three-year extension at 4:58 pm ET
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Adam McQuaid will be in Boston for a while. (AP)

The Bruins announced Thursday that they have re-signed defenseman Adam McQuaid to a three-year extension. McQuaid, 24, was entering the final year of his current deal at a $600,000 salary ($575,000 cap hit) and was set to become a restricted free agent at season’s end.

Despite starting the season as the team’s seventh defenseman, injuries to various Bruins’ defensemen (starting with Johnny Boychuk) allowed McQuaid to work his way into the lineup last season, and his emergence as a safe defenseman with an edge (he finished second on the team with 12 fighting majors) made former first-round pick Mark Stuart expendable, and the B’s shipped Stuart to Atlanta on Feb. 18 in a deal that netted the B’s forward Rich Peverley.

The former second-round pick of the Blue Jackets had four goals and 12 assists for 16 points in his 67 games in the regular season. His plus-30 rating tied for fifth in the NHL.

The B’s also announced that they have signed forward Craig Cunningham to an entry-level deal and given defenseman Zach McKelvie a one-year deal.

Read More: Adam McQuaid,
Video: Adam McQuaid races with royalty 07.06.11 at 11:04 am ET
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While Bruins fans spent the fourth of July eating hamburgers and watching fireworks, B’s defenseman and Prince Edward Island native Adam McQuaid did something that would make more than just mullet aficionados jealous.

With the royal couple in McQuaid’s neck of the woods for a dragon boat race on Dalvay Lake, the Boston blueliner rowed in Kate Middleton‘s boat, which was bested by that of Prince William.

“Even though I lost the race,” McQuaid told The Guardian, “some people might argue I won because I got to be in her boat.”

McQuaid can be seen rowing at 0:27 and 1:10 of the following video, and at 1:33, he even stops to chat with Middleton for a moment. You know the 24-year-old has had a good few months when the only thing he’s lost is a boat race in which he hung out with royalty.

Read More: Adam McQuaid,
Bruins year in review: Top rookie 06.22.11 at 3:09 am ET
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Each day this week, WEEI.com will be taking a look back at the Bruins’ historic 2010-11 Stanley Cup Championship season. So far, we’ve looked at the goal of the year, fight of the year and save of the year. Up today is the Bruins’ rookie of the year, a no-brainer for anyone who followed the championship season.

BRUINS’ TOP ROOKIE

Brad Marchand: 21 G, 20 A, 41 points (regular season); 11 G, 8 A, 19 points (postseason)

“I was impressed with with Marchy from the moment I saw him play. I obviously wasn’t too familiar with him, but having seen him early in training camp… then just build his way up and keep getting better and better, to be honest with you, he was so important to our team. When we were successful, usually Marchy had a big game or played well.

“Playing with Marchy, I enjoyed it a lot… He deserves everything that he’s gotten. He’s worked for it. He had the opportunity. He made the team and he started with us and worked for his ice time. Rightfully so, he’s an important part of this team. To even do what he did in the playoffs, that’s even more important, and says more about him as a player that he can step up in those big games.”

- Gregory Campbell

Brad Marchand was a pleasant surprise and key contributor for the Stanley Cup champs. (AP)

At the beginning of training camp, Tyler Seguin was a household name in Boston. He was perhaps the only Bruins rookie a Bostonian could pick out of the very lineup Seguin assured he had yet to crack. By the end of the Bruins’ Stanley Cup run, people were talking about a few Boston rookies. Seguin’s goals got him the hype and Adam McQuaid‘s mullet got him the cult following and customized t-shirts from Andrew Ference, but no Bruins rookie came close to bringing it the way Brad Marchand did.

When the B’s opened the regular season in Prague, Marchand was a fourth-liner who got around 10 minutes of ice time. When the season ended, he had assisted the game-winning goal in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals and scored two of his own. When all was said and done, Marchand hoisted the Cup having scored 11 goals in the postseason, one behind David Krejci for the postseason lead. He worked his way from being a famed member of the Merlot Line with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton to forming perhaps the team’s most consistent line with Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi, and aside from missing time after being rocked on a beautiful P.K. Subban hip check in December, the 5-foot-9 Marchand looked invincible in the process.

