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Barry Pederson on D&C: Bruins ‘are going to be a good team for a long time’ 06.25.13 at 10:05 am ET
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NESN analyst Barry Pederson, in an interview on the Dennis & Callahan show, identified a number of roster decisions that now face the Bruins following their elimination in a Game 6 loss to the Blackhawks. Still, Pederson suggested that the team’s long-term outlook remains excellent.

With a number of young, still-improving talents like Tyler Seguin, Matt Bartkowski and Dougie Hamilton, Pederson suggested that if Boston can re-sign restricted free agent Tuukka Rask and lock up Patrice Bergeron — who now has one year left in his contract — to an extension, the team has the core to continue to build upon its run of two Stanley Cup Finals and one championship in the last three years.

He emphasized the need for players like Tyler Seguin, Carl Soderberg and Jordan Caron to get stronger to help carry the Bruins through a 2013-14 season that starts in 13 weeks, but overall, Pederson pointed to a sunny outlook for a team that just endured a devastating defeat. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Barry Pederson, Carl Soderberg, Jordan Caron, Matt Bartkowski
Barry Pederson on D&C: Bruins ‘forwards last night were awful with puck management’ 06.20.13 at 11:19 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined the Dennis & Callahan show Thursday morning to talk about the Bruins’ loss in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals.

The Blackhawks offense broke out with a six-goal performance in the game, which was more than the Bruins had allowed in their last four games combined. Pederson said that the Bruins defense struggled because the team’s forwards consistently turned the puck over in the neutral zone.

‘€œYour defense creates your offense and it’€™s your forwards that create your team defense,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œWell the forwards last night were awful with puck management. Turnovers, of course that first goal with [Tyler] Seguin turning it over, but throughout the game Brad Marchand, [Milan] Lucic, they all struggled in areas where they had been very responsible at throughout the playoffs, not allowing outnumbered opportunities. You could also see that as that happened, the turnovers, the transition, Chicago’€™s speed started to jump in, they got some confidence, you saw [Duncan] Keith jumping in, [Brent] Seabrook, [Michal] Rozsival from the backside.’€

Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg were a combined minus-5 on the night, in part due to their inability to keep Chicago forwards away from the front of the net. However, Pederson noted that the B’s forwards did not give them much help in the defensive zone like they had throughout the rest of the playoffs.

‘€œIf you can allow Chara and Seidenberg that even-up opportunity with two-on-two, there is no way [Tuukka Rask is not able to see shots through screens],’€ Pederson said. ‘€œThey were coming at them with three-on-twos and four-on-twos. When you’€™re Chara and Seidenberg, when you see that, normally you are taking away their space by attacking defensively at them. Now you see you have an outnumbered opportunity you’€™ve got to back in. As soon as you back in you give up the blue line, and when you give up the blue line now Chicago can go east-west and not just north-south, which causes problems. As you back off and you have speed, now that allows Chicago to get in front of Tuukka with that front-net presence. You can’€™t get inside position, you can’€™t box out because they’€™re coming at you in waves.

‘€œBut again, that all started with poor puck management in the neutral zone, getting caught defensively, you saw a couple of times when you saw the Bruins defense do what they were supposed to do which was pinch, but there were no forwards behind them backing them up like there was earlier on in the playoffs.’€

However, Pederson pointed out that the silver lining for the Bruins in Game 4 was that they seemed to have figured out Corey Crawford. All five goals went to the glove side, which reminded Pederson of the goalie the Bruins beat last time they were in the Stanley Cup finals.

‘€œTo me, as that game wore on last night, he looked exactly like Roberto Luongo having trouble with that glove,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œYou watch him when he goes into that stance and he is anticipating a shot, instead of having his glove to his side where it should be, he has it up by his head. When he goes down, his glove has to go from by his ear all the way down to by his pads, and right in that area is where they were scoring.

‘€œHe didn’€™t look comfortable. It was almost like he was sitting there ‘€” and I can remember my baseball days playing second base saying, ‘€˜Don’€™t hit the ball to me.’€™ He didn’€™t want that puck on him. It must have been overtime when he was sitting ‘€” that one dump in by [David] Krejci on a snap shot from the blue line gave him all kinds of trouble.’€

To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page. For more Bruins news, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: 2013 Stanley Cup finals, Barry Pederson, Bruins,
Barry Pederson on D&C: Tuukka Rask ‘making it look easy’ 06.18.13 at 11:33 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined the Dennis & Callahan show Tuesday morning to talk about the Bruins’ win in Game 3, the value of team defense and Tuukka Rask‘€™s technically sound play in goal.

Pederson said that the Bruins team defense has played consistently well throughout the playoffs and has been key in winning not only the physical battle but the mental battle.

‘€œWe have seen it whether it was Toronto, the Rangers, Chicago in here or Pittsburgh,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œIt is the fact that they’€™re breaking the will of the opponent. It is so frustrating to go out there and every time you get the puck, [Zdeno] Chara is taking away your space, he is running you through the boards, you think you’€™ve got an open lane and you go to throw it across and all of a sudden [Dennis] Seidenberg is in there with his stick, with his feet. They just don’€™t give you an inch.

‘€œAfter a while it is almost like when you have a horse and you saddle-break him. Once his shoulders roll on you, you know you have the horse’€™s spirit broken and you have a chance of breaking him and getting him saddle-broken. Here’€™s the situation to me where you can see it on the ice where guys are going, ‘€˜OK, we are ready, Chicago. Here comes our energy.’ And it’€™s like, ‘Oh, this just ain’€™t happening.’ They’€™re just frustrating them.’€

That strong team defense is a testament to Claude Julien sticking with his defensive system and having his players buy into it. It is also the result of general manager Peter Chiarelli bringing in players that fit Julien’€™s system well and are willing to play hard on the defensive end every night.

Pederson said that one thing that makes Chiarelli successful is that he is willing to pay players for their contributions on the defensive end — not just the offensive end.

‘€œWhat happens a lot of times is somebody says, ‘€˜OK, we want to play a certain style and we want to reward these guys for being successful, but yet they’€™re playing team defense,’€™ ‘€ Pederson said. ‘€œA lot of times throughout the season when things aren’€™t going well it’€™s like, ‘€˜We just don’€™t have enough offense. We don’€™t have those stars like [Evgeni] Malkin and [Sidney] Crosby who can generate a lot of goals.’€™ But champions, as we know, are known for both sides of the puck. Not only the offense, but it’€™s that great, smothering team defense and the structure and the layers they have defensively.

‘€œIt has been very important also for Peter Chiarelli to reward these players for not only their offense that they show us by being maybe a point-a-game guy, but they are capable on other teams of probably being 80- or 90-point seasons, but they’€™re not. They are giving it up for the team and they are doing it the right way.’€

Tuukka Rask was the beneficiary of the strong team defense in the Bruins’€™ win in Game 3, as he was protected well in his 28-save shutout Monday. However, Pederson said he thinks Rask may not be getting the credit he deserves because he is making it look easier than it is.

‘€œI think one of the things that we are getting ourselves maybe into a bad habit of, is because Tuukka is so sound technically and is so much in control of his emotions right now, he is making it look easy,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œIt’€™s not as easy as it looks. He is just attacking the shooters correctly. When he goes down he is taking up space, his belly is not touching the ice, he is standing up straight with his chest, he is controlling his rebounds.

‘€œA couple of times last night you could see the shifts were getting long and the Bruins needed a whistle. They are coming down the right side and they shoot the puck. He is able to control the rebound and throw it outside of the rink to get yourself a stop or a whistle. He has done a great job. He will be the first to tell you that his team in front of him is playing very well defensively, but I also think his teammates will tell you, ‘€˜Hey, listen, he is playing so well right now and he is so locked in, he is making it look easier than it actually is.’€™ ‘€

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Read More: Barry Pederson, Dennis Seidenberg, Tuukka Rask, Zdeno Chara
Barry Pederson on D&C: Torey Krug’s third-period turnover ‘turning point’ in Game 1 06.13.13 at 10:19 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined Dennis & Callahan on Thursday morning, and following the Bruins’€™ 4-3 triple-overtime loss to the Blackhawks in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals, Pederson pegged defenseman Torey Krug‘€™s third-period turnover that led to Chicago’€™s second goal as a turning point.

Krug’€™s cross-ice pass got intercepted by Andrew Shaw, who assisted Dave Bolland‘€™s goal to cut the Bruins’ lead to 3-2 midway through the third period.

‘€œThe Bruins had complete control of this hockey game early in the third with that 3-1 lead. People I think are talking about the deflection, the bad break they got. But to me the turning point of the hockey game was the giveaway by Krug in his own end,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œThat’€™s one of those plays that’€™s a rookie mistake under pressure. You have the near-side wall is wide open. You either have to carry it up or make that play. As we’€™re taught as youngsters throughout your hockey career, there’€™s one play you don’€™t make in your own end, and that’€™s cross ice. That to me was the one that really changed things.”