The story of Marchand’s preseason confidence has been well-documented. He told both Peter Chiarelli and Claude Julien that he would score 20 goals (the very number Milan Lucic was optimistically aiming for prior to the season) in his first full season. Chiarelli told him to think about what he was saying. While thinking may never be Marchand’s game, he certainly backed up his words by popping 21 in the regular season.

The downside with Marchand is that with the good, you must take the bad, but depending on how you look at it, the bad isn’t all that bad. He crosses the line often, whether it be with his on-ice actions or words. He was suspended for elbowing R.J. Umberger in the head, but at the end of the day he’s a far cry from a dirty player. He’s one of the Bruins who have been guilty of embellishment, but with Marchand, it’s nowhere near the point of some of the players the B’s saw in Montreal and Vancouver. If anyone wants to deem Marchand’s feistiness a problem, it’s a problem every team in the league would love to have. He’s a special type of player, and the B’s are fortunate to have someone who’s just as good in all three areas of the ice and at killing penalties as he is at getting under opponents’ skin and scoring goals.

Now, after a rookie year in which he became a hero in Boston, Marchand will get paid. A restricted free agent, Marchand couldn’t have asked for a better time to be due a raise, as it should be a big one. He had a salary cap hit of $821,667 last season and could now get upwards of $3 million.

Just a note before we get to the honorable mention section: While McQuaid was a far more mature player in his rookie campaign and provided far more stability than Seguin did (it’s an apples and oranges comparison anyway given the difference in age and position), the argument could be made that the B’s could have won the Stanley Cup without him. In this scribe’s opinion, the Bruins would not have won the Cup were it not for Tyler Seguin. The youngster may have singlehandedly changed the Eastern Conference finals with his performance in the second period of Game 2. As a result, if we had to make this thing a list, Seguin would be the runner up to Marchand.

HONORABLE MENTION: Tyler Seguin, Adam McQuaid

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Brad Marchand, Bruins Year in Review, Gregory Campbell
Patrice Bergeron skates, Adam McQuaid in for Bruins in Game 1 05.14.11 at 11:39 am ET
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Bruins center Patrice Bergeron skated prior to the team’s morning skate Saturday, marking the first time the team’s postseason points leader has taken the ice since suffering a concussion in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference semifinals vs. the Flyers.

“He went out and just had a light skate this morning,” coach Claude Julien said following the team’s morning skate in anticipation of Game 1 of the conference finals vs. the Lightning. “That’s where he’s at now, just a light skate on his own.

“This is something that’s just protocol, that he’s going through the normal stuff,” the coach added. “Today was a light skate on his own, and he just got off the ice when we went on. I don’t think there’s much more that we can give you except that it can go either way. We’re certainly not going to comment on that kind of stuff and just hope that he keeps getting better.”

While Bergeron will miss at least the beginning of the series, Julien said that defenseman Adam McQuaid, who sprained his neck in Game 2 of the conference semifinals in Philadelphia, will be in the lineup for Game 1. McQuaid has three points (all assists) and a plus-4 rating thus far in the playoffs.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Adam McQuaid, Claude Julien, Patrice Bergeron
Claude Julien: Adam McQuaid ‘should be back’ for Game 1 vs. Lightning 05.08.11 at 12:42 pm ET
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Though the Bruins are going to be without center Patrice Bergeron (concussion) for at least the beginning of their Eastern Conference finals matchup with the Lightning, they will likely see one player return from injury. On Sunday, coach Claude Julien echoed general manager Peter Chiarelli‘s comments from a day earlier, telling reporters that the team expects to have Adam McQuaid back in the lineup.

“McQuaid should be back for the start of the series,” Julien told reporters. “Things are looking really good for him.”

McQuaid has been out for the Bruins since leaving Game 2 of the conference semifinals in the first period. The rookie defenseman went head-first into the boards after tripping over his stick on an attempted hit on Flyers forward Mike Richards.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Adam McQuaid, Claude Julien, Peter Chiarelli
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