It was that turnover ‘€” and the ensuing ‘€œemotional letdown’€ ‘€” that did in the Bruins more than potential complacency up by two goals with about half a period to go, Pederson noted.

Despite the error, Pederson said he doesn’€™t think Claude Julien will bench Krug for Game 2 Saturday, nor does he think the rookie defenseman should be benched. Pederson noted that Krug’€™s ice time was lessened for much of the rest of the game, but he doesn’€™t expect that to carry over.

‘€œI would hope not,’€ Pederson said, ‘€œbecause they really need him. He brings that element of speed and offense to the lineup, and I think he helps their power play as well.”

When the hosts expressed concern that the Bruins, particularly the older players, might be lagging come Saturday, Pederson said not to worry ‘€” the Blackhawks are in the same position, after all.

The bigger concern should be replacing Nathan Horton, if needed, after the forward left with an upper-body injury in the first overtime. Pederson suggested moving Tyler Seguin up to replace Horton on the first line, as Julien played it the rest of Game 1.

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Read More: Barry Pederson, Carl Soderberg, Claude Julien, Jordan Caron
Barry Pederson on D&C: Overaggressive Penguins ‘not making any plays’ 06.07.13 at 10:25 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined Dennis & Callahan on Friday morning to preview Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals. The Bruins can wrap up the series Friday night after taking a 3-0 series lead with Wednesday’s 2-1 victory in double overtime.

“It’s going to be tough for Pittsburgh, I think, to kind of bounce back after that type of loss,” Pederson said. “It wasn’t only a loss, it was the way you lose it, in double overtime. I think they had poured their emotion — they had obviously played a lot better than they had in the previous two games. I don’t think the Bruins played as well as they did in the two previous. But I do think the second period was kind of the opportunity for Pittsburgh to climb back in that series. They had three straight power plays and were unsuccessful. For the Bruins to come out of there in that situation, I think it kind of carried over into the overtimes.”

Pederson said the Penguins should have more urgency in this game, but they need a different strategy if they’re going to succeed.

Said Pederson: “I think the biggest surprise to me is not how well the Bruins are playing, because I’ve been around this enough and Claude Julien and his system to know how many good players they have, but it’s how poorly the Pittsburgh Penguins are playing and how out of sync they are with their game, and how they continue to sit in this game plan of — for some reason they must have watched the Vancouver series and thought that the Bruins had out-physicalitied the Vancouver Canucks, and we’re not going to let that happen to us, we’re not going to be intimidated. And they’re just running around like chickens with their heads cut off physically, and they’re not making any plays.”

With Gregory Campbell out after breaking his leg blocking a shot in the second period of Game 3, Pederson looked at the Bruins’ options going forward.

“What I would expect them to probably try and do is maybe move [Daniel] Paille up to that third line with [Chris] Kelly and [Tyler] Seguin, probably bring in [Kaspars] Daugavins or [Jordan] Caron, but I think Daugavins because I think the coach has more trust in him defensively, and he plays more of a fourth-line type of role. That means you move [Rich] Peverly to center, I think the coach trusts him there defensively and on faceoffs, he takes enough big faceoffs that you know that you can trust him in his own end. And of course with Shawn Thornton.

“So, I think they’ll try and play it that way. It will probably be more of a three-line rotation, but you will probably see this fourth line obviously a lot more than you did in the last game after Soupy was unfortunately out of the game.”

Pederson said the loss of Campbell cannot be overlooked.

“It’s big,” Pederson said. “It’s big because, we talked about going into the playoffs, if you had a strength, would you rather have a power play or penalty-killing. By far and away, when you look at the last two winners of the Stanley Cup, the Bruins and LA, we remember how dreadful both power plays were. But their penalty-killing and goaltending were exceptional. That just doesn’t give an offensive team any life whatsoever. So, they’re really going to miss him there.

“They’re going to miss him as a character player. He’s one of those guys that, like Shawn Thornton, in the dressing room the teammates just admire and respect what they do on a regular basis. It’s one thing for people just to remember him as a great role player in the sense that he goes out, he kills penalties, he does the little things that the coach really needs, and you can trust him to go out there and not be scored against. But it’s those games throughout the regular season when it’s 3-1, the Bruins are down, you need some type of momentum change. Well, he and Shawn Thornton go out there and do what they have to do to try and engage somebody. A lot of times, we all know with Soupy, he’s going to grab someone bigger than him, and he takes one for the team. And the guys really appreciate that.”

To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page. For more Bruins news, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Barry Pederson, Claude Julien, Gregory Campbell, Kaspars Daugavins
Barry Pederson on D&C: Penguins ‘forgot to play their game and work hard’ 06.04.13 at 10:17 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined Dennis & Callahan on Tuesday morning to offer his opinion of the B’s 6-1 rout of the Penguins in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals.

“I’m a little bit shocked at what I just witnessed last night. ‘€¦ How ill-prepared the Pittsburgh Penguins looked right from the opening faceoff of not only Game 2 but Game 1,” Pederson said. “It’s as if when they had their eight days off to prepare, they watched the Vancouver series the year the Bruins won the Cup and they said to themselves, ‘Listen, we’re not going to let them out-hit us, out-physical us. Let’s make sure that we start running around and be physical to show that we’re not going to be pushed around.’ But they completely forgot to play their game and work hard and do the little things.

“And then of course when you have bad goaltending that also breaks the spirit. They are not heading in the right direction, to say the least.”

Added Pederson: “I also think they got off to the wrong start in Game 1 where they looked rattled, they looked like they were very fragile, whining and complaining about calls. Even yesterday you could see that when things were offside they were jumping all over the linesman as if the linesman made mistakes. They look like they’re not focused, and they’re looking at the wrong things instead of themselves.”

Most of the criticism is being heaped upon stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

“When you’re talking about these two, to me, you’re talking about the two best players in the National Hockey League — not even the National Hockey League, in the world,” Pederson said. “When you sit there and you look now, you’re talking about two players that have lost their direction. They look like they’re unfocused. They’re I think setting bad examples for their teammates in the sense that they’re not working hard enough. You saw last night a number of fly-by situations where they had chances to stop, do the little things that you need to do to win championships.

“So, they’ve lost their focus and their direction, and they’ve got to get that back. Because they’re the ones that the team is going to be looking to here in Game 3 to kind of help them turn things around.”

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Read More: Barry Pederson, Evgeni Malkin, Marc-Andre Fleury, Sidney Crosby
Barry Pederson on D&C: ‘The Bruins are going to need a lot more intensity from their leaders’ 05.24.13 at 10:20 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined Dennis & Callahan on Friday to examine the B’s mistake-prone effort that cost them Game 4 vs. the Rangers.

Tuukka Rask had the most glaring error when he fell and let the Rangers break through with a cheap goal that cut the B’s lead to 2-1 in the second period.

“It’s one thing to give up a goal and kind of keep momentum. But the way that goal went in, with Tuukka falling flat on his butt and the puck going in, in one of the softer goals we’ve seen, that kind of started to change momentum,” Pederson said. “And then once [Zdeno] Chara gave up the other one it was as if kind of the floodgates opened up a little bit.

“But the Rangers still didn’t show me a lot last night. ‘€¦ It’s up to the Bruins. The Bruins are going to need a lot more intensity from their leaders. It wasn’t only Tuukka that I thought lost his concentration — because of probably lack of action — but also I didn’t think Chara, [Milan] Lucic and [David] Krejci, the three leaders that they’ve had so far this playoffs, I didn’t think they were nearly as intense as they had been. And that’s what makes it hard to win four games in a row. It’s not only the team that you’re playing is usually a little bit more desperate and playing with pride. It’s also the fact that you kind of let up a little bit.”

Added Pederson: “The Bruins just weren’t as intense and as focused as they need to be as a team. ‘€¦ You had the opportunity, you just let it slip through your fingers.”

Pederson said he was surprised at the effort — or lack thereof — from the Rangers.

“I didn’t see much at all from the Rangers last night that tells me, Oh, boy, this offensive juggernaut now all of a sudden is going to click; here they go. I thought it was a situation where the Bruins totally dominated the first part of that hockey game. I was shocked again at the end of the first period at how bad the New York Rangers looked. And then once the Bruins took that 2-0 lead I kind of felt like it was over and that the Bruins had complete control of this because the Rangers hadn’t showed us anything up to that point.

“So, the Bruins have to come home and be ready Saturday night right from the open, give the Rangers a reason to not show up. They have to bring that intensity level that they showed earlier on. I’m kind of counting on that, I think.”

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Read More: Barry Pederson, Dougie Hamilton, Tuukka Rask, Zdeno Chara
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